Thursday, 24 November 2011

The Spatial Plan: How will Blueskin Bay look in 2050?

by Geraldine Tait

Many of you will not have heard the term spatial plan. It hasn't got
anything to do with NASA and astronauts; it is a document setting out
directions for Dunedin's growth and development for the next 30+
years. It will also be used as the basis for changes in the new
District Plan. Bored already? That's right it doesn't read much like a
thriller or juicy romance.

However, there is an interesting section outlining key issues for
Dunedin, which seems to show an enlightened attitude to climate change
and peak oil. It also mentions protecting productive farmland,
heritage buildings, landscape values and biodiversity. Our ageing
population, old cold houses, cycling, walking, public transport and
local power generation also feature, but further into the plan the
focus rapidly moves from a sort of eco-greenie theme to one of divide
and rule. Something called distributed development is proposed which
has the majority of development occurring in urban areas with some
expansion of outlying townships in order to increase the
self-sufficiency of these communities.

In the Waikouaiti Coast Community Board area three townships are
proposed for further development; these are Waikouaiti, Hawksbury and
Waitati, while it recommends Karitane, Seacliff and Warrington retain
existing levels of development consistent with character values and
good design. What does this mean for Waitati? A large chunk of Doctors
Point is outlined on a map with the wording 'allow some expansion in
suitable areas'. If you are like me you will be smelling a very large
rat about now! Waitati has probably seen the biggest development of
lifestyle blocks and rural residential sections of any area around
Dunedin. Many of these are still not built on and quite a few are
finished but on the market. So there is no shortage of that type of
property in our area, in fact there is probably a glut. How would
subdividing more land in Waitati make it more self-sufficient or
resilient? The plan says that in order to create strong communities we
need growth in population to help retain local services (shops,
transport and schools) and employment. Our local shop relies as much
or more on passing trade as it does on local support to function. If
anything threatens its future it is the plan to move the highway and
displace the shop.

Waikouaiti has twice the population of Waitati but it shares the same
little bus service that we have, so doubling Waitati's population
won't get us extra buses. The viability of our local schools has not
improved since Don's-Creekisation, in fact I would argue that the
massive increases in property values associated with the subdivision
of farms has made our village a lot less affordable for young
families. The existence of small rural schools is very much in the
hands of the Minister and Ministry of Education, who like to take out
their lazar guns every few months and zap a few more schools into
oblivion.

Would an increase in population create more local jobs? This is a very
complex question. Many of us in this area work in town, there is a
small growth in self-employment and people working from home. Local
employers such as the nursery, and Orokonui Eco-sanctuary mainly rely
on customers from outside our area; Waitati's population has little
effect on them. There are a lot more local jobs in Waikouaiti, these
arise mainly from businesses which support the farming community.
Others succeed because the distance to travel to obtain goods and
services in Dunedin is much greater for people living in Waikouaiti
than it is for Waitati locals.

There are many things we could do and are being done by a number of
local groups and individuals to make Waitati a more resilient and
self-sufficient township. The Blueskin News features some of these
every month. We do welcome new people to our community especially when
they send their kids to the school and playcentre, shop locally and
join some of our many groups which help to make this a great place to
live. BUT we don't need any more major subdivisions or loosening of
rules about lot sizes in the rural zones. If you agree with me, get a
copy of the Spatial Plan and make a submission to council before it's
too late!

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From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point, Purakaunui), Dunedin,
New Zealand. All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in
the public domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and
republished. If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

Thank you, Waitati

by Katherine Petters

My partner, Josh and I were involved in a head on collision about 2km
south of Waitati on 13 November at the Donalds Hill Rd intersection
and our dog got such a fright that he ran off down the highway and
into the bush.

We could not find him that night but the next day we hit Waitati with
some flyers for our missing dog and what we discovered was an
extremely kind and compassionate community. Everyone we spoke to was
so concerned. Mandy Mayhem made calls to those she knew and Jan from
Waitati Valley Rd had copied some of our flyers and was handing them
out in people's mailboxes and we hadn't even talked to her yet! The
ladies at the general store were all lovely. We even had a suggestion
to print loads of flyers and give them to the mailman to hand out on
his mail run the next day. Bev, the mailman's wife was very obliging.
We ended up finding our dog at the end of that day and went home
feeling so moved by people's kindness.

The people I have mentioned are the ones whose names we caught but
there were so many others whose properties we visited who said they'd
look for him and even in the week after the accident I received calls
and texts asking if we'd found him. I have only been in New Zealand
for a year and this experience has made me feel very welcome and happy
to be in such a great place where people take time to really help you.
Josh, Scruffy and I say a BIG thank you to everyone who helped us so
kindly on that day.

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From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point, Purakaunui), Dunedin,
New Zealand. All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in
the public domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and
republished. If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

Wednesday, 23 November 2011

Orokonui Ecosanctuary

By Sue Hensley

December is the time of year when we look back on just what's been
achieved. For the sanctuary this was done at a restoration meeting
held in November where academics, DOC staff, Orokonui staff and
trustees got together to discuss all aspects of past and future
species translocations.

Snipe (a small bird with an eerie nocturnal call followed by the sound
of vibrating tail feathers) was one such proposal. An Otago Uni
zoology student did the preliminary investigation and found that
Orokonui had only small areas of habitat similar to where it is found
today and not enough invertebrate life at the depth of normal feeding
for snipe. An interesting finding was that snipe have been pushed
into limited habitats because of predation and so not enough is really
known about the range of habitats they can survive in. Their
translocation to Whenua Hou/ Codfish Island may help to provide some
answers.

Meanwhile at Orokonui this is the season for orchids flowering and the
appearance of young birds. Patience and careful looking and listening
are often rewarded by the sight of a parent feeding its chicks.

It is crazy how quickly the end of the year comes around and the New
Year approaches. If you are still Christmas shopping go online (or
come up to the Visitor's Centre) and check out the gift vouchers for
tours, memberships and shop items. There is a great selection of jade/
pounamu and other works from local artists, too.

A very big thank you to all the wonderful locals who have helped out
in numerous ways during 2011 and best wishes for a happy Christmas and
New Year to everyone.

News and events can be found on www.orokonui.org.nz or on our Facebook page.
The Visitor Centre is open daily (closed December 24, 25) 9.30 – 4.30
(cafe 10 – 4).

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From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point, Purakaunui), Dunedin,
New Zealand. All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in
the public domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and
republished. If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

Warrington School

Students Out and About
Waianakarua has been the senior class camp destination for the last
six years. This year we also included a pre-camp trip to Orokonui
Ecosancturary. These are the students' expereiences.

Ko Moponui te Mauka, by Ruby Harris
Recently, Warrington senior students trekked up Mount Moponui.
Climbing banks, sliding through mud and using trees to hoist
themselves up, 20-plus kids and adults gratefully sat down at the top,
admiring the scenery and learning about Moponui's water catchment
feeding Blueskin Bay. Luckily we had Tahu and Sophie from the Orokonui
Ecosanctuary with us who shared their great knowledge. The view
towards Warrington was magnificent and we could see the bush and
vegetation covering the Orokonui Valley leading to the Waitati
Estuary. Everyone loved the day. Thank you so much Tahu, Sophie and
Orokonui Ecosanctuary - it was an awesome day!

Ancient Artifact Washed Up From the Ocean, by Rammy El Dessouky and Mary Locker
During our class camp beachcombing, finding pretty stones, driftwood
and the occasional piece of rubbish, our teacher Mr P stopped and
picked up a Maori toki (adze). Straightaway Mr P had a strong urge to
throw the toki back into the sea. He also wondered who owned it and
what is the correct thing to do with such a special artifact. A parent
phoned the Moeraki Marae to ask what should be done with it. The toki
was blessed over the phone, someone from the marae would collect it
later in the week and we were given instructions on how to care for it
in the meantime.
The toki was shaped for carving and very smooth. It turned a different
colour after people touched it. The toki was probably very old.
As promised, Moeraki Marae representative Patrick came to collect it.
We took the toki back to the beach where it had been found. We
couldn't reach the spot because the tide was in; we had found the toki
when it was out.
We pointed out into the waves where it was found and Patrick put that
into his GPS. He also took some photos of the area. Patrick said a
karakia to take the tapu off the toki and we replied with our school
waiata.
The toki was to be registered with the Crown and Patrick hopes that it
will be taken back to the Moeraki Marae. No one knows what will happen
to it now but it sure was cool finding it.

Water Monitoring on Camp, by Naomi Ashby-Ryan and Ashlie Carbines
While at camp Waianakarua, near the river,  two OCR water scientists,
Rachel and Dylan, came and taught us about water monitoring. We tested
the temperature, clarity, habitat and PH. All the results were in the
excellent category, good news for us as the day before we had all been
swimming and playing in the river.
We also searched for invertebrates, using a chart to identify the
various creatures we found. Bugs can indicate if the stream is good or
not. We found a big cockabilly fish and lots of mayflies in their
stone houses. We also found a stenoperla (stone-fly) and other
interesting bugs. These bugs and fish only live in high quality
rivers.
The camp river has a cobbled bed, a 7.5 PH reading and the clarity was
completely clear - the whole metre wide. There was a thin layer of
native algae, which is good for the invertebrates (but not for dogs).
This indicated a great habitat for invertebrates and other creatures.
The stream had excellent results. Yay!!!

Fun in the Great Outdoors, by Elsa Neuman, Indy Darling-Perry and Shea Abbott
At camp Waianakarua there was a camper van parked on the other side of
the playing field. This van is home to Professor Panic who is visiting
from the UK where he owns a circus. The Professor has lots of puppets
and circus gear that he uses to impress crowds and which he shared
with we senior students.
The professor also has a story coat. Inside it has 100 pockets, 50 on
the left and 50 on the right. In each pocket there is a tiny treasure.
With each treasure there is a big story.
At night we got to choose a pocket and the professor told us the story
that went with it. The one I remembered best was about the man that
tricked death twice and lived for 210 years.
One evening Professor Panic made a game where half the class were
fielders and half held the edge of a smallish parachute. A soft toy
frog was placed in the middle of the parachute and the team holding
the parachute laid it down on the grass. The parachute team then said
"ahhhhhhhh" starting from a deep sound and getting higher. At the end
of the "ahhhhhhhh" the parachute would be flicked up, making a sound
like a whip. The frog flew up in the air about 10 metres and the
fielders tried to catch it. If the fielders caught the frog three
times the teams swapped over.
Professor Panic also has a huge parachute and we played games with
that. It didn't flick the frog like the other one but we played a
swapping game where we would change places while it was inflated.
Professor Panic was incredible!

Splash, Dive, Whoosh! by Lichen Sorrel
Flipping and flying off the diving board at the Oamaru indoor swimming
pool! It is a really cool place. It has a hot pool area and a one
metre diving board that goes into a 3.5m deep pool. There is also a
pool about one metre deep. And then there are three little pools that
are 30 centimetres deep. Oh, and I can't forget the lane swimming
pool; it has about 15 lanes! We had such a great time!

Little Protected Creatures from the Ocean, by Lindsay Dowden-Mackay
At Oamaru there were probably 600 little blue penguins that came to
shore and into their little wooden huts. From 8.30 tp 10pm groups of
blue penguins waddled up the rocks to rest after a busy day of
fishing. We had to stand behind the fence. There were fences in the
shape of triangles that the penguins had to walk through. When there
were fewer people around the penguins came up closer because they
weren't quite so scared!

From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point, Purakaunui), Dunedin,
New Zealand. All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in
the public domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and
republished. If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

Blueskin Resilient Communities Trust

By Scott Willis

 

The DCC decision on the BRCT funding application to pilot a Community Energy Advisory service is still pending, as I write. The BRCT office needs a good (though late) spring-cleaning, after all the recent activity in the energy area, particularly. This is always a hectic time of the year though, and BRCT will meet in December to set strategic direction again for the 2012–2015 period.


One thing on the table for 2012 is a workshop for sustainability/transition groups in Blueskin, to try to see if there are any challenges and solutions within the great variety of dynamic initiatives underway. Time is short for solving the problems we all face collectively and yet it's worth pausing a moment to celebrate the community energy to 'get things done' – the days are long gone when it's a small group of 'all the same people'. Much has happened since the early days we've all grown and systems have evolved, we've developed experience, ways of working, encountered problems and experienced the joys of success.

 

Coming up also in December I will be attending a meeting of Climate Change hubs in Wellington and I'll take that opportunity to have a range of meetings to further Blueskin Energy Project ambitions and shore up national networks to enhance BRCT actions.

 

Meanwhile, if you're aiming for some high AND low carbon, engaged summer action away from Blueskin Bay, why not head along to the 'Keep the Coal in the Hole Summer Festival' in Mataura, 20 -23 January? (see: http://nocoalsummerfest.org.nz/).

 

Now, some more detail on the Draft Spatial Plan. Copies of the plan and the summary document are available at our local library, the DCC and online at www.dunedin.govt.nz/consultation/spatialplan. I also have some copies of the summary in the BRCT office (please come after 3pm – best day Friday).


Strong elements? The challenges of climate change, peak oil and natural hazards have been clearly identified. The preferred option for future planning is "Distributed Development" which essentially recognises the different character and values of distinct communities to enable more holistic planning. That could mean local provisioning of energy (BEP action), low carbon transport systems (Blueskin Low Oil Commuting, W3, walking and cycling groups, Get-The-Train), local food production (Weggies, Waitati Open Orchards, local growers) and other things. It will mean we plan to evacuate low-lying areas over time and certainly stop building in flood zones. It will mean we build up the local economy (rezoning, allowing more appropriate scale business activity) and ensure we have the infrastructure to ensure quality of life for people in our communities. A sobering article in the Guardian really underlines why we must plan for a low carbon future (http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2011/nov/09/fossil-fuel-infrastructure-climate-change).


In it, the International Energy Agency, a very conservative body, argues that if we don't change our energy infrastructure within the next five years, we'll lose 'for ever' the opportunity to stop runaway climate change. In relation to the spatial plan, the long-term plan and the city's economic development, it means we must stop courting oil exploration companies (old fossil fuel industry) and redirect city funding and resources towards clean technology. Only by ending subsidies to fossil fuel can we hope to build a positive future for our children.

 

The BRCT's office number is 482 2048 and BRCT trustees and officers are Lynnaire Johnston, PJ Clarke, Antony Deaker, Ross Johnston, Tony Wilson, Gerry Carrington and Chris Skellett, with Jeanette Fitzsimons as the trust's patron. You can find out more about the trust at: http://www.blueskinpower.co.nz/

 

 

Blueskin Energy Project

By Scott Willis


A four turbine wind-cluster located at Porteous Hill above Warrington is closer to being confirmed as viable, with wind measurements and modelling demonstrating sufficient wind. Financial viability, however, rests not just on wind quality, but also on community support and on ensuring a power purchase agreement.


By now many Blueskin residents have attended an Open Day, completed the survey or accessed information about the project from the website, or just followed it in the media. Don't worry if that despite all this, the project is still new to you. There is no intention to move into full development until a few more questions have been answered. These are:

1. Are Blueskin residents still strongly supportive?

2. What level of local investment is available?

3. Are we able to secure a good power purchase agreement?


Now, of course, everyone is looking forward to Christmas and the holidays, however it is also a good moment to get more details. If you want someone to come and explain the proposal and you live in the Purakaunui, Long Beach, Osbourne area, phone Ross Johnston on 482 1029 or email him at jpl@callsouth.net.nz and leave your contact details.


If you live in the Waitati – Warrington area phone me on 482 2048 or email scott@blueskinpower.co.nz and leave contact details.

By mid 2012 BRCT will be in a position to assess community support and will then be able to make a decision on preparing a Resource Consent application. There will be public meetings about all this before then.


An important DCC document that will affect you and our community is out now. Called the 'Draft Spatial Plan' it is a geographical perspective on how our communities can meet the needs of current and future generations. In my opinion, and having had input from an early stage of the plan's development, this is a very good document. You can be assured that plenty of people with an interest in our landscape will be submitting on the spatial plan – but the DCC will value hearing from residents and not just property developers.


BEP perspectives will be incorporated into the BRCT submission, which will be submitted by the new deadline of 13 January 2012. As a guide to how the DCC is incorporating broad perspectives in the spatial plan, you will see reference to the 'Waitati Energy Project' (now of course we're 'BlueskinEP'). In this peak oil period it is crucial that our local authority does plan for the whole city's energy needs – and the plan offers a start. Among other things, the plan will help shape the District Plan (covers land-use/planning issues), the transport strategy and the economic development strategy, and will have an effect on community initiatives. It is quite likely that this plan will give greater leverage to community initiatives that are delivering results for local communities, particularly if residents submit their support.

 

For more information look in the BRCT column and contact me (482 2048) if you have any burning concern/positive comment and I'll see if it can be incorporated. Have a lovely big fat summer break and a low carbon holiday!

 

 



Waitati Toy Library


Waitati Toy Library
Open fortnightly
Saturday  10:30-11:30am
&
Monday   6:30-7:30pm
at Waitati Hall, Harvey Street
December dates: 10 and 12
Closed for January
February dates: 11,13,25,27
For more info
Contact Frances at 482 1991


Tuesday, 22 November 2011

Blueskin Garden Club

By Lyn Hastie
Blueskin Garden Club activities are coming to an end for the year. Members and their spouses/partners will celebrate Christmas with a Progressive Dinner in the Michies Crossing, Doctors Point Road area on Saturday December 10 at 6.30pm. This year instead of exchanging gifts we will be bringing along items to be donated to the S.P.C.A.
This month members paid a visit to the Hawksbury Lagoon and and iris garden in Waikouaiti.
Our next meeting on February 11 will see another trip to Waikouaiti where we will have a talk on growing dahlias. If you would like to join our club details of our activities are always in "Blueskin News" and in Friday's ODT. Alternatively you can phone Lyn 4822896 or Glenys 4822640.
Wishing you all a safe and merry Christmas and happy days in the garden. Special thanks to all those involved in providing this great little monthly newsletter.
 



Christmas Brunch on the River Bank

By Rosemary Penwarden and Derek Onley

Last year's Christmas brunch on the Orokonui Road river bank beside
the WOO fruit trees was a great success, so we're doing it again this
year, weather permitting.

The fruit trees and a cleared path beside the river from the bridge to
the picnic area are looking great. If a low-key start to Christmas day
sounds good to you, come and join us. Bring a bit of food and/or drink
to share. Everyone welcome. 11am start.


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From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point, Purakaunui), Dunedin,
New Zealand. All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in
the public domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and
republished. If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

Monday, 21 November 2011

WAIKOUAITI COAST COMMUNITY BOARD

by Gerard Collings, Chairman

Where has the year gone -- Christmas is here already.  On behalf of
the Waikouaiti Coast Community Board I wish to thank all those
volunteers throughout the community who have given their time and
effort to the various projects and events within our area this year.
Please take the time over the holiday period to relax and enjoy the
special places within our area.  We wish everyone a merry Christmas
and a happy and safe New Year.

At our November meeting the board were pleased to confirm financial
assistance from our discretionary fund to the Karitane Special
Projects Group towards their medal presentation ceremony.

The Dunedin City Council has released Dunedin's draft Spatial Plan for
public consultation. The Spatial Plan is an overall strategic document
that will provide the council's vision for the next 30-40 years.  It
will feed into, guide decision making, and provide overall strategic
direction in areas such as water, waste, roading/transport,
recreation, parks and reserves, and the city's District Plan.  As such
it is important that our community make themselves familiar with the
draft Spatial Plan and participate in the consultation process. Copies
of the draft plan will be available at our local libraries, from the
council and through the council's website:
http://www.dunedin.govt.nz/council-online/currently-consulting-on
Submissions are scheduled to close on 13 January 2012.

The  Waikouaiti Coast Community Board's next meeting is at 5:30pm on
25 January 2012 in Waitati Hall. Members of the public wishing to
speak at the public forum need to advise Jane Hinkley our Governance
Support Officer (Phone 474 3374) before 12 noon on the day prior to
the meeting.

Remember, you can view the board's meeting agendas, reports and
minutes at either the Waikouaiti or Blueskin libraries or through the
DCC's website at
http://www.dunedin.govt.nz/your-council/council-minutes

Members of the board are only too happy to hear (by phone or email)
from members of the community about any issues within our area.

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From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point, Purakaunui), Dunedin,
New Zealand. All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in
the public domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and
republished. If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

BLUESKIN LIBRARY

by Louise Booth

Carolyn McCurdie started work at the Blueskin Bay Library in March 1999. On Friday 9 December 2011 she is retiring from her position at the library to concentrate on her writing career. She has worked under three librarians and has witnessed the library being open from three to six days a week. Carolyn has made a huge contribution to the library and we have enjoyed celebrating the publishing of her first children's novel The Unquiet.
 
On 9 December Friday afternoon we will have a party at the library so that you can farewell Carolyn. So please come and wish farewell to Carolyn any time from 2-6pm Friday 9 December.


If this message is not intended for you please delete it and notify us immediately; you are warned that any further use, dissemination, distribution or reproduction of this material by you is prohibited.




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From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media: voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff, Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point, Purakaunui), Dunedin, New Zealand. All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished. If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".


Thursday, 17 November 2011

WAITATI SCHOOL: Book reviews

Charlie Bone and the Red Knight, by Jenny Nimmo.  Reviewed by James Burchell.

Charlie Bone and the Red Knight is a book about the final battle of the endowed children of the Red King.  Woe! the swordsman Ashkelan Kapaldi and the enchanter, Count Harken, Shadow of Badlock are out of their paintings.  Dagbert the downer is a good guy because he's stopped drowning people and regrets ever drowning anyone.  The main idea of it is to kill all evil.  They achieve this by fighting it out between good and evil. 

Predator's Gold, by Philip Reeve.  Reviewed by Finn Kelly.

Tom and Hester have had a peaceful two years since the downfall of Traction City, London, roaming the skies in an airship called the Jenny Haivener.  But now evil is back and a rising agency called Green Storm is destroying all their enemies, as well as Traction City's next stop…Tom and Hester.

Get ready for the roller coaster ride of the Mortal Engines.  Prepare for the treacherous journey to the dead continent America while being chased by a large threatening city 'Arkangle'.  Be warned: you may encounter stealthy thieves, hilarious dwarfs and a famous writer who has lied about everything in his books.  If he doesn't speak up soon Anchorage (Traction City) will be driving to its doom.

 

The Little House series, by Laura Ingalls Wilder.  Reviewed by Tat Carr.

The Little House series of books is set in the 18th century.  The first book is set in America in the woods of Wisconsin.  In book two, Laura and her family move to the prairie where there are Indians, and wolves and many other animals.

Smiling Jack, by Ken Catran.  Reviewed by Lucan Willis.

I think Smiling Jack is a very gory book and has lots of murders.  It's about a guy called Robert who gets caught up in a murder mystery starting with his dad getting killed in a car accident.  The great thing about Smiling Jack is that the excitement is evenly spaced out throughout the book.  The other great thing about Smiling Jack is that it's also very realistic and seems like it's based on a true story.  It also has very detailed descriptions of the settings.  You can really picture them in your head.  I would definitely recommend this book to anyone who loves blood and guts mysteries.

 

Land of Snow, by Skye Waters.

This book is about a girl called Ella and she is walking home with her best friend Isabella then Ella hears a faint husky howl and her friend Isabella could not hear it. They went closer and Isabella could still not hear it. Then when they found it Isabella could hear it so then Ella took the husky home and called it Blue. Blue is no ordinary dog he is a magic dog.... Read this book and you will find out the magic and how it begins.

 

Rhiannon of the Spring, by Allan Frewin Jones.  Reviewed by Ahi

The story of a wild princess with extreme skills with a slingshot, the book drew me in almost immediately and hasn't let go. With a heart full of bravery and a mind of steel this princess will have a hard time fitting in with another royal family!  I give Rhiannon of the Spring a 9 out of 10; it was truly amazing but it just didn't go on long enough!  I would recommend this book to people 9 and over though it would be a good read for a mature 8yr old.


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Ā ā Ē ē Ī ī Ō ō Ū ū
From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media: voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff, Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand. All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished. If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".


Wednesday, 16 November 2011

Living Legends: Thank you and 2012 date

by Liz Sherwood, Community Relations Ranger, Coastal Otago Area Office, Department of Conservation.

Job well done, thanks to you!

The Department of Conservation and Living Legends wish to thank all the residents of Blueskin Bay who helped with the planting day at Orokonui Scenic Reserve in September. We are grateful for your support in preparation for, and on, the day. We were delighted with the turnout of around 220 people, and the result – all 4600 native plants in the ground.

Ongoing maintenance of plantings is required, and this will be provided by contractors and volunteers. If you are interested in helping, and have a little time to spare, weeding around plants over summer as the grass grows would be highly beneficial.

A follow-up Living Legends planting day is scheduled for Sunday 2 September 2012. We will be planting a further 2500 natives around the estuary margin. Any plants that don't survive this summer will be replaced then.

DOC and Living Legends look forward to your involvement again next year. If you have any questions or comments, please contact the Coastal Otago Area Office Ph 477 0677 or email rhiscock@doc.govt.nz

Thank you and happy holidays!

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Ā ā Ē ē Ī ī Ō ō Ū ū
From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media: voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff, Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand. All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished. If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".


Monday, 14 November 2011

POLICE COMMUNITY REPORT: Blueskin area

by Constable Jon-Paul Tremain

 

Tënä koutou katoa,

 

On 1 October a vehicle was stolen while parked at the Warrington Domain.  It was taken in the middle of the day while the owner was out walking her dog. The car was recovered the next day down a bank along State Highway 1 not far from Warrington.

 

On 19 October a wallet, iPod, and cell phone were taken from a vehicle while it was parked at an address along Coast Road, Warrington. The owner left the vehicle unlocked and was away from it for only a short time; it would appear that an opportunistic thief took advantage of this.  Inquiries are continuing in relation to this offence.

 

On 23 October police were called out to deal with several cattle beasts roaming along State Highway 1, Kilmog. A member of the public reported the cattle late that night after clipping one of them and breaking the wing mirror on her vehicle. This is the fourth reported incident involving cattle roaming onto State Highway 1 around the Pryde Road, Porteous Road area. If the unfortunate were to happen and a person was injured or worse as a result of a crash involving a cattle beast then the owner of that animal may be held to account.

 

That's all for this month, take care.

 

If you require information regarding road conditions telephone Transit New Zealand on 0800 44 44 49. 

 

If you see anything suspicious or if you wish to speak to the police regarding any other matter you can contact us on 03 465 9127, or alternatively anonymous information can be passed on by calling Crimestoppers on 0800 555 111.  In emergencies dial 111.  Until next month, take care.


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Ā ā Ē ē Ī ī Ō ō Ū ū
From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media: voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff, Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand. All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished. If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".