Tuesday, 23 November 2010

ADDENDUM on the ADDENDUM please add to WARRINGTON SCHOOL (column)

A big thank you to Blueskin Bay Library car, for providing a wonderful
service to Warrington School's students.

The Juniors enjoyed a nice sunny day at their Athletics in Palmerston
late in November. It's great to see how well our children did
competing in all the events. Well done to Elsa and Lola who
represented the school at the Otago Athletic Championships. It has
also been great seeing so many students involved in summer sports ­
Rippa Rugby, T­ball, Soccer and Surf Group.

WAITATI VOLUNTEER FIRE BRIGADE

By Deanne Burrell

 

Guy Fawkes Night has been and gone and we are happy to say that the Brigade was not called out to any fireworks related fires, so well done everybody in the Blueskin Bay community.

 

We would like to extend a thank you to the Warrington Surf Life Saving Club who challenged us to a game of softball at their recent open day. We would like to think that it was close-fought game but that may be stretching the truth a little. We look forward to another challenge (our choice) in the near future.

 

The countdown has now started for the Christmas and New Year Holiday Period. We want to see everybody having a safe and joyous time but would like to remind people of a few rules that need to be adhered to if you are planning outdoor fires. We don't like to spoil people's fun but if we are called to an outdoor fire and the correct procedures have not been followed then we are required to extinguish the fire. No fires are permitted on any beaches, The Warrington Domain or any DOC land. Also, no fires are allowed to remain alight after dark except those specifically issued for bonfires at New Year, Guy Fawkes or significant community celebrations.

 

Last month the brigade attended a motor vehicle accident on the Kilmog where a van had overturned. Injury to the driver from the accident was caused by unsecured items in the back of the van flying forward and hitting him. With the holiday period coming up we would like to reiterate the importance of having all items in your vehicle packed securely and making sure that every passenger is restrained by a seatbelt. 

 

A weightless tissue box, a music CD, a portable iPod, or even a petite pen might not seem like deadly objects. However, they sure can be during the impact time of a speeding motor vehicle crash. When a crash does occur, speed worsens its severity by increasing the energy of the impact. The higher the speed of the vehicle, the more severe the impact during the crashe's secondary collision. The secondary collision is when drivers and passengers make impact with objects inside the vehicle. That object can be a loose item that becomes a dangerous missile during the crash.

 

When a vehicle and all its contents, including passengers and objects, are travelling at speed, they have inertia which means that they will continue forward in that direction and speed (Newton's first law of motion). In the event of a sudden deceleration of a rigid framed vehicle due to impact, contents that are unrestrained inside the vehicle will continue moving forward at their previous speed. They will impact the vehicle interior with a force equivalent to many times their normal weight. During this frightening situation, a tissue box can transform itself into a heavy brick. It has been cited as the cause of death in at least one crash. And yes a petite pen can turn into a flying arrow or dart.

 

Thousands of individuals have been severely injured and killed in motor vehicles crashes primarily due to the secondary collision with an unsecured object in the vehicle. So, here is where prevention can be your lifesaver. To avoid these tragic situations from occurring here are  some tips to consider:

 

·         Something obvious but should never be underestimated: do not speed; to reiterate, the higher the speed, the heavier the object in a motor vehicle crash.

·        Ask yourself if it's a necessity for an object to be inside your vehicle. The more objects inside the vehicle, the greater the chance  they can strike victims as flying missiles in a crash; In other words, less is better.

·         Secure objects in the vehicle; store them in the glove compartment or boot.

 

We can all do our part so we do not become targets of flying missiles in crashes.

 

The Waitati Volunteer Fire Brigade would like to wish all residents of the Blueskin Bay community a verymMerry Christmas and a happy, safe, and prosperous New Year.




Blueskin Low Oil Commuting Group

by Virginia Toy
Blueskin Low Oil Commuting Group (BLOC) was launched with a bang last month during the Blueskin10:10:10 hikoi. Since then, we have been slowly growing in strength and extend a warm welcome to new members who have signed up to the mailing list in the last few weeks. Just a reminder that we have a few more vouchers for bike tuning from Browns Cycles to give away -- you have only to express interest in joining the list by emailing bloc@geology.co.nz.
 
The weather has been fickle in the last week; spells of rain starting at 4:30pm foiled my attempts to cycle home on a few days. This is where the mailing list can come in handy -- I just posted to the list looking for a lift home so I could ride on a nicer day. I'd really like to see the mailing list used for 'on the day' networking about cycling and other travel opportunities and hope others will get into the swing of this soon.
 
Also, if anyone is interested in providing details of their regular travel schedules to other BLOC list members, drop me an email and I will forward it on. Happy commuting!

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Ā ā Ē ē Ī ī Ō ō Ū ū
From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media: voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff, Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand. All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished. If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

Monday, 22 November 2010

Orokonui Ecosanctuary

By Sue Hensley
 
The eight kiwi released in November are exploring their new home and it seems that one of the favoured feeding grounds is the grassy areas near the main tracks at the top of the Ecosanctuary. I guess that it shouldn't be surprising since under the mat of long wet grass is soft moist earth and juicy grubs. What was surprising for me was how big the probe holes are that kiwi make when they push their beak right up to their head to reach their prey. It has also been really exciting to discover kiwi poo on the tracks and the guides have been down on their hands and knees to learn and identify its distinctive smell!
 
The upgrade of the top to bottom Valley Track is almost complete thanks to another helicopter drop of gravel courtesy of the Rotary Club of Dunedin. It has been a massive job and track ranger Craig Leach and many many volunteers over the last year have put in untold hours of heavy work. There have also been extensive changes to the route due to water problems on the old track. The new sections show off some beautiful old trees, including one part where John Barkla of the Botanical Society found a rare perching orchid (Drymoanthus flavus).
 
The Visitor Centre, designed by Tim Heath of Purakaunui, has recently won a prestigious architectural award. I think the birds, too, have given it the seal of approval with the pond award from the paradise ducks, the best nest place from the swallows and best fast food outlet (the exterior wooden blinds that house lots of spiders and insects!) from the fantails and bellbirds. It is also a great building to work in and not many people have such an amazing view from their workplace. Congratulations to Tim.
 
Christmas is nearly upon us and gifts and guided tour vouchers etc are available from the Visitor Centre shop. Visitor Centre and cafe are open every day 9.30 - 4.30. Orokonui facebook and www.orokonui.org.nz will keep you up to date with events.
 
A big thank you to those local volunteers who have dedicated many hours to the Ecosanctuary project. Thank you also to those who support Orokonui through memberships, visiting, attending events and such like. Places like Orokonui survive on your generosity. Merry Christmas to all and wherever you go, safe travelling.

Blueskin Playcentre

By Katie Bourne

"We love Playcentre... 'cos all our friends are here!" The Playcentre song is (going around in our heads!) a hit at the moment as it is part of our upcoming show and it's true, we have a lovely friendly group of children and parents at Playcentre. As well as playing dress-up, bug hunting, shopkeeping, swinging, singing and digging in the sand pit, our children enjoyed a visit from storyteller Kaitrin McMullen who delighted us with her puppets and stories. We also welcomed room three pupils from Waitati school who came to play with us. We had a great morning making clay Christmas decorations, bathing baby dolls, painting pictures, singing songs together, making bread and sharing morning tea.

In the future we are expecting a visit from the Willowbank Fire Brigade and hoping to go on a train ride. We are also moving. Our current building is no longer available to us so we have to move out. Waitati School has agreed that we can relocate there so there is much to be organised. We would like to extend/develop an existing classroom to include toilets, kitchen, office and fenced outdoor play area. One important aspect that funding bodies require is 'evidence of community support' - YOU CAN HELP!! Please write a letter of support for this venture - parents, grandparents, aunties, uncles, anyone who may use the new Playcentre now or in the future. Even old Playcentre users could write saying how valuable Playcentre has been in our community in the past. We need a Playcentre in Waitati! Letters can be posted to Mikaela Wilson (president) at 3 Ree St., Waitati.

Our next fundraising adventure is to help raise funds to move Playcentre to Waitati school. Please support us! We are organising a show called Tamariki Tiata - children's theatre. It is to be held in Waitati hall on Saturday 11 December. All local children are being encouraged to take part, so if you want to join in call Katie (465 8381 or 021 148 5535). Its going to be a fantastic afternoon of entertainment with a yummy cafe. Tickets are $5 per adult, Kids are free. If you can not make the show but are able to donate anyway - thanks! Tickets are available from the library.


OROKONUI ECOSANCTUARY column

OROKONUI ECOSANCTUARY


by Sue Hensley


The eight kiwi released in November are exploring their new home and it seems that one of the favoured feeding grounds is the grassy areas near the main tracks at the top of the Ecosanctuary. I guess that shouldn't be surprising since under the mat of long wet grass is soft moist earth and juicy grubs. What was surprising for me was how big the probe holes are that kiwi make when they push their beak right in up to their head to reach their prey. It has also been really exciting to discover kiwi poo on the tracks and the guides have been down on their hands and knees to learn and identify its distinctive smell!


The upgrade of the top to bottom Valley Track is almost complete thanks to another helicopter drop of gravel courtesy of the Rotary Club of Dunedin. It has been a massive job and track ranger Craig Leach and many many volunteers over the last year have put in untold hours of heavy work. There have also been extensive changes to the route due to water problems on the old track. The new sections show off some beautiful old trees, including one part where John Barkla of the Botanical Society found a rare perching orchid (Drymoanthus flavus).


The Visitor Centre designed by Tim Heath of Purakaunui has recently won a prestigous architectural award. I think the birds too have given it the seal of approval with the pond award from the paradise ducks, the best nest place from the swallows and best fast food outlet (the exterior wooden blinds that house lots of spiders and insects!) from the fantails and bellbirds. It is also a great building to work in and not many people have such an amazing view from their workplace. Congratulations to Tim.


Christmas is nearly upon us and gifts and guided tour vouchers etc are available from the Visitor Centre shop. Visitor Centre and café are open every day 9.30-4.30. Orokonui facebook and www.orokonui.org.nz will keep you up to date with events.


A big thank you to those local volunteers who have dedicated many hours to the Ecosanctuary project. Thank you also to those who support Orokonui through memberships, visiting, attending events and such like. Places like Orokonui survive on your generosity. Merry Christmas to all and wherever you go, safe travelling.





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Ā ā Ē ē Ī ī Ō ō Ū ū
From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media: voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff, Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand. All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished. If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

ADDENDUM please add to WARRINGTON SCHOOL (column)

We made the most of the tree trimming by creating clay fired pots in
the clean up bonfire. Many of the pots were made using local clay that
was dug at the edge of the beach and were fired in old metal bread
baskets. This was a great experience for all of us.

In the next few weeks we will be making the most of our swimming pool
and fun activity days including class trips to town, camping in the
school playground and cooking cockles on the beach.

Many thanks to all those in the community who have helped make our
year at Warrington school so fantastic!

Community Clean-up Days 2011

The Dunedin City Council advises that in 2011 skips will be available at the Warrington Domain for community clean-up days on the following weekends:12-13 February and 28-29 May.

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Ā ā Ē ē Ī ī Ō ō Ū ū
From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media: voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff, Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand. All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished. If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

Blueskin Bay Library: Change of Opening Hours

by Louise Booth
 
From Monday 6 December the opening hours of the Waitati Library will change to give a standard closing time of 6:00pm from Monday to Friday.  This will be easier for you to remember while still providing opportunities for you to call in to the library on your way home after work.  The new hours will be:

Monday        2:00 - 6:00pm
Tuesday       2:00 - 6:00pm
Wednesday  2:00 - 6:00pm
Thursday      2:00 - 6:00pm
Friday         10:00am - 12:00pm and 2:00 - 6:00pm
Saturday     10:00am - 1.00pm
 
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Ā ā Ē ē Ī ī Ō ō Ū ū
From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media: voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff, Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand. All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished. If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

Obituary

Tracy Kyle (1965 – 2010)

 

Tracy was a wonderful parent to Nick and Josie, and loved partner to Dennis. An involved member of the local community, she was a loyal friend and provided special 'counsel' - wise and intuitive, non-judgmental and very funny - she made us laugh lots!

 

Tracy's impish, perky grin and fierce drive said it all. It was Tracy who began calling our new Waitati Edible Gardening group 'the Weggies' – and suggested a particularly uncomfortable membership greeting as well! Vital and vibrant, full of life and laughter, intelligent and wise, kind, caring and compassionate, Tracy loved life and lived it to the full. 

 

Tracy attended Warrington Taekwando with Nick and Josie. She earned the respect of Senior Black Belts through her application and dedication, and of the juniors for her compassionate yet firm and precise pedagogy, always with a smile or laugh. Naturally, she earned her black belt, and earned the respect of New Zealand's Taekwando fraternity in the process.

 

She had a natural grace and style no matter the situation, whether socialising, or at work, and especially in gumboots on the farm. Tracy's cancer was virulent and unrelenting. In the ten months between diagnosis and her death she continued to go into work and shared the management of their home building project. She came to Weggie markets, attended friends' parties and threw her own big birthday party with flair.

 

Tracy loved her family so much. Her pride in her children was clear for all to see, and when the Kyle's hosted an Edible Garden Tour Tracy couldn't help but entertain visitors with stories of Dennis' garden exploits, all the while claiming that her job was only to survey it all, glass of chardonnay in hand.

 

Of course she was angry that she was dying, and angry she wouldn't be there to care for and support her family, to share in their successes and their failures, or to see the new house completed. But she was also astonishingly upbeat with those around her, even in her last days, such as advising a friend on how to deal with a dickey heart, while all the while battling herself. Tracy thought of others first.

 

As a successful businesswoman, with her business partner, she built a flourishing nursing business. She loved her work and the opportunities it gave her to use all her wonderful qualities and to make people's lives a bit better, a bit brighter. A Southland girl, who loved fishing, worked in town and lived in Blueskin Bay, Tracy had great friends around the country. Her nursing friends have many, many stories about Tracy during her nursing training.

 

Dennis talks about Tracy's passion for catching salmon off the treacherous 'Pudding Stone' on the peninsula, and of the privilege of nursing his partner and best friend. We all carry great memories of her in our lives, and she is strong in our thoughts. 

 

Our thoughts and best wishes are with Dennis, Nick and Josie.

Waitati Edible Gardeners

By Lynnaire Johnston

It has been decided! The dates have been booked! The venue arranged! Yes, the Waitati Edible Gardeners' Harvest Markets will be back next year.

The venue remains the same - the front porch of the Old Stores in Harvey Street. The dates will be February 20, March 20 and April 17 - all Sundays.

All producers of local food - whether a WEGie member or not - are welcome to have a stall at any or all of the markets. There is no charge.

A wide variety of locally grown produce, preserves, plants, herbs, juices and possibly even ducks will be on sale.

The markets run from 10am to midday.

Enquiries to 482 1364.

Extra Market for Christmas

By the editors


An extra Coast Road Market at Seacliff will be held the weekend before Christmas so we can all buy our gifts from local producers.


Always held on the first Sunday of each month, the additional market will be held on Sunday 19 December from 11am to 2pm.

 

Coast Road Market  is held in the grounds of Coast Road Retreat, alongside the Art Shed, at 728 Coast Road, Seacliff.

 

Experience a unique blend of food, coffee, art, craft, clothes, local produce, plants, preserves, bric a brac, books, toys and more!!

 

It's a free market so if you would like to have a stall, come along before 11am to set up. Or you can phone first on 465 7990 with any

queries.



Sunday, 21 November 2010

Note from the editors

This is the final issue of Blueskin News for 2010. The next issue will be published on 1 February 2011.
The deadline for receipt of copy for editorial and advertisements is January 22.
The editors of Blueskin News would like to take this opportunity to thank all the various community groups and individuals who have contributed articles and photos to Blueskin News during the year. Without your input, there would be no local paper and we confidently expect more of the same next year.
We wish you and your families a joyful, sunny and safe holiday season and look forward to being back in your mail boxes in February.

Blueskin Bay Working Breakfast

By Lynnaire Johnston

Following the success of the first Blueskin Bay working breakfast in October, a second was held near the end of last month.
Although considerably reduced in numbers, enthusiasm for the concept remained high, with its official purpose still to be decided. At the initial meeting there were two distinct schools of thought: that it should be a business networking group comprising businesses located in Blueskin Bay; while other attendees had a preference for it to have a more community project focus.
However, from the second meeting it seemed as if a third option could be emerging: a Bluekskin Bay Business Association. The meeting seemed mostly concerned about issues concerning local businesses. Community Board member Alasdair Morrison spoke about the potential of next year's Rugby World Cup to bring visitors to Blueskin Bay. He suggested that local businesses start thinking about how they could benefit from the increased numbers travelling through the area.
Also discussed was the number of recent burglaries and the need for additional vigilance by local residents.
The Blueskin Bay Working Breakfast is an initiative of the Blueskin Resilient Communities Trust and your input is sought on its future direction. Please email Lynnaire Johnston with an indication of your preferred option, as outlined above.
The next meeting will be held in February.
Lynnaire Johnston, lynnaire@wordwizard.co.nz

Blueskin Bayleaf

By Rowan Holt

Cherry and Gingernut Biscotti Cheesecake

 

I have a real soft spot for cheesecake and have started to practise this one ready for Christmas pudding. This recipe has been adapted from a recipe I found on a cream cheese packet. I have used the word biscotti in its literal form, Bi meaning twice and cotti cooked. Serve with Greek yoghurt or whipped cream.

 

1 1/4 c mix of Gingernut and malt biscuit crumbs

80g butter, melted

750g cream cheese, softened

3/4 cup caster sugar

1 1/2 t vanilla

2 eggs

200g Greek yoghurt or sour cream

400g jar cherries, drained, liquid reserved

dash of brandy

1 t grated lemon rind

1/4 c caster sugar, extra

2 t cornflour

 

Combine biscuit crumbs and butter. Press into the base of a greased 22cm round spring-form tin. Chill.

 

Beat half the cream cheese, 1/2 c sugar and 1 t vanilla until smooth. Beat in the eggs one at a time. Pour mixture into tin and bake for 20 min at 180. Cool for 5 minutes.

 

Beat the remaining cream cheese, sugar, vanilla and lemon rind until smooth. Then add the yoghurt or sour cream. Pour over the cooked base and bake for 10-15 minutes or until just a little wobbly in the centre. Remove from oven and cool. Chill.

 

Combine 1/4 of the cherry liquid with the cornflour to create a paste in a small saucepan on medium heat. Slowly add the extra sugar and the remainder of the reserved liquid and stir until the syrup has darkened a little and thickened.


Stir in all the cherries and the brandy, take off the heat. Cool.


Pour cooled cherry topping over the cold base and chill for at least an hour.

To serve, carefully remove the sides of the tin and present on a large plate. When you slice it you will reveal the four layers – base, cheese, yoghurt, topping – delicious!

 

 

 

WAIKOUAITI COAST COMMUNITY BOARD column

Photo: Les Pullar, Mark Brown, Geraldine Tait, Gerard Collings (Chairperson),
Andy Barratt, Alasdair Morrison (Deputy), Andrew Noone (Councillor)
Photo courtesy East Otago Review

WAIKOUAITI COAST COMMUNITY BOARD

by Gerard Collings

Well it's a new triennium and a new board.
First of all I wish thank the two retiring board members Murray Holland and
Nancy Higgins for the time and effort they have put in to serving
our community.

The board has a key role in presenting community issues and
concerns to the Dunedin City Council, it is also important that
the board actively identify, encourage, and assist with initiatives
that enhance the social, economic, and environmental well
being of our area.

Over the last few weeks members of the board have expressed a
very real desire to ensure that we engage and communicate
effectively with you the residents and ratepayers in our
community. It is intended that the board will hold two informal
public meetings early in the New Year (dates and venues to be
advised). In addition to the public meetings the board will be
looking to meet informally with special interest groups, businesses, and public and service organisations within our community.

At our November board meeting we set up two working groups:

1. Rugby World Cup: to develop a project plan/strategy for presentation to the Boards January meeting to enable the Board to assist our community in maximising the potential benefits of the rugby world cup. Members of the working group are Andrew Noone, Alasdair Morrison, and Gerard Collings.

2. Coastal scenic route: to develop a project plan/strategy for the creation and promotion of a coastal scenic route within our area. Members of the working group are Andy Barratt, Les Pullar, Mark Brown, Geraldine Tait, and Gerard Collings.

Members of the respective working groups are only too happy to hear (by phone or email) from members of the community that have suggestions relevant to the projects.

The Board's next meeting is 5.30pm 26 January at the East Otago Events Centre, Waikouaiti. Members of the public wishing to speak at the public
forum need to advise Jane Hinkley our Governance Support Officer (Phone 4743374) before 12 noon on the day prior to the meeting.

In addition to the public forum, Board members will be available to meet informally with members of the public between 4.30 and 5.30pm at the Events Centre on the day of the meeting.

Finally, we wish you all a safe and enjoyable festive season.


Board Contacts

Home

Work

Mobile

email

Gerard Collings (Chairperson),

4657604

4707494

0274848800

gerard.collings @xtra.co.nz

Alasdair Morrison (Deputy),

4822505

4822505

0274354384

info @calmarine.co.nz

Andy Barratt,

021890048


021890048

asbarratt @farmside.co.nz

Andrew Noone

4657157


0274301727

anoone @dcc.govt.nz

Geraldine Tait,

4822517


0212175492

gstait @clear.net.nz

Les Pullar,

4658138


0274358020

lesgwen.pullar @xtra.co.nz

Mark Brown,

4822011

4822011


blueskin @xtra.co.nz




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Ā ā Ē ē Ī ī Ō ō Ū ū
From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media: voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff, Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand. All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished. If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

WARRINGTON SCHOOL (column)

WARRINGTON SCHOOL

by school staff and parents

There has been an outbreak of Steampunk fever around the school after
the seniors returned from camp with this highly contagious disease
caught in Oamaru. The symptoms are an interest in Victoriana Punk
apparel with the addition of sci­fi styled weaponry. There
has also been a mutation of the fever with the addition of wacky
wheeled vehicles whizzing around the school – thanks to thoughtful
adults who have kindly donated pushchairs, motor mowers and tools.

Otago to Otara collaboration has begun. Room 1 are blogging about
their recent activities after being encouraged by students from Bairds
Mainfreight Primary School in Otara who have heard about what we are
doing. The BMPS students created a video on how to blog and posted it
on their class blog for us. The BMPS class aim to use the skills of
room 1 students to install an Ubuntu computer in their classroom early
in 2011.

In the meantime the BMPS students are assisting our school with
learning how to blog, distance is proving no barrier to collaborative
learning in this digital age. Room 1 pupils are also now teaching the
staff how to blog and with the creation of the Warrington School blog
site http://warringtonprimaryschool.blogspot.com/.

Congratulations to students who represented Warrington school at the
senior athletics last month. Superb effort from Lola and Elsa who have
been entered into the Otago Athletics Championships.

The middle school teaching position has been advertised and we are
hoping to have someone appointed to this position by the end of
November.

Dates
2 December: BOT Meeting
15 December: End of year assembly 1.30pm
16 December: End of Term 4

Saturday, 20 November 2010

Waitati Edible Gardeners

Community Garden Year Three Progress Report

 

By Rosemary Penwarden


There've been strange goings-on in Waitati since this community garden started. Anyone driving up Mt Cargill Road a few Tuesday evenings ago might have noticed eight people bent over little holes in the ground or forking steaming silage into piles, reminiscent of 19th century Irish peasants. With a small difference – Irish peasants didn't set up lines of orange bailing twine at ankle height to keep the rows straight. Even bright orange bailing twine is not easy to see when your arms are full of steaming rotting hay. T'was an accidental Irish jig you may have seen, as we tripped, hopped or tumbled into the pungent steaming silage. Luckily, the salsa dancers among us are quick on their feet. 

 

Other unusual behaviour has been noted; suddenly, dried cow 'paddies' (Irish for 'pats?) are difficult to resist, and community gardeners ('commies'?) may be spotted scooping them into sacks in the most unexpected places.

 

After a slow start enough spoilt hay came our way thanks to Yung Ko and Laurie Henderson, and the strong easterlies dumped a generous helping of kelp on the beach, also gratefully received. Garlic was planted in August and is growing well; onions in October, outcome less certain. Most of the potatoes are in and the pumpkins, far too big for their window sills, will be in the ground by the time December's Blueskin News goes to print. Note to next year's 'commies' – DO NOT eat all your best potatoes. Keep some for seed!

 

We have broad beans coming along too and left some of the winter's green crop to re-seed. Globe artichokes are dotted along the far side of the garden - we hope to get a nibble from them next year.

 

Anyone is welcome to join us at 6:30 on a Tuesday evening - deft footwork is not compulsory.  

 

(Ring Derek on 4822831 or email derekonley@yahoo.com)

 


 

 

  

 

 

BLUESKIN RESILIENT COMMUNITIES TRUST

 
by Scott Willis
 
Blueskin Resilient Communities Trust (BRCT) was established in 2008 to assist groups and individuals in Blueskin Bay communities address the opportunities and vulnerabilities associated with climate change and peak oil. Currently its main community project is the Waitati Energy Project and Blueskin Power. It is also currently providing umbrella service to Waitati Edible Gardeners, Get-The-Train, and Blueskin Low Oil Commuting, and seeks opportunities to foster community spirit and grow community capacity. BRCT currently has only one employee (myself); there are volunteers who help oil the BRCT machine (more of a simple and effective bicycle really), volunteers and contractors who run the initiatives BRCT helps with, a strong and passionate community that generously lends its experience and assets, and of course BRCT trustees and officers (Lynnaire Johnston, Antony Deaker, Simon Sheppard, Ross Johnston, Tony Wilson and Gerry Carrington), and our new patron, Jeanette Fitzsimons.

 

BRCT is now in the process of planning a move to new premises at Waitati School early in the new year. We've been strongly supported by Mark and Rayna Dickson since 2009 with office space in the Old Waitati Stores, and we still get people coming in the door asking, 'Are you a shop? What do you do here?'. This is Blueskin's first ever community office and while we currently have great 'main street' presence, the move to new premises is part of a longer-term strategy to streamline functioning, strengthen collaborative partnerships, build greater efficiency and provide hub services. We're very excited to be relocating to a dynamic community/school hub (with Waitati School growing further with the relocation of Blueskin Play Centre), while having the opportunity to share resources and information with greater ease. I am looking forward to this exciting new stage for BRCT and I want to thank Mark and Rayna for helping establish BRCT's first community office.

 

At the date of writing, BRCT is working on strategic planning to provide clear direction for the short, mid and long term. Planning will culminate with a BRCT strategic workshop, with all trustees, officers and staff, on the weekend of 27-28 November at Waitati School.

 

Meanwhile, on behalf of the trust and in conjunction with the Waitati School PTA, Laurence Hay is working on a long overdue community telephone directory. The ultimate community resource, once complete this will be made available for all Blueskin communities not covered in other directories. Of course for civil defence purposes it helps to have a local directory, but it's even more valuable in making it easy for us to be more connected and aware of who is in our own neighbourhoods, and how to get in touch (or get connected if we're new to the community).

 

Over summer I'll be hosting Seth Gorrie in the BRCT office.  Seth is doing some research on community perspectives around Blueskin Power and will have the office to use if needed.

 

More information on the trust's vision, mission, objectives and activities is available on the Transition Waitati webpage: www.transitiontowns.org.nz/waitati or by contacting me on 03 4822048.



 


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Ā ā Ē ē Ī ī Ō ō Ū ū
From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media: voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff, Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand. All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished. If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

WAITATI ENERGY PROJECT: Blueskin Power – an integrated energy community.

 
by Scott Willis
 
Community Consultation
 
Community discussion on how best to include everyone and assess the most helpful community turbine information will be held on 30 November at the next Waitati Energy Project (WEP) meeting -- potentially before you read this. While we still have no word on our funding request for comprehensive community consultation there is a research project now under way that will provide an opportunity to uncover what important questions about the community turbine are still to be answered. Seth Gorrie, who many of you may remember from his work in Blueskin Bay last year, is working over the summer researching 'Community Perspectives around Blueskin Power'; so don't be surprised if he knocks on your door.
 
Blueskin Power
 
Initially Blueskin Power referred to the community turbine project. It has developed subsequently as a response to feedback at the last WEP meeting, and to the greater potential in integrating other energy work, to mean 'an integrated energy community'. It is already more than an idea as we have been working in an integrated way for a while, but what Blueskin Power does make explicit is the value of including small wind (such as Powerhouse Wind's Thinair turbine), solar installs, smart meters, insulation, intelligent design and more, in the vision encapsulated by the community turbine. We are lucky that the distinct section of local grid we inhabit also expresses our wider Blueskin community. And the value to the community of integrated thinking has already been experienced (for example, in the 2009 WEP retrofit rollout) with further action in the pipeline. An even greater value, I believe, is available for the rest of the country, as we prove that an integrated approach to energy is also an excellent opportunity to promote and test green technology, and to demonstrate the effectiveness of collective action, while building a model for other communities.
 
So in November and December I'll be reporting on lessons learnt and seeking input from around NZ. On 24 November I'm presenting at the Otago Energy Research Centre Symposium in Dunedin. On 9 December I'm presenting at a Wellington 'Behavioural Innovators' Workshop'; and on 11 December I'm participating in an 'Energetics and Informatics' symposium in Whanganui.
 
Overseas student hosting opportunity
Then in February we have Xavier, a 20-year-old student in the European Business Management bachelors' degree programme, arriving from Belgium to spend 13 weeks with us looking at the business side of our project. Are you interested in hosting an overseas student? Xavier is a non-smoker, a friend of animals, loves music, and will happily fit in with a family interested in experiencing another culture. Xavier can contribute towards hosting costs. For more information contact Scott – see below.
 
Remember, more regular updates are sent out via the WEP update email, and you can contact me directly either at 03 4822048 / 0274888314 or at waitatienergy@gmail.com. Have a great Christmas and relaxing summer holidays and make the most of that sun.
 
 
Ā ā Ē ē Ī ī Ō ō Ū ū
From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media: voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff, Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand. All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished. If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".
 
 
 

Friday, 19 November 2010

WARRINGTON TAE KWON DO

by Meaghan Kelly

This last month at Warrington Tae Kwon Do has been fairly exciting.
Three members attended a grading at Port Chalmers -- the usual testing
mix of sparring, patterns, self defence demonstrations, and exercise,
exercise and more exercise. Congratulations to Christine Rainbow,
Imogen Corbett and Lucan Willis, who did themselves and all of us
proud by passing to a very high standard. Christine graded to yellow
belt, green tab, and Lucan and Imogen graded to green belt, blue tab –
halfway to black belt.

Also this month Paul Foley and I attended a poomsae (patterns) seminar
in Wellington with Master Ky-tu Dang, a Vietnamese-born, Danish tae
kwon do tenth dan. We spent three entire days learning about and
practising patterns the way they are performed and judged in
international competitions. It was exhausting physically and mentally
but extremely enjoyable, and it was great to see so many familiar and
new faces from all over New Zealand.

Tae kwon do continues over the school holidays with a short break of
around two weeks over Christmas and New Year (exact dates to be
decided), so please come in to Warrington Memorial Hall on a Monday or
Wednesday 6:00 to 7:30pm and give it a try. Great for fun, for
fitness, new skills and to meet great new people. First month is free
(and after that it is ridiculously cheap).

Contact Paul Foley 478 1113, Tim Bain 021-1672510 or Meaghan Kelly
027-8487913/4731199 for more information.

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Ā ā Ē ē Ī ī Ō ō Ū ū
From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand.
All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public
domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished.
If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

LOCAL MP (notice)

LOCAL MP

Pete Hodgson MP will not be running any MP Clinics during December or
January.  They will resume in February.

Thursday, 18 November 2010

COMMUNITY GARDEN

COMMUNITY GARDEN
Year Three Progress Report

by Rosemary Penwarden

There've been strange goings-on in Waitati since this community garden
started. Anyone driving up Mt Cargill Road a couple of Tuesday
evenings ago might have noticed eight people bent over little holes in
the ground or forking steaming silage into piles, reminiscent of 19th
century Irish peasants, with a small difference – Irish peasants
didn't set up lines of orange bailing twine at ankle height to keep
the rows straight. Even bright orange bailing twine is not easy to see
when your arms are full of steaming, rotting hay. 'Twas an accidental
Irish jig you may have seen, as we tripped, hopped or tumbled into the
pungent silage. Luckily the salsa dancers among us are quick on their
feet.

Other unusual behaviour has been noted: Suddenly, dried cow 'paddies'
(Irish for 'pats?) are difficult to resist, and community gardeners
('commies'?) may be spotted scooping them into sacks in the most
unexpected places. After a slow start enough spoilt hay came our way,
thanks to Yung Ko and Laurie Henderson, and the strong easterlies
dumped a generous helping of kelp on the beach, also gratefully
received.

Garlic was planted in August and is growing well; onions in October,
outcome less certain. Most of the potatoes are in and the pumpkins,
far too big for their window sills, will be in the ground by the time
December's Blueskin News goes to print. Note to next year's 'commies'
– DO NOT eat all your best potatoes. Keep some for seed.

We have broad beans coming along too, and left some of the winter's
green crop to re-seed. Globe artichokes are dotted along the far side
of the garden -- we hope to get a nibble from them next year.

Anyone is welcome to join us at 6:30 on a Tuesday evening -- deft
footwork is not compulsory.

(Ring Derek on 482 2831 or email derekonley@yahoo.com)



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Ā ā Ē ē Ī ī Ō ō Ū ū
From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand.
All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public
domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished.
If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

LOCAL BUSINESS PROFILE: Most Able Maiden

by Ara Nokomis

When I walk into a new home with the intention of enhancing it
specifically for you there are a few things I am opening to: I want to
know what bothers you when you enter your home after a hard day's
work. What is it you don't want to see or think about to have to do in
order for you to relax into your home? What are the things that create
chaos in your mind (and they are generally little things) that add up
to that mental block, inhibiting your relaxation in your own sanctuary
-- your home?

Cleaning for me entails many things: Order is what I do first, if
necessary, as this is the base for harmony -- a place for everything
and everything in its place. Then it's general surface cleaning
(including inside and outside of cupboard doors) of the kitchen,
lounge/dining areas, bedrooms, bathrooms, toilets, also the windows of
the kitchen, or any stunning or general viewing places, any entrance
doors/windows, skirting, door surrounds, mirrors (for a clear image of
oneself).

Generally, extra windows (inside and out), leather furniture
polishing, any specialist antique polishing, etc, require dedicated
sessions and call for extra time.  I like to schedule these as focus
sessions or seasonal tasks, as these are more specific needs.

I cater for the individual and what your specific needs are. If you
leave the dishes, I will see they are done, as I feel this an
important aspect for the overall sense of order and peace
for when you return home. If you are fighting a losing battle with
endless washing, I will help you get on top of this. Spider-webbing on
the outside of the house, high dusting, almost anything goes.

I have all my own equipment, and make my own cleaner from household
ingredients which is versatile and leaves a lovely atmosphere in your
home.

Visit my website -- www.mostablemaiden.co.nz

WAITATI OPEN ORCHARDS

WAITATI OPEN ORCHARDS
A growing branch of the Waitati Edible Gardens Group

by Jason Ross

Waitati Open Orchards (WOO) is a group of keen folk on a mission to
plant fruit trees in public spaces around Waitati for all to enjoy.
Email waitatiopenorchard@gmail.com to join our mailing list.

It's been a dry spring, but even our late planted trees are doing
well. Some of the WOO blokes put in some hard yards during November
growing mo's for Movember. Check out the Movember website and join the
Bio Mo Growers team next November!

December and January: Keep up the water to young trees if the usual
December drizzle fails to arrive! Keep up thinning of fruit to ensure
a quality crop. From mid-December you can start summer pruning of
established trees. Winter pruning has the effect of encouraging strong
growth of branches and trunk, so is good for young trees or where you
want replacement growth in older trees, whereas summer pruning slows
the tree's growth and encourages flowering and fruiting, so is used
for established vigorous trees only. It is especially good for keeping
espalier trees in shape, but I find it very useful for training all
fruit trees. It is also very useful for keeping gooseberries and
worcesterberries in an open shape.

Summer pruning of fruit trees consists mainly of shortening extraneous
new growth back to fruit spurs -- that is everything that isn't to be
a future branch. If there isn't room for fruit to form on a spur in
that part of the tree then cut the new growth right out. Older
branches can also be removed if desired. Summer pruning is great for
cutting out suckers (water shoots), especially in plums, because the
re-growth won't be so crazy as it can be after winter pruning.

Some folk like to cut out the blackcurrant branches with fruit on and
take them inside to pick the fruit off. This slightly different summer
pruning makes room for the developing new shoots which will bear fruit
next year, so cut the branches off nice and low. Similarly you can cut
raspberry canes to the ground once they have fruited, leaving room for
new growth. New shoots on raspberries are best thinned to the
strongest, well-spaced canes.

Other advantages of summer pruning are that cutting out unwanted new
growth allows light and air into the tree to ripen the fruit, there is
less chance of silverleaf disease during dry summer weather, and a
plant in active growth heals very quickly.

Contact us or look out for posters for our late January Summer Pruning
Workshop. See you there.

Jason Ross, 4822625. Waitatiopenorchard@gmail.com

Wednesday, 3 November 2010

Constable warns trail riders

As summer approaches, Waikouaiti Police Constable Jon-Paul Tremain is
concerned that more of us will be riding trail bikes.

"With more people using the beach, public reserves and gravel back
roads to ride their trail bikes, I think it is timely to remind
everyone what their responsibilities and rules are," Jon said.

"The Land Transport Act 1998 says a 'road' includes a street, a
motorway, a beach, and a place to which the public have access,
whether as of right or not. Which in broad terms means if a vehicle
can be driven on it, then it could be defined as a road."

Jon explained that all vehicles being driven on a road must have a
current warrant of fitness and be licensed to be on the road, and all
drivers orriders of vehicles on a road must have a current New Zealand
Drivers licence suitable for the vehicle they are in control of.

In addition all driver and vehicle related offences that can be
committed on a road can be dealt with by police and the consequences
vary from the issuing of infringement notices to the impoundment of
vehicles and drivers or riders being put before the Court for
offending such as drink-driving or dangerous driving.

"Local police are going to monitor this issue during the summer
months," John warned. "I would strongly urge those riding their trail
bikes in these places to take care not to annoy or endanger other
members of the public. If children are going to use trail bikes in
these areas I recommend it is only done under strict adult
supervision."

Police will act on any information received regarding rider behaviour
and anyone caught committing offences or causing annoyance in public
places such as sports grounds or Dunedin City Council reserves, may
find themselves receiving trespass or infringement notices.

Jon has a reminder for the festive season. "The end of the year brings
its own pressures and temptations, set realistic goals for Christmas
time and always make suitable arrangements regarding transport if
consuming alcohol."

*road conditions: 0800 44 44 49

*Waikouaiti Police: 03 465 9127

*Crimestoppers on 0800 555 111

*Emergencies: 111

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Ā ā Ē ē Ī ī Ō ō Ū ū
From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand.
All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public
domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished.
If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

Tuesday, 2 November 2010

Latest Gallery on Blueskin exhibition

Gallery on Blueskin invites you to the opening of two shows this Friday night


"Return"

Paintings by Rachel Hirabayashi (until 21 November)


"Shellter"

New work by Blueskin Bay artist Karan Snow


Opening from 6pm: Drinks and nibbles

Monday, 1 November 2010

Waitati Fire Brigade vs Warrington Surf Life Saving Club Inaugural Annual Softball Match

Two voluntary community service groups came head to head on Sunday 31
October at the
Inauugral Annual Waitati Voluntary Fire Brigade vs Warrington Surf
Life Saving Club Softball Match. The teams enjoyed near perfect
conditions at Warrington Domain following the opening day of the Surf
Club who now have their flags up for voluntary patrols for the next 20
weekends of summer noon - 5pm.

Few beach goers braved the waves today
apart fron the hardy life gaurds who swam the channel and brushed up
on their Life Guard skills for the season.

With 55 life guards on the Warrington patrol roster, the Fire Service
were outnumbered but still strong. Clearly the softball prowess was
held by the Fire Service but
the stamina and fitness of the younger life guards awarded victory to
the surf life savers after a bitter battle.

Charlotte Ibbotson, Warrington life-saving coordinator is pictured
shaking hands with trainee firefighter and softball captain Nick
Berends of Waitati Volunteer Fire Brigade.

Brent Bell, clearly a seasoned pitcher delivers the ball to Byron
Dodge (in red life guard jacket) and to Mark Buckley (Life Guard in
yellow shirt). Lance Ormsby is the Umpire and Rhys Bell is the Fire
Brigade catcher.

Photos by Pru Casey
Warrington Surf Life Saving Club

Tuesday, 26 October 2010

Waitati School After-School Bus or Care Consultation

By Antony Deaker

We've been thinking about how to ensure that everyone in the community
has access to the local school and the barriers that exist for some
families. We have come up with a couple of possibilities and would
like some feedback before we explore either (or both) possibility
further.

Would you use either of the services listed below?

Option 1: A 'bus' into town at 3pm
This bus would travel to a central point from which you can collect
your children at a given time. There would be a cost, yet to be
decided, perhaps around the $3 mark. You would need to book a ride in
advance but would not need to commit to five days a weeks, or even
necessarily a regular day. The logistics of this will need to be fine
tuned but at this stage we are looking at whether this service would
be of assistance to you.

Name:
We currently have children at Waitati School: Y / N
We live in the area and are considering sending [ ] children to
Waitati School.
Our children currently attend another school: Y / N
We would not use this service: [ ] (tick if appropriate)
We would use this service: weekly / fortnightly / daily / a couple of
times a week (please circle)
How many children does this apply to?

Option 2: An After-School Care Programme
Based at Waitati School, this service would operate from 3-5pm. There
would be a cost involved as per other after-school care programmes.

Name:
We currently have children at Waitati School: Y / N
We live in the area and are considering sending children to Waitati
School: Y / N
Our children currently attend another school: Y / N
We would not use this service: [ ] (tick if appropriate)
We would use this service: weekly / fortnightly / daily / a couple of
times a week (please circle)
How many children does this apply to?

We are also open to extending these possibilities to pupils at
Warrington School if there is enough interest.

Please detach this form, complete and return to Waitati School to
ensure that we get the best possible information to inform our
decision.

Waitati School Column

By Antony Deaker

In this column, the school has a new roof and new classroom furniture,
BoT to get intensive training, community consulted after dinner,
families checking out school welcomed, sporting success, bonfire
proceeds go to class resources, Quiz Night coming soon, art exhibition
and film project.

Making the decision about which school best meets the needs of your
child is a really important one. It needs to feel right. Our
principal, Heidi, is open to people coming and getting a feel for the
place. This might take one visit or it might take a few. The more
comfortable your child and family are with the school, the smoother
the transition will be. Contact Heidi by phone (482 2888) or email
(principal@waitati.school.nz) to make a time to visit.

By the time this is published we will have had another community
pot-luck dinner, this time followed by a discussion on values and
vision for the school. If you weren't able to make that event please
use the school website or get in touch with any of the BoT or staff to
share your ideas. We also hope you will take time to respond to our
survey about after-school care or bus service, in this publication or
on our website.

We now have a new roof over the main block at school, funky new
classroom furniture, painters booked for the summer break to repaint
the exterior and we expect to have completed many alterations to the
interior of our classrooms by the time term one, 2011 starts.

The BoT has been glad to book a weekend of intensive governance and
strategic planning workshops for later this month. We see this as an
invaluable opportunity to strengthening the school's performance. The
BoT is excited about entering a potential relationship with Ngai Tahu
to run a school banking programme for the pupils. We are also in talks
with the Blueskin Playcentre and Blueskin Resilient Communities Trust
about the relocation of both of those organisations into the school.

The PTA are using proceeds from the Bonfire Night to leverage further
funding to purchase new resources, toys and equipment for the
classrooms. The pupils have made their wishes clear and can look
forward to a few early Christmas presents. Further funding for the BMX
track has been confirmed and work is likely to start soon on its
installation. The PTA have announced 19 November as the date for the
next Quiz Night, this was lots of fun last year when Waitati
generously let a team from Warrington win.

Our pupils have been busy on numerous fronts. The seniors are well
into their film-making project having met with a producer and started
devising stories. The whole school has held an exhibition of pupils'
work at Gallery on Blueskin which looked fantastic. Many thanks to the
Gallery for its support with this! The Futsal, Rippa and cricket teams
all opened their seasons with wins. And, finally, a special note of
thanks to Tuihana and Jacob who played very well for North East Valley
School in the first week of cricket.

Sunday, 24 October 2010

Blueskin Resilient Communities Trust

By Scott Willis

Exciting news! Jeanette Fitzsimons, a great friend of Blueskin Bay and
many time visitor, has accepted a new role as our BRCT patron.
Jeanette's support gives profile to our ambition to run a resilient
local energy system – and pioneer this nationally for New Zealand.

What is just as exciting in Jeanette's support is the link BRCT will
establish with other nationally significant issues while maintaining
our real Blueskin focus. BRCT has grown further with emeritus
professor Gerry Carrington joining the trust and providing a 'bridge'
with our close partner, the Otago Energy Research Centre and the
University of Otago. Simon Sheppard has also joined as BRCT treasurer,
with the trust now consisting of Lynnaire Johnston (chair), Antony
Deaker (secretary), Simon Sheppard (treasurer), Ross Johnston, Tony
Wilson and Gerry Carrington. Trustees and officers provide excellent
governance for BRCT and are good people to talk to if you want to find
out more about BRCT or just what it is that BRCT does and can do.

The word out is that the inaugural Blueskin Bay Working Breakfast
meeting on the 15th of October was a huge success. Jenny Haydon is the
co-ordinator and would be thrilled to hear of others working locally
who would like to attend the next breakfast. Contact Jenny on 4821409
(or see advertisement).

I was blown away by the Blueskin 101010 event (the 10th of October).
BRCT can support crucial actions like this but without the passion and
ability of people like Carl Scott and Virginia Toy and all the others
who co-ordinated walkers, the community get-together, provided great
music, or created great local food, computer revamps, gardened and
planted, etc, nothing could be achieved. That so much was happening on
one of the most atrocious spring days we've had is testament to the
power and adaptability to our greater Blueskin community and certainly
something to be celebrated! The launch of Blueskin Low Oil Commuting
and renewed interest in the W3 Rideshare scheme are just two outcomes
from the day.

Meanwhile, our Angel Volunteer programme is being developed by
Laurence Hay for BRCT. It is also exciting to keep hearing and seeing
the Weggie initiatives producing results both in building greater
links between each community around Blueskin Bay and their respective
youth at the three enviroschools, and in enriching our neighbourhoods
and streets through the Waitati Open Orchard initiative.

More information on the Trust's vision, mission, objectives and
activities is available on the Transition Waitati webpage:
www.transitiontowns.org.nz/waitati or by contacting me on 03 4822048.


--
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Ā ā Ē ē Ī ī Ō ō Ū ū
From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand.
All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public
domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished.
If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

Saturday, 23 October 2010

WARRINGTON SCHOOL (column)

WARRINGTON SCHOOL

by school staff and parents

Warrington School has featured in the Enviro Schools short movie along
with other schools in Dunedin.

Warrington has become an international case study for The Free
Technology Academy (FTA)
which is funded by the European Commision. They are documenting our
educational use of Free Software and Open Standards.

Blueskin Bay FM continues to beam live 24/7 out across the bay. There
is some emerging talent evident in the shows that are being broadcast
and senior pupils are beginning to take a more active involvement in
the managing of the station, creation of jingles and sound
engineering.

There has been a keen interest by senior pupils in creating
trolleys/go-carts. They are looking for donations of bolts, nuts,
springs, cushions, washers, axles, pipes, wood, pedals, bike handle
bars. tools, small motors, wheels, leather straps, prams.

Thursday 4 November: BOT Meeting
Mon 8 – Wed 10 November; ERO visit
Wednesday 10 November: Junior Athletics
Friday 12 November; Junior Athletics Postponement
Saturday 20 November: Friends of Warrington School dance
Thursday 2 December; BOT Meeting
Wednesday 15 December: End of year assembly 1.30pm
Thursday 16 December: End of Term 4

Waterway restorers post a plea to stakeholders

Waterway restorers post a plea to stakeholders

by Laura Blake and Peter Dowden

Donations of fencing materials such as wooden fence posts and iron
stakes are being sought to protect a replanted Warrington stream bed.

The replanting on Church Creek near the Esplanade on '101010' Day was
a great success with about 100 trees, shrubs and flaxes planted. The
weather cooperated by giving the plants a heavy dumping of rain just
as we finished.

The Warrington Wellbeing Waterways group ran a raffle last month. This
will help to fund the cost of the fence needed to prevent stock
entering the creek and eating the vegetation.

The upper part of the creek that surfaces in the farmland will need to
be fenced and planted too.

Gardeners with native seedlings can bring them along to Warrington
School (there are pots behind the office if any one needs them for
their plants). Fence posts and stakes can be dropped off here too. The
replanting team will let plants grow big and strong before planting
them alongside the stream.

--
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Ā ā Ē ē Ī ī Ō ō Ū ū
From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand.
All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public
domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished.
If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

Warrington Surf Life Saving Club (column)

Warrington Surf Life Saving Club

by Dawn Hope

Photos: Eilis & team getting gold medal
Immy & Carla getting gold medal
Eilis & team getting gold meda

It's that time of year again and we are pleased to advise that
Warrington Beach will have life guards patrolling each weekend
commencing Sunday 31 October. We have got a busy and exciting time
ahead of us and we look forward to seeing you all on the beach over
the coming weeks.

Open Day - Sunday 31 October from 12 noon

Come along and sign up for this season. Meet up with old friends,
enjoy a BBQ, have fun participating in beach activities and sandcastle
competitions – even take a ride on an IRB (weather dependent of
course!) Tell all your friends - we look forward to seeing you there.
If you miss Open Day come along any Sunday from 11.30am -
alternatively contact Mark Familton on 482-2712 or Dawn Hope on
482-2787.

Following the Open Day, you can watch the annual Firefighters versus
Surf Life Guards sporting match; this year they are playing softball,
starting at 2pm.

Beach Bonfire & BBQ Night – Friday 5 November 7.30pm til late

Come along to our community Beach Bonfire and BBQ fundraiser. You are
welcome to bring your own fireworks and let them off in a controlled
environment (we will have first aid in attendance). There will be a
sausage sizzle, hot drinks and supper items for sale. Everyone is
welcome.

U19 Patrol Teams Competition – Sunday November 7 - 9am at Warrington Beach

Warrington SLSC will be hosting the Patrol Teams competition this
season. Teams of six life guards will pit their skills against other
clubs to compete for a trophy and a chance to travel to compete
against other regions.

Venue available for hire

Our club rooms are available to hire for functions. Please contact
Hannah Randall on 482-1141 for more details and to check availability.

Congratulations to WSLSC members Immi and Eilis Doyle and Jack Turner
who travelled to Wellington to compete in the 2010 State New Zealand
Pool champs. Immi and partner Carla Laughton (St Clair SLSC) won
gold in the Open Womens Line Throw while sister Eilis won gold in the
Under 13 Mixed 4x50m Obstacle Race. Jack came 3rd in the 200m LC
Freestyle course with obstacles, 4th in the 4x50m relay event and 4th
in the 4x50m obstacle relay event.

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Ā ā Ē ē Ī ī Ō ō Ū ū
From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand.
All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public
domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished.
If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

10/10/10 climate change hikoi and launch of BLOC

By Lucy Sheppard

The morning of Sunday 10 October dawned clear and bright with not a
breath of wind, perfect for a quick cycle over the hill to Dunedin and
back ... YEAH RIGHT!!!

Motivated, enthusiastic, rugged-up cyclists which included Paul
(unicyclist), Virginia, Julia, Scott and myself (unicyclists with a
training wheel) meet in the pouring rain at the Waitati Hall to embark
on a journey to Dunedin and back without the use of fossil fuels, as
part of the climate change hikoi 10.10.10.

Arrogantly believing that two wheels would be faster than one we sent
Paul off an hour before the bicyclists in order that we would all
arrive into Dunedin at the same time. So, at 10.30 the four bicyclists
set off (surrounded by thunderous applause from the Waitati walkers)
in hot pursuit of the long legged, one wheeled wonder.

Deciding it was not a day for the grunt of Shortcut Road, we meandered
past Waitati School warming up our legs for the climb ahead. Amazingly
oblivious to the weather and the gradient (due I am sure to the fine
conversation being had) we quickly made it to the warm, welcoming
VOLCO farm house where we were fed hot tea, biscuits and waffles!
Hearing from these lovely ladies that Paul was already more than half
an hour ahead of us we set off in hot pursuit once again, pinning our
hopes on the weight of the waffles in our tummies aiding our descent
into Dunedin. Alas, we rounded the corner on the downward approach to
be met with a malicious head wind and our dreams of land speed records
were dashed as we found ourselves pedalling downhill!!

Shortly before the scheduled arrival time of 1pm we finally caught up
with the long legged, one wheeled wonder relaxing at Dunedin North
Intermeditate where he had been waiting for us for an hour already. We
believe Paul may be the first person crazy enough to unicycle from
Waitati to Dunedin; a huge achievement especially if you consider you
cannot free wheel on a unicycle so it involves not only pedalling up
the hill, but pedalling down the hill, too.

We rested in the warmth of the DNI hall, eating our lunches made from
locally sourced ingredients, listening to speeches on climate change
and being entertained by a wonderful story teller.

As three o'clock approached we realised we would need to head back
over the hill pretty soon to get back to the Waitati Hall to join in
with the festivities. The long legged, one wheeled wonder was bundled
into a car with his ginormous wheel for a well deserved ride home and
the remaining hardy bicyclists pointed our noses northwards. Aided by
the now friendly tail wind, we whipped back over the hill in
record-breaking time for the party.

At the party Virginnia launched Blueskin Low Oil Commuters (BLOC)
which aims to bring together people interested in making their daily
commute to Dunedin less reliant on fossil fuels. If this sounds like
you and you have not signed up, email Virginia (bloc@geology.co.nz)
.The first 10 people to subscribe to BLOC will receive a $20 Bicycle
Workshop Voucher, courtesy of Browns Avanti Plus. Only a few left, get
in quick and sign up to the BLOC.

So, a wonderful experience and a wonderful day, slightly hampered by
the weather but perhaps more affected by the Dunedin City Council who
advised us it was unsafe to bike on the Mt Cargill Road into Dunedin
even though ironically it is the official cycle route into the city.


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Ā ā Ē ē Ī ī Ō ō Ū ū
From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand.
All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public
domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished.
If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

Orokonui Ecosanctuary

By Sue Hensley

The exciting news this month is that of the planned release of around six
Haast tokoeka kiwi into the sanctuary. They are juveniles raised on an
island situated in Lake Te Anau and over the next few years will hopefully
form breeding pairs. Their young, once big enough to defend themselves from
stoat attack, will be returned to their natural territory in the Haast area.
It is a big responsibility and privilege to look after some of these highly
endangered kiwi. There are only 300 birds left in the wild and although we
may not get to see them, I for one am looking forward to listening for a
kiwi call on a still, warm evening.

Equally exciting news is that after a blitz on rats, they are now at
undetectable levels – let's hope it stays that way. It has been an enormous
task for field staff over the last two months, fortunately this year helped
by kind weather.

Some trees, particularly the pittosporums kohuhu and lemonwood have flowered
prolifically this year. The fragrance of the latter in the forest has been
very noticeable. The flowers may be small but their nectar must taste really
good to kaka. I watched one spend 20 minutes in the canopy using its
sensitive brush tongue to gather nectar from the tiny yellow flowers while
ignoring the nearby sugar water.

The Visitor Centre and Café are open every day from 9.30am to 4.30pm.
A range of guided and self-guided walks is available. Our Facebook
page and www.orokonui.org.nz will
keep you up to date with events.


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Ā ā Ē ē Ī ī Ō ō Ū ū
From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand.
All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public
domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished.
If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

Waitati Energy Project

By Scott Willis

Big Wind

Our local community turbine project is a nationally significant
project. How so? Well, we all understand, I hope, the benefits of
securing greater control over our energy needs and use locally.
Nationally, if we're successful and there were more communities like
us, we'd eventually reach a critical mass transforming our
centralised, think-big, top-down grid system into a decentralised,
responsive network with much greater resilience. This would also limit
the need for any large scale generation projects, reduce pressure on
existing infrastructure (and thus make things work more effectively),
and give us greater control over how we use our energy.

I've received messages of support from around the country thanks to
the profile our project has been given by WEP partner, the Hikurangi
Foundation (http://www.hikurangi.org.nz/), and I'm beginning to build
up a network of national advocates, who are already helping with bits
of technical and commercial advice. The fantastic Hikurangi
facilitation is already helping to sharpen the work we're doing on the
financial case for our community turbine. Meanwhile, I'm working with
Ros Day (planner) and Janet Stephenson (Otago Energy Research Centre)
on research that will allow our community consultation, if the Energy
Efficiency and Conservation Authority agrees on its merit. I hope to
have news for you before Christmas on consultation.

Small Wind

You can't have missed PowerHouse Wind's 'Thinair' single blade
prototype being tested at Sabina and Hagen's place on Blueskin Road
near the Eco-sanctuary. The exciting thing is that by mid November PHW
expects to replace the prototype with a pre-production model
(essentially replacing a single construction model with a
factory-ready model) and have it up and running continuously, allowing
Sabina and Hagen to export, as well as import, electricity.

Trials using a Christchurch manufactured (and world leading!) inverter
have already been successful in allowing power to be fed back to the
grid. Bill Currie (PHW) explains the complex process: "The turbine has
to start, be held by the controller at idle speed while the inverter
wakes up, checks the grid is suitable to be connected to, (e.g. no
lines people out there working) and synchronises with the AC voltage.
The turbine controller then has to start feeding power to the inverter
and telling it how much power to take to load the turbine correctly."
There's some perfectioning still going on, and investment needed
before Thinair turbines are rolling out the factory door, so please do
contact PHW if you want to know more about investing in local
innovative green tech for a sustainable future
(http://www.powerhousewind.co.nz/).

Blueskin Power is more than just big wind. The community turbine is
the keystone at present, as success here will allow so much more to
happen. But there is a further generation opportunity that may be
complementary, parallel, or alternative, depending on how we manage
the challenges ahead. This is integrating smaller household generation
into our local grid, via (for example) more Thinair turbines and
household Photovoltaic 1-2 kW arrays. Both these generation options
can use the same Enasolar inverters and will ensure progressively
greater local grid resilience with returns to individual households.
And the whole system can then be made so much more 'intelligent' with
Smart 'real-time' meters and intelligent home devices, giving power
back to the people!

More regular updates are sent out via the WEP update email or you can
contact me directly either at 03 4822048 / 0274888314 or
waitatienergy@gmail.com