Tuesday, 25 October 2011

Blueskin Mainly Music

By Jenny O'Neill

Wow, we are now into the fourth and final term of the year and spring
is well and truly upon us with all the beautiful blossoms and bulbs
blooming, as well as new life aplenty with all the spring lambs. Our
group also has three new babies born in the last month or so and there
are another two due anytime now. It is awesome seeing the older babies
becoming more interested and interactive during our music sessions and
really neat to see the older ones learn the words and actions to some
of the songs.

We are looking forward to seeing all the littlies when we start back
for a somewhat shorter term on 1 November. If you would like to join
us for a special time of interaction with your child/children using
music, rhyme and action with your little ones, followed by morning
tea, play and friendship please come along Tuesdays at 10am at Waitati
Hall. $2 per child or $3 per family.


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Ā ā Ē ē Ī ī Ō ō Ū ū
From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand.
All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public
domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished.
If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

Waitati Toy Library advert

Waitati Toy Library
Open Fortnightly
Saturday 10:30-11:30am
& Monday 6:30-7:30pm
@ Waitati Hall, Harvey Street
November 12, 14, 26, 28
for more info contact Frances at 482 1991
Our December dates are 10 and 12.

Saturday, 22 October 2011

Water a Basic Human Right or a Saleable Commodity?

by Geraldine Tait

The words Council Controlled Company do not usually create fear and
trepidation but when applied to our water and waste systems they make
me decidedly nervous.
A recent report in the Otago Daily Times said that millions of dollars
could be saved by moving water and waste to a CCC. We are already
paying a pretty big fee in our rates for these services and we are
well aware that there is a lot of pressure on the existing CCCs to pay
a sizable dividend to council each year. Water users in Auckland no
longer just pay the cost of supplying that water but their council has
added a surcharge which it uses to help pay for other expenses such as
roads. Personally I don't wish to contribute to a profit margin for a
CCC to help pay off the stadium debt. I am more than happy for City
Forests and other CCCs to be run as profit-making businesses but not
water and waste.
There are tax advantages in moving services to a CCC structure but
there are huge losses for our community. As citizens we would have no
direct input as to how they are run and councillors could not make
decisions about management of the services. Imagine if the libraries
became a CCC. The council could have a contract with the Library CCC
saying that they were to make library books available to the citizens
of Dunedin. How the Library CCC goes about doing this would be totally
out of the control of the councillors. If the CCC decided to reduce
the number of libraries, or the opening hours of libraries, or the
number of books available or the cost of borrowing a book, this would
be just too bad and complaining to the councillors or voting them out
at the next election would have no effect on the management of our
libraries.
You may have faith that a Water and Waste CCC would deliver the same
service as the council department has been doing but there are some
very detrimental changes that may result.
The council has looked at water metering in the past and with a CCC
this is pretty likely to be introduced. At the moment households use
however much water they need and generally there is enough to go
around except during very dry spells when some restrictions on outdoor
water use are instigated. Water metering means the more you use the
more you pay, that sounds fair but it disadvantages families and could
impact on people who have a garden. If you grow your own vegetables
you will know that it can take quite a lot of water over the summer to
keep plants happy.
It is also not a very big step from a CCC to total privatization, the
Dunedin City Council just sold Citybus, they did not have to consult
the community or give any explanation other than that it was losing
money.
Another likely outcome of a CCC is that every household will get a
separate water and waste bill just like a power bill. So people who
are presently renting will get a water and waste bill each month from
the CCC on top of their usual rent. I'd be really surprised if
landlords gave a rent discount to tenants because the landlords didn't
have to pay water charges as part of their rates any more.
It is also likely that staff would be fired to reduce costs. I would
not like to see our water guys made redundant because I think this
will to lead to a poorer service especially after hours or when there
is an emergency.
So when you read about a Water and Waste CCC and what a great thing it
will be, think again, we have a lot to lose. After all we have paid a
huge amount through our rates to get the major upgrades done. We need
to keep control and ownership of these essential assets.

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Ā ā Ē ē Ī ī Ō ō Ū ū
From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand.
All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public
domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished.
If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

BLUESKIN RESILIENT COMMUNITIES TRUST

by PJ Clarke

New Zealand has had a pretty good party over the last couple of
months. Now parties of a different nature are demanding our attention.
Politicians of various hues assure us that the way ahead for New
Zealand is a return to growth, unbridled consumption and continuing
reliance on old, dirty technologies. Such 'business as usual'
assurances are at best questionable and are arguably misleading and
dishonest, however seductive they may seem.

For an alternative, positive view of New Zealand's future, check out
Dr Janet Stephenson's article in issue 30 of the University of Otago
Magazine, available online at www.otago.ac.nz/news/otagomagazine/.

Janet, a Blueskin Resilient Communities Trust (BRCT) supporter, argues
that New Zealand has 'a huge opportunity to build on our natural
advantages'. One such advantage is our relatively high availability of
renewable energy. Initiatives like the Blueskin Energy Project (BEP)
give communities means to provide for their future energy needs by
pursuing energy efficiency and renewable generation under local rather
than corporate control. Other projects in the Blueskin area are
developing food and transport security.

A long-term BRCT goal is to facilitate autonomous local ventures
through the development of social enterprises. A social enterprise
delivers social and environmental outcomes but is organised and
managed as a business. This may be an appropriate model for the
Blueskin Energy Project.

The recent BEP Open Days demonstrated strong local interest in
sustainability and community resilience. Trustees involved in the
events were impressed by the turnout, the enthusiasm, and particularly
the quality of the questions, ideas, critiques and discussion
contributed by those attending.

The BRCT/BEP office at Waitati School receives regular enquiries about
energy issues. BRCT has submitted a funding request to the Dunedin
City Council to allow us to trial a Community Energy Advisory Service.
A DCC committee will consider the application in November. If the
application is successful, another staff member will join the BRCT
team.

BRCT supports the very successful Waitati Open Orchards group and
recently transferred funds applied for under the BRCT mandate into
WOO's control.

The Waikouaiti Coast Community Board contributed $862.50 to the
Blueskin Energy Project's recent community engagement. Trustees
appreciate WCCB members' interest in BRCT projects and their support
in the current difficult funding environment.

BRCT trustees have had much to celebrate this past month. Chris
Skellett launched a new book 'When Happiness is Not Enough' to great
acclaim and nationwide interest. Antony Deaker and Mikaela Wilson
celebrated the arrival of a healthy new addition to the Deaker-Wilson
household on 19 October. Well done to all!

As always, BRCT welcomes any feedback on its activities and offers of
assistance. One of the best ways to find out more about BRCT is to
talk with trustees, or contact Scott at the BRCT office. BRCT trustees
and officers are Lynnaire Johnston, PJ Clarke, Antony Deaker, Ross
Johnston, Tony Wilson, Gerry Carrington and Chris Skellett. Jeanette
Fitzsimons is the trust's patron. You can find out more about the
trust, including contact details, at: http://www.blueskinpower.co.nz/


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Ā ā Ē ē Ī ī Ō ō Ū ū
From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand.
All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public
domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished.
If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

Not Much in Life is Straightforward: My thoughts on our library

by Jackie Fanning

Libraries are great community places and should provide space for
passive recreation (e.g. reading books/magazines, checking internet,
listening to music, etc.). However, doesn't our Blueskin Bay Library
already (or could) do this?

Yes, our library is small but so is our community -- so why can't we
make do with what we have? I think we are a humble community -- so why
do we need a 'first class' facility? Yes, toilet provision needs
improving – but to say we badly need a new community meeting room –
really? I've attended/run meetings in the Waitati Hall Committee Room
and it is cosy, warm and perfectly situated next to the kitchen – it
just isn't new and flash.

I realise there has been community consultation on this project -- but
a lot has happened to world and local economies since that time and I
think people are more aware of the effects of living beyond our means
and bad management of money. There is only so much money – and those
who get it mean there are those who don't.

I think in recent years more people recognise that there are a number
of costs associated with project development (an obvious local example
here). I'm not going on about environmental costs (although of course
this is applicable) but there is a social (opportunity) cost. What is
spent in Waitati on a 'first class' improvement to an almost-adequate
facility is money not spent elsewhere on projects that can really make
a positive difference to communities whose needs are more urgent than
ours.

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Ā ā Ē ē Ī ī Ō ō Ū ū
From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand.
All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public
domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished.
If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

Opportunists of the Avian World

by Rosemary Penwarden

Seagulls, you would think, live and eat at sea, or at least beside it.
But a comment to my resident ornithologist about the small bunches of
black-backed gulls that have been flying inland over our house
recently, led to an explanation of what they were up to.

They were heading over to the rocky outcrops above Volco and the
reservoir above Sawyers Bay. Black-backed gulls nest in
October/November and so for the month or so before that they check out
the local prime real estate. The Volco outcrops are favourite; some
years Rabbit Island is popular, and 50 or so gulls often nest at
Evansdale. Black-backed gulls nest either in colonies or on their own.
Just like people, some prefer the urban throngs, others, solitude.
There is a big colony of a couple of hundred pairs at Merton at the
mouth of the Waikouaiti River. This year a couple of pairs have been
interested in the cliffs at Doctors' Point just past the caves. Inland
in Central Otago they nest on the braided rivers, up mountains, and
feed on the paddocks. There is a colony on top of Slopedown, the high
hill that overlooks the Southland plain to the west and the Catlins to
the east (the site of a soon-to-be-built wind farm owned by Meridian
Energy).

Pre nesting time, they also hang out with prospective mates, testing
for flakiness and finding out what they might get up to when their
backs are turned (in ornithological language it's called
re-establishing the pair bond).

Some black-backed gulls feed at sea on shoals of fish and squid,
others in marshes at low tide. There are those who roam the beaches
and pick up and drop clams, and others who feed in paddocks on worms
and dead lambs or whatever else is going. The real urban dwellers go
for the rubbish tips. Similar to human nutritional studies, it has
been shown that the chicks of these rubbish tip fast foodies are
thinner and more poorly feathered than their rural cousins. We have a
resident that flies ten metres above the Waitati stream each morning
looking for tasty little ducklings or eels. Unlike albatrosses, which
eat entirely at sea on squid, black-backed gulls can adapt to
anything. They are generalists, not too fussy about quality, as we saw
when they quickly discovered the oily burger patties spread along Mt
Maunganui beach a couple of weeks ago. They eat the eggs of terns and
smaller red-billed gulls. They attack oyster-catcher chicks. Round the
back of the Gardens New World once I watched in horror as one gulped
down a live sparrow chick that had been feeding on discarded
supermarket fare.

Once nesting has begun, chicks stay for a while in the nest – all
fluff and legs – but those in colonies move out, after a week or so,
into crèches. Black-backed gull chicks are awkward, sooty-brown and
smelly. They don't mind who feeds them and will have a go begging from
whoever comes near. Adults have to go and find their own chicks, and
there's the odd bit of playground bullying in the midst of it all. The
chicks fledge by about January. Young black-backed gulls look a bit
like spotty brown chooks. In their second year they start to look like
scruffy versions of adult gulls with teenage spots and a black end to
their tail. By the third year they are just like an adult, sleek white
with a black back, yellow beak and evil eye.

Our black-backed gulls are very similar to large seagulls worldwide.
This particular species occurs in Australia, South Africa, and South
America (circum Antarctica) as well as quite a few islands in between
like the Falklands. Elsewhere they are called kelp gulls.

They may be opportunists and their behaviour doesn't always endear
them to us, but black-backed gulls are a fascinating success story in
a world in which survival is becoming harder and harder.

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Ā ā Ē ē Ī ī Ō ō Ū ū
From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand.
All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public
domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished.
If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

WARRINGTON SURF LIFE SAVING CLUB

by Dawn Hope

The Warrington Surf Life Saving Club welcomes all visitors to our
beach, with life guards in 'residence' every weekend from 12 noon –
5pm commencing 5 November until 18 March 2012. We have got a busy and
exciting time ahead of us and we look forward to seeing you all on the
beach over the coming weeks.

Nippers
We held our open day on Sunday 30 October and now we are ready to
start the season. Nippers' practise (under 16s, under 14s, under 10s
and under 8s) starts Sunday 6 November at the earlier time of 10am.
We look forward to seeing all existing members on the beach as well as
welcoming new members. If you missed the open day come along any
Sunday from 10am; alternatively contact Mark Familton on 482-2712 or
Dawn Hope on 482-2787.

Beach fireworks and BBQ night: Saturday 5 November, 6.30pm 'til late!
Come along to our community beach fireworks and BBQ fundraiser. You
are welcome to bring your own fireworks and let them off in a
controlled environment (we will have first aid in attendance). There
will be a sausage sizzle, hot drinks and supper items for sale.
Everyone is welcome.

Venue available for hire
Our club rooms are available to hire for functions. Please contact
Simone Omipi on 482-1136 for more details and to check availability.

Wanted items – Can you help?
We are looking for a new oven for our clubrooms also a small caravan.
If you have either of these items surplus to requirements we would
love to hear from you. Please contact Pru Casey on 021-203 6263.

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Ā ā Ē ē Ī ī Ō ō Ū ū
From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand.
All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public
domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished.
If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

WAIKOUAITI COAST COMMUNITY BOARD

by Gerard Collings, Chairperson

A special thank you to those who provided comment through the
playground improvements consultation. It is pleasing to see that it
appears there will be additional equipment provided throughout our
area.
At our September meeting the Waikouaiti Coast Community Board (WCCB)
were pleased to confirm financial assistance from our discretionary
fund to Waikouaiti District Museum, POWA and Blueskin Resilient
Communities Trust.
The board also agreed to facilitate a fundraising workshop in order to
assist community groups with obtaining funding for community projects.
It is intended to hold a workshop early in the new year; community
groups and organisations interested in attending should contact one of
your board members.
By the time you read this the Dunedin City Council (DCC) should have
released Dunedin's draft Spatial Plan for public consultation. The
Spatial Plan is an overall strategic document that will provide the
council's vision for the next 30-40 years. It will feed into, guide
decision making, and provide overall strategic direction in areas such
as water, waste, roading/transport, recreation, parks and reserves,
and the DCC's District Plan. As such it is important that our
community make themselves familiar with the draft Spatial Plan and
participate in the consultation process.
DCC staff are to provide a public briefing session at 6.30pm on
Thursday 17 November in the 'John Brown' meeting room , East Otago
Events Centre, Waikouaiti. This meeting will allow staff to give an
overview of the draft plan and more importantly provide comment on
those aspects of the plan that relate to and affect our area. If you
wish to attend the meeting but are unable to do so as a result of
transportation issues, please feel free to contact any WCCB member and
we will endeavour to assist you with arranging transport.
It is expected that submissions on the draft Spatial Plan will close
in December; the actual date will be advertised once this is confirmed
by the DCC. Copies of the draft plan will be available at our local
libraries, from the DCC and through the council's website
http://www.dunedin.govt.nz/council-online/currently-consulting-on
The November WCCB meeting is at 5.30pm on 9 November 2011 at Karitane
Hall. Members of the public wishing to speak at the public forum need
to advise Jane Hinkley our Governance Support Officer (phone 474 3374)
before 12 noon on the day prior to the meeting.
Remember you can view the board's meeting agendas, reports and minutes
at either the Waikouaiti or Blueskin libraries or through the DCC's
website http://www.dunedin.govt.nz/your-council/council-minutes
Members of the board are only too happy to hear (by phone or email)
from members of the community about any issues within our area.

Board Contacts Home Work Mobile email
Gerard Collings (Chairperson), 4657604
4707494 0274848800 gerard.collings@xtra.co.nz
Alasdair Morrison (Deputy), 4822505 4822505 0274354384 info@calmarine.co.nz
Andy Barratt, 021890048 021890048 asbarratt@farmside.co.nz
Andrew Noone 4657157 0274301727 anoone@dcc.govt.nz
Geraldine Tait, 4822517 0212175492 gstait@clear.net.nz
Les Pullar, 4658138 0274358020 lesgwen.pullar@xtra.co.nz
Mark Brown, 4822833

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Ā ā Ē ē Ī ī Ō ō Ū ū
From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand.
All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public
domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished.
If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

Friday, 21 October 2011

Eastern Districts Athletics Club

By Ruth Porteous

An athletics club has recently been established in our area. It is
based at East Otago High School which has given permission to use
appropriate school equipment.
Work is being done on relocating gear from a previous eastern
districts athletics club to provide a greater range of equipment. The
club will affiliate to the Otago Athletics Association and will accept
both competitive and non-competitive members.
Junior members (14 and under) meet on Thursday afternoon from 3.30 -
4.40pm and senior members from 4.30 until 6pm.
Should you wish to know more, contact me in the evenings on 482 2849
or email cla@eohs.school.nz

Warrington Hall

By Ruth Porteous

Did you know that after World War II plans were made to build a
memorial hall in Warrington to honour the local men who gave their
lives? To help meet the cost of construction, a member of the
community, went door to door, once a week, collecting 2/6d
(approximately 25c) from each family. When the hall was completed and
opened in 1957, it was debt free.
Since the hall's completion, there have been some small changes to the
original structure. What was once a projection room and then a store
room is now the men's toilet and the ladies' toilet is where the
doctor's waiting room/hall cloak room was. These used to be "long
drops" toilets, which were outside, at the back of the hall.
The present doctor's room has been added in recent years, replacing
the consulting area which was in the meeting room at the back of the
hall. This was a separate room beside the kitchen, which has been only
marginally upgraded in recent years.
With the loss of the projection room, suitable storage area has also
been lost, so the committee has discussed extending the hall to
provide an easily accessible storage area. Kitchen facilities could
also be upgraded.
If you have an interest in being involved in this project or have
skills you are willing to share, come along to our AGM in the
Warrington Hall on Thursday 17 November at 7.30pm.
There is a piano in the hall that is looking for a good home. The only
cost associated with this will be for its freight!

Thursday, 20 October 2011

Blueskin Garden Club

By Lyn Hastie
Blueskin Garden Club met recently and enjoyed a walk around "Opeke" on
Doctors Point Road. What a wonderful, peaceful spot and right in our
backyard. Thanks to those who are responsible for turning a large
amount of gorse into such a piece of beauty.
After our walk we enjoyed looking at Daphne's piece of paradise.
Gorgeous rhododendrons, azaleas, spring flowers and blossom were a
sight to behold as were the tuis who have such a safe haven and
plentiful supply of goodies to enjoy eating. After a shared lunch we
held a short meeting to discuss the business.
Our next get together will be held in Waikouaiti. On 12 November we
will do a walk around the Hawkesbury Lagoon followed by a visit to an
iris garden. More details to follow by club email and the gardening
page in Friday's ODT. All welcome. Any queries to Lyne 482 2822 or Lyn
482 2896.

Random Acts of Beautiful Madness

It's cabaret time again and Ad Hoc Productions is putting on a big night of
Random Acts and Beautiful Madness at the Waitati Community Hall!
Ad Hoc Productions is the performing arts initiative and brainchild of Port
Chalmers local, Karin Reid, who collaborates with many diverse performers on
a project-by-project basis.
Ad Hoc Cabaret: Blackboard Sessions is a community-development project
that takes cabaret shows out to different Dunedin communities. The
first one was held in Port Chalmers
in September and was a great success.
The Waitati cabaret will be the second event and will feature the
Dunedin Jazz Workshop music ensemble, comedy skits and other random
acts throughout the night. There will be a few Waitati locals
performing alongside Ad Hoc Productions' collaborators and
other performers. Expect the unexpected throughout the night with a
smorgasbord of mystery offerings on Saturday 5 November, 8pm. Tickets
$15 adult / $10 unwaged (cash only). BYO food and drink.
Karin Reid, artistic director, Ad Hoc Productions, 027 392 8528


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Ā ā Ē ē Ī ī Ō ō Ū ū
From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand.
All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public
domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished.
If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

Warrington Surf Lifesaving Open Day

Sunday 30 October @ 12 noon
Come along and see what Warrington SLSC is all about
Take the opportunity to join our club and meet new friends
$1 sausage sizzle available
Everyone welcome!
Please contact Mark Familton on 482-2712 if you have any queries

Sunday, 16 October 2011

Waitati School: Silver Enviroschool

By the students of Room One 2011 Waitati School and Sue Roberts-Blyth (teacher)

You've seen it on our logo: Waitati School Enviroschool, but what does
it mean? To be an Enviroschool means that we care about the
well-being of the whole school, community and eco-system. It's all
about learning to support our environment so that it can also support
us.
We want to make our planet a better place.
The Enviroschools philosophy empowers us, the students, to make good
decisions about relationships with others and with our environment.
It is supported by the Dunedin City Council who administer the awards
system.
There are 5 main parts to being an Enviroschool and these are called
Guiding Principles. They are:
Empowered Students – we can make great changes in our school and our world
Learning for Sustainability – we teach and learn in a way that
involves everyone and has on-going results.
Māori Perspectives – we honour the tangata whenua in this land and
embrace tikanga Maori.
Diversity of People and Cultures – we welcome and cherish people and
ideas from around the world.
Sustainable Communities – we participate in our community and help to
make it the wicked, wonderful place it is.
In 2009 Waitati School achieved a bronze award as an Enviroschool.
Late in Term 3, 2011, we welcomed Jenny Neilson from the Dunedin City
Council to our school.
We talked with her about all the things we do, and together we
discussed what it takes to be a Silver Enviroschool. We wrote down on
paper 'leaves' all the things we do that relate to the five Guiding
Principles. Then we glued them onto a tree entitled 'Silver
Reflection'.
At the end of the morning we looked at all the things we are involved
in and agreed together that Waitati School is definitely a Silver
Enviroschool.
One of the things we do is our enviro-Friday rotation in which the
whole school splits into whanau groups. One group works in the garden
and harvests food, another group cooks the food and serves it for
lunch and the third group acts as roving reporters.
We are also involved in recycling programmes, whanau hui, hangi
planting, Matariki celebrations, stream monitoring, and community
events such as the Fireworks Night.
Recently some of our 'empowered students' have undertaken projects
such as reinstating the chicken coop, restoring memorial gardens and
designing new structures for the space where the old office block was.
Look out for our colourful teapots on the fenceposts around the
school. We each painted a teapot with artwork showing our past,
present and future as members of the Waitati community.
We also enjoy strong links with our school parents, our local
librarians, Blueskin Nursery, Ribbonwood Nursery, Orokonui
Ecosanctuary, Play Centre, BRCT, Te Whare o te Whanau Arohanui, DCC
Enviroschool Sector, University of Otago (see link
http://review.mai.ac.nz/index.php/MR/article/viewFile/212/227) and
gardening groups such as WOO.
We celebrated our Silver status at our end of term assembly. We are
so pleased to be recognized as a place that supports the Five Guiding
Principles and also as a welcoming and future-conscious school. A
huge thank you to all the wonderful people involved with us in the
project and especially the students of Waitati School.

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Ā ā Ē ē Ī ī Ō ō Ū ū
From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand.
All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public
domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished.
If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

The Chicks Project: Youth music tour comes to Waitati

by Michelle Anderton

A successful youth music project has been extended for a further 12
weeks and is now being produced by the Dunedin Fringe Arts Trust.
The Chicks Project, initiated in 2010 by Volunteer Otago, aims to
provide young musicians with the opportunity to perform at alcohol-
free events and to learn from music industry mentors. Funded by the
Alcohol Advisory Council (Alac) the programme involves 10 local high
school bands.
Director of the Dunedin Fringe Arts Trust, Paul Smith, said it is
important that the Chicks Project is kept alive: 'The feedback from
the bands was that they got a lot out of the project and were really
keen for it to continue. But it needed a new champion so the Fringe
Trust stepped in as we see this fitting our mandate to support
emerging artists.'
Initially based at Chicks Hotel in Port Chalmers, the Chicks Project
is now branching out to include other venues in Dunedin and East
Otago. Project Co-ordinator Michelle Anderton says that the bands were
ready for another challenge, and a tour to multiple venues in and
around Dunedin will take the project to a new level. 'The project is
very hands-on for the young people involved. They have to do a lot of
the organising and promotion themselves as that's
the best way to learn.'
The new Chicks Project is based around a three-day tour held at
Re:Fuel in Dunedin, The Firestation Theatre in Mosgiel, and the
Waitati hall. As well as the performing component there is a series of
workshops that include songwriting, performance, event management and
recording.

--
Ā ā Ē ē Ī ī Ō ō Ū ū
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Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand.
All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public
domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished.
If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

Friday, 14 October 2011

Police Community Report: September 2011

by Constable Jon-Paul TREMAIN

Tënä koutou katoa.
I thought it would be a timley reminder to property owners or anyone
thinking of renting out their address to remember that criminals or
others who wish to evade the attention of police will target
semi-rural and rural locations as a place to live; the isolation and a
smaller police presence are the main reasons for this.
One tactic police have noticed is that a landlord will be approached
by a female looking to rent an address. She presents well and may or
may not have children. There is no mention of a partner or associates
and almost always he is never present at a face-to-face meeting
between the parties. However, within a short time of the address
becoming tenanted a male figure appears on the scene; invariably his
associates begin to make appearances and the situation deteriorates
with issues arising such as on-going parties, noise complaints,
intimidation of neighbours, loud arguments, domestic violence, and
issues with destruction of property at the address.
My advice is that under no circumstances should a landlord rent an
address without a face-to-face meeting with the prospective renter.
Treat the process as you would a job interview, so have a series of
questions prepared. Insist on references and contact all referees
including the previous landlord. Establish clear boundaries such as no
sub-leasing of rooms at the address, and ensure that issues
surrounding animals are clearly understood. Insist on meeting all
parties intending to move to the address, including partners.
Information on referees and credit checks can be found through the
Department of Building and Housing by visiting
www.dbh.govt.nz/pub-pre-tenancy-index, and a criminal conviction check
through www.justice.govt.nz/privacy/#application. It is important to
note that the tenant has to authorise the release of his or her
criminal convictions history to the landlord by the Department of
Justice. Non-compliance with a request for any of these checks may be
an indicator that the tenant has something to hide.
A rental property is an investment, and I am sure most landlords want
a tenant who respects their property, the neighbours and the wider
community. Waikouaiti Police are happy to take any query in relation
to this subject and can be contacted on the number below.
If you require information regarding road conditions telephone Transit
New Zealand on 0800 44 44 49. If you see anything suspicious or if
you wish to speak to the Police regarding any other matter you can
contact us on 03 465 9127, or alternatively anonymous information can
be passed on by calling Crimestoppers on 0800 555 111. In emergencies
dial 111. Until next month, take care.

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