Friday, 28 June 2013

Warrington Playcentre


By Pippa Crane


Matariki has been our main focus recently, with plenty of lantern making and practising of "Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star" in English and Te Reo before the big event. We joined the parade from Playcentre to Warrington School with our lanterns, accompanied by drummers and there was even a stilt walker. With support from Warrington School's Room 3 (the new entrant class) we sang our song to quite a large audience. Being outside in the dark was a lot of fun as you can see from the photo of Benji and Ayesha.

Our lovely Reuben became a big brother, to baby Luke this month. Mother and baby are doing well and it's been lovely to have Reuben's Nana joining us at Playcentre whilst Kate is out of action. Well done to everyone – we can't wait to meet Luke soon.

There was lots of excitement about the expected snow, and we made paper snowflakes and pictures of snowmen, although the weather did not deliver the blizzard the children were all hoping for on the coast .... still, lots to talk about with such heavy snow inland, slips, flooding and road closures. Winter is finally here!

On 24 June we headed to Palmerston Playcentre to share with some of the other Playcentres ideas on our infant programme. It's always lovely to get together with other playcentres and collaborate and be part of the big Playcentre family.

If you are around and feel like some company, fun, friends and lots of lovely learning, come and join us on Wednesday and Friday mornings, 9:15 to 12:15.  We'd love to see you, everyone welcome! Ph 027 227 7329

Purakaunui School

by Hugh Patrick Davidson, Year 4


It has certainly been wild weather for our study of weather for our integrated term topic.  Mr Cook and Ms Duvall-Smith have been keeping the classrooms warm with the log burner and we have been using the Met Service website to look at the daily weather for our weather study we are doing.

The library and the office are all cosy with the new double glazing so we can play table tennis and have library time.

We visited the museum to look at weather on 26 June, after it was postponed from our snow day in mid-June.

We are thinking about the Stars on Stage performance and have lots of good ideas. We are also making a film about our Stars on Stage production from start to finish.

Come out and see our beautiful new school sign made by Colin Howes, with the new spelling of our school name: Purakaunui. Thanks to Colin and Nikki Taylor for organising this.

Parent teacher interviews are happening at present, occurring for half an hour per student at the students' homes or at school. Students have been writing their goals in preparation for this.

The Seniors are going to the Edgar Center Sports Day on 3  July. Everyone is welcome to our end-of term assembly where we show off our term's work and have a pot luck tea. Contact the school if you want to know about this or our popular Little Cockles pre-school group.



OROKONUI ECOSANCTUARY

By Sue Hensley

Orokonui's takahe "pair" Paku and Quammen are now happily free ranging

in the top grassy areas. Long may it last! Although these two look

like developing a pair bond they are unlikely to breed. Their role is

to advocate for their species rather than increase the population.

Both have had a long history of unsuccessful breeding attempts. They

are being fed daily around 11am and it has been great to watch these

birds feeding and bathing oblivious to the quiet gathering of

spectators.

Kiwi call monitoring has been completed for the season. Volunteers

went out 18 times over five months and listened for two hours at a

number of designated places (4–6 depending on number of listeners

available). They logged a total of 396 kiwi calls. Microphones have

also been placed in the sanctuary and have correlated well with human

counts. They will be left out until the end of June collecting data on

kiwi calling right throughout the night.

A good number of hardy souls braved the wintry conditions to attend

the highly acclaimed Richard Nunns and Paddy Free concerts. Although

snow forced the postponement of Fleur's cooking workshop it delighted

other visitors who have been able to follow the numerous kiwi and

takahe footprints along the main walking tracks.

Fleur's cooking workshop will now be held on 5 July and there are

still a couple of places left. There are two Matariki events remaining

for July – "a conversation with the stars" led by Kane Holmes on 6 July

4.30 pm and a plant a star and story time workshop on 7 July at

11 am.

A range of fun holiday programme workshops will keep children of all

ages entertained these holidays and details of these and other events

can be found on www.orokonui.org.nz or on our Facebook page. The

Visitor Centre and café are open daily.


Powerlines Goose-proofed

by Craig Marshall


Residents of Waitati, Purakaunui, Osborne and points in-between may have noticed brief interruptions to the power supply over the last few months. Typically, at dawn and dusk, the power shuts off for a few seconds before coming back on.

The surprising cause of this is geese and swans. According to Terry Jones, Network Manager, OtagoNet "swans and geese are flying off Blueskin Bay [the estuary] and colliding with the 33,000 volt line that runs along the seaward side of the railway line just north of the Waitati turn off". Because of their size, these birds "are large and heavy enough to push two of the wires together causing the fault and the momentary interruption while our automatic system detects the fault and restores the power".

The solution was to raise the central wire above the others so that they would not touch after a collision. This was done on 19 June and accounts for the planned interruption to supply that afternoon. The poles are in wetlands and so the work had to be done at low tide. Land-based poles can be modified 'live' but the specialised trucks needed for this couldn't be used in the salty mud.

Terry Jones commented, "We are hopeful this solution will eliminate the problem as a similar fix has successfully been implemented in other areas where geese were a problem. Please bear with us in the meantime and accept our apologies for these interruptions."

The effect of these collisions on the geese and swans is not recorded but is probably not happy.




Waikouaiti Coast Community Board

By Gerard Collings, Chairperson


Carey's Creek Bridge Remedial Work

Work is continuing on the necessary remedial and strengthening work on Carey's Creek Bridge, Coast Road. The work is likely to continue through to late July/August.

Community Board Discretionary Fund

The Board was pleased to assist the Waitati Toy Library with funding towards replacement toys and the Blueskin Playcentre to assist with a new sandpit from our discretionary fund. We are also looking forward to the forming of the new parking area at Warrington.

Service Acknowledgement

At our May meeting I was pleased to present, on behalf of Local Government NZ, long service awards to Alasdair Morrison and Andrew Noone for their service on our community board. The awards are given to members who have given 15 or more years' service. Thank you to you both.

2013 Elections

With the 2013 elections just around the corner, I would like to take the opportunity to encourage community-minded residents within our area to consider standing. Over recent elections it has been pleasing to see the quality of candidates putting their names forward. In my view it is important that our community has a choice with regard to who represents them to Council.

DCC consultation

Copies of DCC documents out for consultation are available from Council and through Council's website http://www.dunedin.govt.nz/council-online/currently-consulting-on

The Board's next meeting is 5.30pm 3 July at the Karitane Hall. The following meeting will be 5.30pm, 14 August at the Civic Centre Dunedin.

Members of the public are welcome to speak at the Board's public forum, however those wishing to do so need to advise Wendy Collard our Governance Support Officer (Phone 4743374) before 12 noon on the day prior to the meeting.  

Remember you can view the Boards meeting agendas, reports and minutes at either the Waikouaiti or Blueskin Libraries or through the DCC's website at http://www.dunedin.govt.nz/your-council/council-minutes

Members of the Board are only too happy to hear (by phone or email) from members of the community about any issues within our area.

Blueskin Resilient Communities Trust

By Scott Willis


Last year BRCT hosted international speaker, world-renowned financial analyst and energy industry consultant Nicole Foss as she kicked off the New Zealand leg of her world tour. This June we were again pleased to be able to host Nicole towards the end of a follow-up world tour. Since January 2008, she and co-author Raúl Ilargi Meijer have been chronicling and interpreting the on-going credit crunch as the most pressing aspect of our current multi-faceted predicament (a combination of climate change, resource depletion and economic volatility).

In two presentations (at the Pine Hill School and at the University of Otago) Nicole outlined a virtual world financial tour, looking at where different countries find themselves in terms of financial vulnerability, and potential immediacy of impact. The overview included Europe, Iceland, China, Australia and New Zealand, and demonstrated the highly integrated global financial system while helping to explain its seemingly chaotic nature. Nicole, with her growing familiarity with the New Zealand situation (and even with our own local frugality drive at local government level), was able to talk eloquently about the various roles of money and its scale, with lessons on how to restore trust, and ensure the economy works for us, and not vice versa. Stimulating talks and a stimulating guest, as always!

BRCT's Annual General Meeting was held on 31 May this year, aligning more closely with the Trust's financial year. Chris Skellett, Ross Johnston, Tony Wilson and Katie Parker were re-elected to the Trust, with Jenny McDonald and Charles Abraham entering their second term, and Gerry Carrington stepping down after two terms of dedicated service. The Trust's co-Chairs are Chris Skellett and Ross Johnston, Katie Parker replaces Gerry Carrington as secretary and Tony Wilson continues as treasurer.

Visit us at at the office at 1121 Mt Cargill Rd, Waitati, or our new website www.brct.org.nz or on Facebook. Telephone 482 2048.




Blueskin Energy Project Column

By Scott Willis


Our Pine Hill Community Energy Advice project (in partnership with Presbyterian Support) is now complete. Many thanks to Chris Freear for managing this work and successfully giving residents the tools to become effective 'energy practitioners' for their community.

BRCT remains committed to providing community energy advice and has a wealth of resources at the BRCT office. We are also working towards running a 'Cosy Homes Workshop' later in the year, conditional on funding.

Meanwhile, small scale solar installations and preparations for installations are continuing in Blueskin – usually between 2 – 4kW arrays per household. On 4 July "Solarcity" (a national solar provider) is providing an 'installation workshop' for an already well subscribed group of Blueskin residents who will gain skills and learn about solar systems and connection to the grid. Solar and wind complement each other extremely well as these two renewable systems generate power at different times, meaning that the level of energy fed into the grid is more steady than that of a wind cluster or household photovoltaic arrays alone.

We can't build community energy resilience overnight or with just one system but we can when we take a strategic approach. You can find out more about solar in our leaflet at the library or on the BRCT website.

Work on the wind cluster continues apace as we seek expert appraisals on environmental effects that might result from the proposed development. It is important to have as robust expert information as possible (while doing so with the resources we have) and we are incredibly grateful to the experts who are contributing their expertise to the project.

While it is relatively straightforward to install wind turbines and generate electricity we also need to find out whether there would be any undesirable effects (i.e. would there be noise, and if so, would it bother anyone nearby? Would there be any traffic disruptions during construction, and if so, how many?), and not simply concentrate on the many positives. This is part of the process of preparing a Resource Consent application, which is my main work at present.

It is fascinating getting into the close detail of what building local wind generation will involve, and I was pleased recently to be able to look at the proposed site with Terry Jones, OtagoNet's 'Network Manager'. Terry was in Blueskin to look at the local network, appraise the substation, and get a feel for what upgrades are urgent. We took the opportunity to visit Porteous Hill. Although Terry has been helping closely with the project (for years), it was the first time he had visited the site and he was impressed at how close the 33kV lines are to the proposed site. This proximity will make connection very simple. And right now, evaluating the length of the trench for the underground cable to connect to the 33kV lines is just one of the small but crucial details that need to be included in the description of the project.

Once a full Resource Consent application draft is complete, another round of community engagement will take place to see if anything has been missed, before it is lodged with the DCC.

Visit us at: www.blueskinpower.co.nz, or at the office at 1121 Mt Cargill Rd, Waitati. Telephone enquiries can be made on 482 2048 (the Wind Cluster) and for any information about the solar project email solar@blueskinpower.co.nz.

Waitati Open Orchards

by Hilary Rowley


It's far too miserable outside at the moment, and even thinking about doing garden-type things is beyond me -- blame it on the 'sleety showers'.  Thoughts instead turn to food, as they do, and the fruit stored in the apple boxes in our pantry.

On the subject of pantries, modern houses are generally too warm for food storage, but if you can keep a room cool and dry and an even temperature with a bit of ventilation, it will do. Those safe cupboards in old houses with the mesh screen opening onto the shady south wall of the house were just the thing. The garage or shed would probably be OK if you can keep the rodents out.

An awful winter's day at home is perfect for some slow cooking, like the making of quince paste. I have lost my actual recipe, but it's easy enough without one.  I use four big quinces, but any number is fine. Put your quinces whole, stalk, skin and all, in a pot of water and boil them until they are tender. Drain them and leave them to cool. When you can handle them, peel off the skins, remove the cores and mush up the resulting pulpy flesh.

Measure your quince pulp in a cup into a deep, thick-bottomed pot. Skinny-bottomed pots are hopeless as your mixture will burn and stick. For each cup of quince pulp add one cup of sugar. Gently heat this mixture, stirring all the time with a wooden spoon. It's a thick and sticky mixture so set yourself up next to the stove on a bar stool, with a book, and stir it frequently for as long as it takes.

When the spoon can be dragged through the mixture and leaves a distinct track, and the mixture has a shiny, glossy look, pour it into trays in a layer 1.5-2cm thick.  I grease the trays with just a trace of cooking oil. You can use a sponge roll tin, or those plastic storage boxes made out of the non-cancer-causing plastic. Place the trays in your hot-water cupboard for a couple or more weeks, turn occasionally if you want. When the slab is firmish, you can slice it up into squares and wrap them in baking paper. Store in an air-proof container.

Next time the weather is really nasty and too cold for outdoor pursuits, sit back by the fire with a cup of good coffee and a slice of quince paste on a cracker, and consider trying the same recipe using apples instead of quinces.



Qigong Classes in Waitati

by Jay Baker


Qigong has a history of over 7000 years in China. For the most part it is not nearly as well-known as some related practices, for example acupuncture or traditional Chinese medicine. In truth however, these wouldn't be what they are today without Qigong's valuable contribution.

Qigong exercises are mostly slow, flowing movements that work over the whole body. They are easy to learn, and work to improve the health of the body and the strength of the mind. Practice can be done more or less intensively according to the individual's needs and wants. Used well they are a valuable practice with obvious benefits.

Qi can be thought of as our vitality. Having a good qi condition means your health is in a good state and you feel naturally relaxed and joyful inside. By contrast, if a person's qi or vitality is low then it can be said that they are qi-depleted. Many things can contribute to this, overwork or stress for example.

In fact, there is a connection between our mind and our qi; where our mind goes, qi will also go. So if we lead a busy life with the mind always outwardly focused then over time our energy levels can also become low and we can feel tired and worn out. The value of Qigong is that it teaches the mind to return inward, improving our vitality and our health, and helping us become more relaxed in our day-to-day living.

Qigong is a practical method of improving one's life. I personally swear by my daily practice and feel I have benefitted greatly from it. As well as teaching the exercises, I also try help people to learn to feel qi and understand the importance of looking after their qi and themselves.

If you are interested in improving the quality of your life then Qigong is a tool that can help a lot on this path. It looks at life from a holistic perspective working to strengthen health though work on the body, mind and, of course, qi. Come along and give it a go. Classes are on Tuesdays, 6:30pm in the Waitati Hall. No experience is needed and beginners are most welcome.

Also, if you have any questions feel free to contact me at bodymindqi@gmail.com.



Notice


Warrington Surf Life Saving Club

Annual General Meeting

Sunday 18 August 2013

2:30pm followed by afternoon tea at 3:00pm

Warrington Surf Clubrooms

Everybody welcome

Notice


The AGM of Blueskin Media, which produces Blueskin News, will be held on Wednesday July 10 at Blueskin Bay Library, Waitati at 7 pm. All welcome.

In Memory of Henry Skellett

by Chris, Lois, Lucy and Jessica Skellett


On 15 May, Henry Skellett unexpectedly passed away in his sleep, aged just 21 years. Henry lived happily for all of his life in Warrington.

Thank you all so much for your love and support during these very difficult days. At times like this, it is wonderful to be part of such an amazing community as Blueskin Bay. We would not want to live anywhere else in the world. Thank you all.


MORNING

by Jenny Powell

Ring the alarm bells, stop the trains,

Call for the life savers, unhook the chains

Of coastguards, fire fighters, doctors on the beat,

Breath has stopped in his deep dream sleep.

Night washes out through the open door,

Dark day dawns on the sharp shell shore,

Prepare the road for a stream of grief

As the town wakes dazed in disbelief.

The sea weeps wild on a king size tide,

Shore birds keen for a young man died,

Mourning calls in the wail of a dog,

Blueskin Bay wears a shroud of fog.

Silence the poets, turn away the choir,

Platitudes inflame death's line of fire.

Time takes charge and changes the pace,

Carries him young in love's embrace.

Climate Change Adaptation Plan for Waitati

by Niki Bould, Projects Coordinator, BRCT


The Blueskin Resilient Communities Trust has partnered with the Dunedin City Council to work on a climate change adaptation plan for Waitati in 2013. We are conducting interviews with Waitati residents, seeking their views on climate change and their ideas about future potential actions that could be taken.  If you are a member of the Waitati community then we would love to hear your ideas or stories regarding issues that are potentially associated with climate change (such as challenges or opportunities to do with water, waste, transport, energy or food).  If you have any stories or questions, or have time for a short interview, then please email: niki@brct.org.nz

Bus Route Changes


by the editors


From 1 July significant changes have been made to the Dunedin - Palmerston bus service.

The new routes are described below:

Palmerston to Dunedin:

Bus departs from Palmerston Bond Street terminus, then via Ronaldsay Street (State Highway 1) to Waikouaiti.

Travels down Kildare Street, Collins Street, Beach Street, Scotia Street and Fell Street, then back onto Beach Street and onto Main Road (State Highway 1) to Karitane.

Travels along Coast Road, right onto Scarp Street, right onto Stornoway Street, then back along Coast Road onto State Highway 1.

Travels along State Highway 1, stops at Evansdale and Waitati, then continues to Dunedin, down Pine Hill Road, turns left onto Great King Street, then left onto Bank Street, and onto George Street. Continues along George Street to the Octagon terminus (Hoyts Stand 3).

Dunedin to Palmerston:

Bus departs Octagon terminus (Hoyts Stand 3) and travels via upper Stuart Street, Smith Street, St Andrew Street and onto Cumberland Street to Stand 5 (Centre City New World).

From Stand 5, along Cumberland Street, up Pine Hill Road onto State Highway 1.

Stops in Waitati, then continues along State Highway 1, stops at Evansdale, and continues along State Highway 1 to Karitane.

Turns onto Coast Road, right onto Scarp Street, right onto Stornoway Street, then back along Coast Road to State Highway 1.

At Waikouaiti, travels along Beach Street, Scotia Street, Thomas Street, Fell Street, back onto Beach Street, along Collins Street to Kildare Street.

Turns back onto State Highway 1 to Palmerston, travels along Bond Street to Bond Street terminus.

At Waitati, the bus departs from the bus shelter on State Highway 1, just north of the Harvey Street intersection. New bus timetables were delivered to Waitati and surrounding area residential addresses last week.


Monday, 24 June 2013

Warrington Playcentre


By Pippa Crane


Matariki has been our main focus recently, with plenty of lantern making and practising of "Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star" in English and Te Reo before the big event. We joined the parade from Playcentre to Warrington School with our lanterns, accompanied by drummers and there was even a stilt walker. With support from Warrington School's Room 3 (the new entrant class) we sang our song to quite a large audience. Being outside in the dark was a lot of fun as you can see from the photo of Benji and Ayesha.

Our lovely Reuben became a big brother, to baby Luke this month. Mother and baby are doing well and it's been lovely to have Reuben's Nana joining us at Playcentre whilst Kate is out of action. Well done to everyone – we can't wait to meet Luke soon.

There was lots of excitement about the expected snow, and we made paper snowflakes and pictures of snowmen, although the weather did not deliver the blizzard the children were all hoping for on the coast .... still, lots to talk about with such heavy snow inland, slips, flooding and road closures. Winter is finally here!

On 24 June we headed to Palmerston Playcentre to share with some of the other Playcentres ideas on our infant programme. It's always lovely to get together with other playcentres and collaborate and be part of the big Playcentre family.

If you are around and feel like some company, fun, friends and lots of lovely learning, come and join us on Wednesday and Friday mornings, 9:15 to 12:15.  We'd love to see you, everyone welcome! Ph 027 227 7329