Friday, 30 October 2009

Gallery on Blueskin exhibition

Gallery on Blueskin invites you all to the Campaign Opening of

"No-Plastic November"

this Sunday, November 1

2pm

Handmade Bag Exhibition and Sale.

Thursday, 29 October 2009

Blueskin Bay radio news for Friday October 30

Puketapu Radio presents Blueskin Bay local news in association with blueskin.co.nz

Sunday is the first of November, which means it’s Seacliff market time again. The market is held on Coast Road at Seacliff from 11am to 2pm, rain or shine. It’s a great place to buy plants, preserves and produce. New stallholders are welcome.

Amateur broadcasting enthusiasts are getting together on Monday at a public meeting to launch ‘Blueskin FM’, a local radio station for Blueskin Bay. The station will allow locals to host their own shows, while remaining airtime will relay the Puketapu Radio broadcast from Palmerston. The public meeting will be held at Warrington School, at 7pm, when it is hoped local people will form a management committee to run the station.

Need some relaxation in your stressful life? Try Qi-Gong classes. These are held on Tuesday nights at 6.30pm at the Waitati Hall. Everyone is welcome.

If you prefer something sporty, then Tae Kwon Do might be the answer. Classes are held on Monday and Wednesday evenings between 6 and 7.30pm at the Warrington Hall.

The Blueskin Bay local volunteer news website can be found at www.blueskin.co.nz.

 

Wednesday, 28 October 2009

POLICE COMMUNITY REPORT (column)

POLICE COMMUNITY REPORT

by Constable Jon-Paul Tremain, New Zealand Police, Waikouaiti

This month I would like to mention the new crime fighting tool
"Crimestoppers". Crimestoppers is an independent, 24/7 crime
information line in which members of the public can provide anonymous
information to New Zealand Police.

Crimestoppers was established in the UK about 21 years ago and has
proven to be a successful tool in helping police uncover and solve
crime. During its 21 years it has received over 1 million actionable
calls which have resulted in over 90,000 arrests. Similar programmes
are now up and running in other countries around the world.

Calls to Crimestoppers New Zealand will for the first 12 months be
taken by experienced call operators based in the UK, useful
information received by the line which is not of direct interest to
police will be passed on to other organisations such as ACC or CYFS.

This is a unique tool for both the public and police as it is
independent from police in terms of management and funding, and
importantly the system is based on anonymity. Police will not be able
to execute search warrants or trace calls to obtain identity details,
callers than therefore call with information in confidence.

Crimestoppers' call free number is 0800 555 111.

In emergencies dial 111.

If you see anything suspicious or if you wish to speak to the local
Police regarding any other matter you can contact us on 03 465 9127.

If you require information regarding road conditions, telephone New
Zealand Transport Agency on 0800 44 44 49.

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--
From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand.
All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public
domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished.
If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

Saturday, 24 October 2009

FICTION: Rubbish is Rubbish

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Blueskin Media <blueskin.input@gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 22 Oct 2009 13:29:40 +1300
Subject: Rubbish is Rubbish
To: Craig Marshall <blueskin.production@mac.com>

By Mira Neuman

My name is Mira Neuman, I am 10 years old and I go to Warrington
School. In September I entered this story in a DOC competition, and I
won. The prize was to be a DOC Ranger for a day. I could choose to go
with a coastal ranger, a skink ranger, a fresh water fish ranger, a
recreational and historic ranger or a threatened plant ranger. I
choose to go with the coastal ranger, Jim Fyfe.

On Tuesday 13 October my Mum and I went with him to look for female
sea lions on the Otago Peninsula. They are very rare. We saw two
8-month-old babies, one mother and some males. I learnt how to use a
VHF tracker, but we didn't hear any beeps. We had a great time and
learnt heaps.

November is No Plastic Bags Month, so I thought you might like to read my story:

RUBBISH IS RUBBISH

Chapter 1

"Mum, can we buy this cake?" asked Georgia. The supermarket was packed.

"I don't know, " said Mum.

"Please" pleaded Georgia. Her little brother Henry managed to say "Peese Mum".

"Well alright" said her Mother, groaning "That's another 10 cents for
another plastic bag"

They paid their money and left the shop.

Chapter 2

Eva flicked her long dolphin tail and sped after Sara.

"Hey Eva, watch out!"

"Tag!"

Another one of her dolphin friends flicked her on the back. Eva spun
in the water and gave chase to her third little dolphin friend. Her
pod was heading to Warrington Beach, with no idea that they were
heading for the worst summer ever.

Chapter 3

Georgia, her Mum and her little brother got into the car. Georgia's
Dad was waiting for them. "What did you get for tea?" he asked.

"Cake" smiled Georgia.

"We will get to Warrington beach in about 20 minutes now," her Mum butted in.

Chapter 4

The pod was gaining ground and Eva's Mother told her that they would
get there in about three hours. But Eva was getting tired and asked
her Mother if they could stop for a bit to rest. Since her Mother was
the leader of the pod she stopped the pod for some rest.

Chapter 5

The family ate their cake slowly and finished it in Warrington. Her
Dad said "Why should we keep this plastic bag, let's chuck it out the
window." He opened the window and threw it out.

They sped away laughing.

The plastic bag lay there, then the strong wind picked it up and the
bag sped across the ground, into the air and down towards the sea.

Chapter 6

Finally the pod reached Warrington and rested again, but they did not
know that the next day would change their lives forever. Eva woke up
first and awoke her Mum. At the top of the surf there were what looked
like jellyfish.

Chapter 7

The bag flew into the ocean right above a pod of dolphins with a baby
in the middle. It did not sink.

Chapter 8

The dolphins looked up. Her mother shot out of the water and snapped
one up. So did another mother, and then an another. Then suddenly her
mother choked and coughed.

Chapter 9

The plastic bag got stuck in her throat. She screamed and then sank
down as if she had an arrow in her tummy, and was gone.

"Nooooooo" shouted Eva as the two other Mothers choked and slipped
down into the cool dark depths of the sea.

Chapter 10

The pod did not know what to do, but they did know something. They had
to get away from there. They fled, swimming as fast as they could. Eva
did not know what to do, the leader of the pod was dead. Thousands of
questions raced through her head.

"Why? her pod?" Who? will be the new leader?"

Chapter 11

The pod had a vote on who should be the new leader. Nine dolphins
chose Meg, an older dolphin, but 14 chose Eva. She was almost old
enough anyway, and would take over her Mother's position as the
leader. But Eva did not know what to do. If her Mother were there she
would have showed Eva what to do.

Chapter 12

"Hey Georgia, should we go to the beach? Dad asked.

Georgia nodded, "How long to go now?"

Mum turned and said "About 10 minutes at the least"

It seemed to take them about 20 minutes but they only took 12. When
they got to the beach they saw a huge truck with the words "Save the
Dolphins" on it.

Chapter 13

The pod was away from Warrington by now and in good condition, but all
were really sad about their dead friends. Now they were heading for
warmer waters. Eva was beginning to get really good at being the
leader. One of the babies without mothers got a new mother but two
died as well.

Chapter 14

Georgia saw a man in a bright orange top and went over to see what he
was looking at. It was a dead dolphin.

"Pity this one looks like a leader who had a calf" said the man. He
got out his knife. Georgia did not want to watch but afterwards she
went over to the man and saw a plastic bag that looked somehow
familiar.

"Another bag, and this one's got a bit of plastic in it too." He read
it, "Double Chocolate Mud Cake."

"But that's what we had" said Georgia.

Chapter 15

One Year Later

The pod grew, new babies came. Eva did not dare to go to Warrington
again, but she had to, and this time there was no rubbish to kill any
of her pod so she let them stay there for a bit longer than usual.

Chapter 16

Georgia's family was sorry for the loss of a dolphin and gave 'Save
the Dolphins' $200, not knowing that they had killed it. But they
never threw rubbish out of the window again.


--
--
From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand.
All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public
domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished.
If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

--
--
From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand.
All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public
domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished.
If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

Friday, 23 October 2009

FEATURE: Counting down to a new world free of plastic

Counting down to a new world free of plastic

by Nancy Higgins

I admit it: I forgot my 'no plastic' bags the otherday while food
shopping. Our Waikouaiti Coast-wide 'no plastic, November' doesn't
begin until a couple of weeks, so I thought to myself: "Oh well,
Nancy, just buy some plastic bags. After all, the money is going to
towards the environment, and then you will have some to recycle at the
'no plastic November campaign opening."

"Sorry," said the checkout girl, "You can't buy them anymore. We have
to give them to you for free." I was dismayed. Here I was with my
wallet open, and they were refusing my money, and insisting that I
must take the bags for free. But I like the idea of paying for them. I
feel I should pay in some way to make up for the damage that the bags
may do in the future (there is a quiz in this 'Blueskin News' to find
out what damage can be done).

The checkout girl agreed and said that all of her customers were happy
to pay for them. The 'bagging girl' joined in. She couldn't understand
either why they were now free. They both said they didn't know who had
made the decision at New World to stop charging. If they were asked,
they would have said that Dunedinites understand. They are way ahead
of the game, and intelligent. After all, this is a University town.

Well, we here in Blueskin Bay must be geniuses then, because our 'No
plastic November' is going ahead. We won't renege. We are going to
encourage everyone to have a whole month of 'no plastic' bags. The
schools have just about completed their decorations on the eco-bags
that they will be selling as a fundraiser. The Gallery on Blueskin is
accepting 'no plastic' bag art for the campaign opening on November 1.
And, the recyclers are gearing up to take all of the plastic bags that
we can give them on plastic bag amnesty day, which is, of course, on
November 1. Blueskin Bay and the Waikaoaiti Coast are stepping up,
while New World steps back.

Counting down to a new world free of plastic

Sam Burnside-Woods and Tessa Burnside Woods model their newly-created
bags at the Waitati 'No Plastic' bag making workshop in October.
Photos by Nancy Higgins.

CLASSIFIED ADS updated

COUNSELLING, LIFE COACHING, REBIRTHING David Baillie, ND, BSc,
Waitati Valley Rd. Appointments: 021 122 0910
[12]

COB-EARTH WORKSHOP building a Cob-Oven and Rocket Stove, Dec 5-6
(12-13 if wet), Harmony Farm. www.gemstonetherapy.info/courses.htm
[02]

COURSES and internships in permaculture, sustainable building/energy
systems/communities, spiritual ecology, forest monitoring and trail
making at Harmony Farm, Waitati Valley Rd. www.gemstonetherapy.info
[02]

(Classified ads in 'Blueskin News' and on our website are free but
donations are always welcome, by cheque to Blueskin Media PO Box 154
Warrington or dropped off at Blueskin Bay Library. Blueskin Media is a
volunteer-run, not-for-profit community
publisher.)

WAITATI ENERGY PROJECT (column)

WAITATI ENERGY PROJECT

by Scott Willis

Our Enviroschools and GEOG 380

One of the most positive experiences I've had this year was listening
to the intelligent and considered questions Waitati School and
Warrington School
pupils put to the University of Otago Geography department's GEOG380
class at a recent visit to the automatic weather station at Double
Hill on Friday 16 October.

Geology students Seth, Lydia, Bridget and Renee visited
Waitati to talk to both school groups about wind testing and how
it fitted in with the Waitati Energy Project. Our children are
looking, listening and learning a lot and are deeply engaged in their
community, that's obvious. GEOG380's preparation (done during their
study break, prior to exams) made for a very productive afternoon.
They took the children through a variety of activities (who knows what
a Kestrel is?) and had children and adults alike enthused with
activities and full of information on our local wind potential. Thank
you GEOG 380!

Emissions Trading Scheme (ETS)

The Finance and Expenditure Select Committee heard submissions on the
amended ETS recently, and I made a submission of behalf of the
Blueskin Resilient Communities Trust and the WEP on 21 October.
(Contact me for written copies of the formal submission and verbal
submission). Of particular relevance to the WEP was National's desire
to remove the 'Household Fund' clause (insulation fund – see details
below). It was an odd experience, talking by phone to a group of
people I couldn't see, including a public gallery, on a dodgy phone
line. But it was a very low-carbon submission and well worth it too,
if feedback I received is any indication.

'In Transition' film premiere

The Dunedin premiere of 'In Transition' in Waitati Hall on 3
October was a fantastic event, with around 90 people attending, from
Hampden in the North to Brighton in the South. After the film,
representatives of each Transition movement present gave a brief
presentation, and then
discussion continued over a drink and snack. Intended as a celebration
of all that has been achieved so far, we've ended up with much much
more. Renewing or instigating collaboration on important issues,
getting opinions and catching up on news and events, strengthening the
existing networks – all of these things were beneficial outcomes, and
of course now we have this film available for loan (contact the BRCT
office). After the film people were invited to jot down ideas under
the subjects of 'Food', 'Transport', 'Energy', 'Economy',
'Environment', and 'Other' on large sheets of paper on the wall. Most
comments were received under the heading 'Other' but two comments on
current local issues were received under the title of 'Energy' and are
worth repeating: "I think it's a waste of energy to knock the old
Library down. Instead, also I think the old library is in a fantastic
transitional place toward another function within the Waitati
community. Save the old library!" wrote one person, while another
wrote "No Stadium in Waitati (A&P grounds or otherwise)". There were
many other comments (transcript of comments circulated via the WEP
email and online), but one more I want to highlight is this happy
idea: "Street parties to bring neighbourhoods together. Then it can be
developed into tool sharing, babysitting, seed swapping, and the list
goes on...". Yes, especially as we're moving towards summer.

350 Dunedin

By the time you read this, the big 350 Spring Festival on Anzac Avenue
Dunedin will have been and gone (it's the 24th of October), but right
now I'm looking forward to our involvement in this huge international
day of Climate Action. A really impressive amount of work has gone
into this by the local 350 team, and of course the 24th is just a date
– there is still all the work to do to encourage our negotiators to
try to achieve something substantial at Copenhagen: the space for
action on stopping runaway climate change is just getting smaller.

Retrofit Quality Assurance

On 22 October, Energy Smart had only 45 QA audits to complete
for WEP, with very few (and only minor) problems found which are being
rectified as they proceed. Many thanks to the Energy Smart team who
have gone over and above the letter of their contract to ensure a
quality job, in what was an incredible achievement within a very short
time frame. We're expecting all QA work to be done by the end of
October.

Retrofitting Insulation

You may be interested to learn that in the amended Emissions Trading
Scheme bill, National has proposed removing the Household Fund clause
(negotiated by the Greens with National to get insulation into NZ
households). This doesn't mean the current subsidies for insulation
will disappear overnight, but it does mean that they might disappear
in 2011 – affecting of course an invigorated industry gearing up to
insulate all of New Zealand, but more importantly dampening the
momentum to make all NZ homes healthy and warm, and New Zealanders
better off. If you want to find out more about these or other things,
you can contact the WEP at: waitatienergy@gmail.com, or by calling the
BRCT office on 4822048. You'll also find plenty of information on the
website (http://transitiontowns.org.nz/waitati) or by going on the WEP
email list.

Photo captions:

(SchoolAWSvisit 003.jpg): Seth of GEOG380 explains the
workings of the automatic weather station to Waitati School and Warrington
School pupils, principals and parents. Photo by WEP.

(SchoolAWSvisitKestrals.jpg): GEOG 380's Renee demonstrates
how Kestrel hand-held wind monitors work and what they measure.
Photo by WEP.

--
--
From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand.
All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public
domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished.
If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

LETTER TO THE EDITORS

LETTER TO THE EDITORS

Meeting the needs of Blueskin Bay youth

by Scott Willis

There's a strong history of groups in Waitati and Blueskin Bay working
together to make wonderful things happen. Many groups, trusts and
organisations in our wee area work cooperatively and openly on
volunteer power, building strong consensus. That is not to say there
is never dissent – there often is – but when consensus is
established it is all the stronger for having considered those
different viewpoints and working constructively to alleviate concerns.

And now there's a project for youth in Blueskin Bay. My hope is that
the Blueskin Youth Centre Administration Committee is able to work
with the Blueskin Bay community and local community groups to develop
strong consensus and support. As a proponent of community consultation
and strategic planning, along with an offer of support on these things
and funding, I've been 'shot at' by some members of the current
committee. Yet many of the same, I know, have the best of intentions
and to make a project for youth work there a certain simple steps that
cannot be avoided if funding support is desired.

First is developing Vision and Mission statements, with clear
objectives/goals. Making these publicly available is essential to
ensure there is no doubling up or unfortunate mistakes. Second is
broad consultation, with other community groups and the whole
community – allowing broad input into the selection of the best
project at the best moment. Third is project management – getting it
done. While there may have been mistakes in the process, it would be
unfortunate to waste the volunteer energy the committee has put into
it, but a pity too to work on something unlikely to succeed.

Rapid action can follow consultation that establishes a clear
objective fitting within a vision – all of which will often win the
support of funding partners and will have the support of the
community. I am confident that with a renewed effort and the right
will (and public meetings) we can yet move forward to provide positive
outcomes for the youth of Blueskin Bay.

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--
From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand.
All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public
domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished.
If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

OROKONUI ECOSANCTUARY column

The opening of the Visitor and Education Centre, shop and café at
the end of October is a significant milestone for the Ecosanctuary
which will add to
the long term economic sustainability of the fence and the conservation work
inside.

Having watched this year-long construction I have been full of admiration
for those who worked on the site even during spells of absolutely atrocious
weather. I was also touched by their interest in the Ecosanctuary. Much
kudos must also go to Chris Baillie (GM) whose talent for multi tasking, eye
for detail and capacity for prolonged and sheer hard work has managed to
smooth the many bumps on the way and kept the project on track to
completion. It is an impressive building and a beautiful space both inside
and out.

Gracing the entrance are two stone kaka carved by our artist in residence Moira
Crossman. Moira is offering an Oamaru Stone Carving Symposium at Te Whare
Arohanui from 27-30 Nov (see ad in this 'Blueskin News' for further details).

The bare ground areas now have green shoots thanks to large groups of
volunteers, including Purakanui School, who have planted out the entrance
roadway and around the Visitor Centre. Also completed is the path and
plantings for the Pa Harakeke. Please come and enjoy the walkways and seats
in both these areas.

Inside the fence nature is taking her course with very new hatchings of two
Kaka and 3 Tieke/Saddleback chicks. The Fuchsia is flowering well and
providing a sugar buzz for an increasing number of Bellbirds whose mass song
is now complemented by the occasional Tieke call.

The October pest monitoring round showed that we still have a few rats, but
at lower levels than last time. They are still entering traps despite
food becoming more abundant at this time of year.

Information about the Ecosanctuary is available at the Blueskin Bay Library, at
www.orokonui.org.nz and now you have another option – come up to the Visitor
Centre (open daily 9.30 – 4.30pm) and check out the displays or book a
guided tour!

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--
From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand.
All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public
domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished.
If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

EVENT NOTICE: Oamaru Stone carving symposium

OAMARU STONE CARVING SYMPOSIUM

Tutor: Moira Crossman

Dates: 27, 28, 29, 30 Nov

Venue: Te Whare Arohanui, Foyle St, Waitati

Cost: $10/4days

$5/single day

Includes tutoring, tools, stone and lunch

Numbers limited due to space and tools

For further information and bookings please phone
Moira on 473 9396 or txt 021 215 1808

Thursday, 22 October 2009

Blueskin Bay radio news for Friday October 23

Puketapu Radio presents Blueskin Bay local news in association with blueskin.co.nz

Tomorrow – Saturday – the Waitati Edible Gardeners and the Waitati Energy Project will have displays at the Spring Food Festival at the railway station in Dunedin. This is part of 350, the Global Day of Climate Action being held around the world to raise awareness of global warming and its effects. There’ll be music, face painting, and plenty of information about living sustainably. The festival is on from 1am to 4pm.

Also on Saturday is the Karitane Community Book sale. It runs from 10am to 2pm at the Karitane Hall. There’ll be bargains galore with fiction, non-fiction, fantasy and science fiction, and lots of kids books, plus cooking, gardening, travel and business books. All proceeds go to the Waikouaiti-Karitane River and Estuary Care revegetation project.

Sunday will be your chance to have a look at the new Orokonui Ecosanctuary visitor centre. There will be an official opening between 10.30am and 2.30pm with opportunities to see the new building and walk the main the track. The café will also be open.

Tuesday’s movie offering at the Waitati Film Society is the excellent Korean movie Spring, Summer, Autumn. With stunning photography and a measured pace, this movie delves into the daily reality of Buddhism. Movies are shown at Bill’s Place, Orokonui Rd from 8pm.

The Blueskin Bay local volunteer news website can be found at www.blueskin.co.nz.

 

WARRINGTON SCHOOL (column)

by Peter Dowden and school staff and parents

Our theme for Term 4 is Explorers and Antarctica in readiness for our
own Antarctic
explorer Trisha who will be soon heading south.

Mira Neuman had a wonderful day with DOC marine mammal ranger Jim Fyfe
who took her on his rounds of the beaches as part of her story writing
competition prize. Mira's story appears elsewhere in this month's
'Blueskin News'.

Our pupils have been making non­toxic cleaning products for our contribution to
the 350.org Day of Action on October 24. We were aiming to give away
350 cleaning product recipe/brochures and sell lots of our cleaning
products.

We now have an assortment of cushions for use in the new entranceway -
a big thank you to Sharon Brogan and her amazing (industrial) sewing
skills!

The Board of Trustees recently agreed to support a proposed new radio
station using skills and technical know-how from Puketapu Radio to
set-up an Open Source outpost at Warrington School available for the
Blueskin community to use for local programmes. The School will pay
for running costs of power and broadband, but the Board's support has
provisos:

the aerial poses no threat to health or environment

there is significant interest from the wider Blueskin community to
install and run it

the School's Broadband connection can cope with the additional demand

to be reviewed yearly

To find out what is happening at Warrington School:
http://wikieducator.org/Warrington_School

--
--
From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand.
All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public
domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished.
If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

Re: NEWS: Blueskin FM radio station planned

Please note that the Blueskin FM radio meeting previously announced
for another venue will now be held at Warrington School, at the same
time of 7pm, Monday 2 November.

UPDATED: Blueskin FM radio station planned

Amateur broadcasting enthusiasts are getting together on Monday, 2
November at a public meeting to launch 'Blueskin FM', a local radio
station for Blueskin Bay.

The station will allow locals to host their own shows, while remaining
airtime will relay the Puketapu Radio broadcast from Palmerston, which
currently has a poor signal around the Bay.

Warrington School has conditionally agreed to accommodate a transmitter and
studio, while technical support is also forthcoming. Blueskin Media,
who publish 'Blueskin News' each month and run a local news website,
will support the plan and provide news content, as they have already
been doing for Puketapu Radio.

The public meeting will be held on Monday 2 November at Warrington
School, at 7pm, when it is hoped local people will form a management
committee to run the station.

by the editors

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--
From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand.
All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public
domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished.
If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

Notice: A&P AGM

Blueskin A&P Annual General Meeting at 7.30pm, Tuesday 24 November
2009 at Waitati
Fire Station.

Photography sessions - 22 November

In aid of Blueskin Playcentre. A 20 minute sitting and large photo of
your choice for $10. Large range of products available. Fantastic
rates for photographs and all photos on disc for $125! 100% profits go
to Blueskin Playcentre, photos available by 4 December. Contact Marion
or David on 482 1395

--
--
From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand.
All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public
domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished.
If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

Notice - Working Bee

Join the Working Bee at Seacliff's Truby King Reserve on Sunday 8
November from 10am. Meet at the tennis court at Russell Rd entrance.
Includes plant release, weeding and inspection of old stone cross. BYO
gardening implements, gloves, refreshments, etc. Next Reserve Committee
meeting on 23 November, 7pm at Reserve. Enquiries to Robyn, phone
4657367.


--
--
From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand.
All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public
domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished.
If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

Blueskin Garden Club - November

By Lynnaire Johnston


The recent Blueskin Garden Club Spring Flower Show was a roaring
success with nearly 700 entries from all over Blueskin Bay, including
many from Warrington.

Our supreme winner was Tracey Kyle who submitted both the best
flowering shrub and the champion bloom.

We had joint winners in floral art – both with equal points: Rowena
Park and Daphne Henderson each produced stunning work.

The best exhibit was Ruth Spear's beautiful patchwork quilt and the
family which won the most points was the Mayhems of Waitati.

The individual winning the most points was Daphne Henderson who kindly
handed over her trophy to the children from the Warrington School in
acknowledgment of the wonderful exhibits they had entered.

The children's trophy was shared amongst five children who each scored
six points. They were Rose Mayhem, Rosa Cameron, Mary Locker, Michael
Rainbow and Stuart Van Turnhout.

Blueskin Garden Club president Lyn Carlyle was delighted by the number
of entries (given the bad weather before the show), the quality of the
entries and the number of people who attended the show on the day.

"We couldn't put on a show like this without the support of the local
community," she says. "Many people help out and we can't thank them
enough for giving up their time. This includes the teachers and pupils
of Warrington School and Playcentre who put in a lot of effort this
year."

November's Garden Club meeting will be a visit to a number of Bay
gardens on Thursday 12 November. Participants will need to be in the
St Barnabas Church car park (Coast Rd, Warrington) by 6.50pm.

--
--
From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand.
All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public
domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished.
If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

Desperate Need for Long Term Community Planning in Blueskin Bay

By Geraldine Tait

Three projects are being developed in parallel in the Blueskin Bay
area to build community facilities. These are: a new library in
Waitati (an extension to the Supper room), Toy Library space at the
Warrington Hall and a youth facility on Bland Park, Waitati. These
projects will incorporate an indoor sports area, youth group meeting
space, a new Play Centre and Toy Library rooms.

It doesn't take much common sense to realise this is a large number of
projects for one small community; with the associated fund-raising,
project development and time commitment needed to make them a success.
I am sure each one of them individually has a huge amount of merit.
However, I have alarm bells ringing loudly in my head right now. I am
very concerned that none of the groups proposing these projects has
adequately consulted the local community. Yes - some consultation has
occurred but to get community backing and good will there is a need
for much more comprehensive consultation.

I would like to challenge the whole community to take a step back and
undertake some serious research to obtain a really good profile of who
lives here and what their needs are. The 2006 census can provide some
useful information about the family structures, income and employment
in our community. This would be a good starting point.

What is the future age demographic likely to be? What are the key
services and organisations in Blueskin Bay, how well are they catered
for and what other services or facilities do we need to benefit the
future health and economic well-being of local people? We need to
consider the security of services such as our local shop and postal
depot, which is going to be moved when the road is realigned. How well
do we know the transport needs of local people? What particular
transport problems are there now or will there be in the future? What
effect has the growth of a large number of lifestyle blocks in our
area had and how well have these families integrated into our
community? What will be the effect of the new Eco-sanctuary? What
extra services will we need (e.g. public Toilets) and what business
opportunities will arise? Are the provision of halls, playgrounds, and
footpaths adequate? Do services for children such as schools and
preschools, meet the needs of local families? A challenge for these
services is to maintain healthy roles - are parents choosing to take
their children into town because there are no adequate childcare
facilities locally for working parents?

Research to produce a comprehensive community profile should be done
before we commit to any of the proposed new projects. This will be
helpful when sourcing funding. We need to show we have a good
understanding of our community structure and the services needed. Once
we know a lot more about our community, its services and needs then
consultation could begin for specific projects.

What is effective consultation?

Consultation is not just asking for feedback on an already completed
plan - it needs to start way before any decisions are made and it
should have several stages.

Primary consultation is an information gathering phase, which should
attempt to engage as broad a cross section of the community as
possible. This could be done through a letterbox drop to inform people
about the issue to be consulted on and inviting them to get involved.
It's important to identify the groups who are most affected by the
issue. For example if it's an issue such as youth facilities, the key
groups might be: local schools and preschools, parents, teachers,
sports and welfare groups and of course young people themselves. A
survey asking appropriate questions to find out how many people have
an involvement in the issue presently and in the future, what their
needs are and ideas about how to address the issue. The information
gathered needs to be summarised before moving on to the next phase.

Secondary consultation starts with the development of proposals, which
are firmly based on the primary feedback. If there are a wide variety
of views, then a range of possible solutions should be offered. The
whole community needs to be kept informed through the newsletter or a
letterbox drop. Key groups should be contacted and a public meeting
could be held to explain the options and help gauge local feeling.
Focus groups might also be used to get more in-depth opinions.

The Final Stage involves assessing all the feed-back from the
secondary consultation and deciding what the majority want,
particularly the target group. The community will be informed of the
preferred option. At this time a committee can be formed to take this
option forward, a wide cross-section of relevant groups need to be
represented on the committee, so that no particular faction controls
the project. Broad and active consultation should bring the community
in behind a project, raise enthusiasm and lead to a successful
venture.


--
--
From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand.
All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public
domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished.
If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

Sustainable Living Courses

Sustainable Living Courses

Cob Earth Buildings

Keep you warm with stored heat

Have wonderful curves and shapes

Wonderfully cheap. Mechanically strong

Walls breathe and create wonderful dry

winter living environments.

Mix gravel or sand, clay, straw

with water, and lay up in handfuls

to make an earth wall for any building

Lay over a sand mould and make an Oven

Around a flue and make a Rocket Stove

Learn all this having fun:

9am – 5:30pm Dec 5th and 6th

$165. Early bookings by 25th

$189 after Nov 25th

www.gemstonetherapy.info/courses.htm

Internships

Ecology and Relationships

Herbal Medicine

Native Forest Guardianship

Permaculture Forest Gardening

Sustainable Building, Communities and Solar Energy Systems

Trail Making & Maintenance

Your research and study benefits the world. You learn hands-on skills
with instructive supervision

www.gemstonetherapy.info/internships.htm

Volunteers

www.gemstonetherapy.info/volunteering.htm

Harmony Farm Waitati Valley Rd

Read our stories of life on the farm www.gemstonetherapy.info

www.harmonyfarm.wordpress.com www.harmonyforest.wordpress.com

MP Clinic times for November

PETE HODGSON
MP Dunedin North

Next MP clinics for your
community are:

Monday 16th November 2009

1:30pm Waikouaiti Library

2:30pm Waitati Library

Ph: 03 4741973
Fax: 03 4749913
Email: pete@petehodgson.co.nz

MP Office
32 Albany Street, Dunedin

Tuesday, 20 October 2009

Tae Kwon Do

by Meaghan Kelly

Eleven members of Warrington Tae Kwon Do attended a grading at Port
Chalmers on Saturday the 17 of October.

Congratulations to Joshua Hay, Joe Corbett, Zade Fairweather and
Christine Rainbow (yellow belt). Imogen Corbett, Tadhg Kelly, Lucan
Willis and Shay Abbott (green tab). Natasha Abbott (green belt), and
Scott and Bruno Willis (red belt).

Well done to everyone. You all put in a lot of time, effort and practice.

--
--
From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand.
All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public
domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished.
If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

Waitati Open Orchards

By Jackie Fanning

An afternoon wandering around Waitati learning how to bring new life
into old fruit trees.

This was one of many exciting moves planned for February 2010 to come
from last month's first Waitati Open Orchard meeting. We will soon be
displaying a map in the Blueskin Bay Library showing the locations of
existing trees that are available for public picking – which you are
welcome to add to!

Another plan is to get our hands on an apple press for use at the
WEGgies Harvest Market, which you can use to make your own apple
juice!

If you would like a specific type of fruit or nut tree planted in the
village, let us know at waitatiopenorchard@gmail.com or come along
to the next meeting on the 10 December (Waitati Hall 8pm). All
welcome – cake promised.

The contact for a parallel initiative in Purakanui is:
marionwassenaar@clear.net.nz. If there is anyone from Warrington or
Seacliff interested in being the contact and facilitator for Open
Orchards in these communities please contact us.


--
--
From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand.
All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public
domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished.
If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

Karitane Community Booksale

Books Galore and bargains for everyone at the Karitane Community Book sale.

When: Labour Weekend Saturday (24 October) from 10am to 2pm
Where: Karitane Hall, Coast Road, Karitane (no early sales)

Fiction, Non Fiction, Fantasy and Science Fiction, Kids Books (lots
and lots), cooking, gardening, travel, business and more. Free
tea/coffee and nibbles. All proceeds go to Waikouaiti-Karitane River
and Estuary Care revegetation project. We've got loads of books – now
we need lots of buyers.

You could even enjoy a coffee and muffin at the café in Karitane
afterwards, while browsing your purchases!

--
--
From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand.
All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public
domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished.
If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

Blueskin Bay Dance Competition

To all children of Blueskin Bay…show off your talent!

Now is your chance to shine or just have a go! On Sunday 13 December
from 10am to 12pm, there will be a dance competition held at Waitati
Hall. Organised by Rozalina Alexandrova of Rozi Dance Studio, who
currently teaches Salsa to adults in the community, the competition is
open to all children aged between 5 and 13 years of age.

The theme is 'The Best Dancing Dwarf'. Children can enter as a solo
act, as a couple or as a group. Dances are freestyle so you can choose
your own 1 minute dance. There will be prizes for each category and
for the best costume. All entries receive a free gift!

Participants, please book your place in the Blueskin Library before
Friday 4 December. We are seeking sponsorship for the event. Please
contact Rozi at rozalina10@gmail.com if you can help or if you would
like further information.

--
--
From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand.
All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public
domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished.
If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

Sunday, 18 October 2009

brief: Blueskin Youth Hall Association update

by Louise Booth

If you are interested in knowing what the Blueskin Youth Hall
Association have planned to go on Bland Park click on the following link:

http://www.transitiontowns.org.nz/node/2112

A plan of the proposed structure on Bland Park can be viewed at the library.

Friday, 16 October 2009

3 Karitane artists

Gallery on Blueskin is proud to host
Ta Vale Vakailo Kalitane
Le' Salon Karitane

________________________________

A group show by 3 Karitane artists
Helen Carter
Bernard Mullane
Joanna Tokona
________________________________

Opening
this Saturday
17 October
at 2.30pm
with afternoon tea provided

Blueskin Bay radio news for Friday October 16

Puketapu Radio presents Blueskin Bay local news in association with blueskin.co.nz

Local MP Pete Hodgson holds his monthly community clinic at the Blueskin library at 2.30pm on Monday. All members of the public are invited to meet with their MP.

The Library book car visits Warrington on Wednesday. For those who find it difficult to get to the library proper, this is an excellent way to catch up on your reading, or to drop back books you’ve finished with. The book car also has a great selection of movie DVDs and audio books.

Warrington book club also meets on Wednesday, after school. Afternoon tea is included. To find out more contact Blueskin Library.

Next weekend, Labour Weekend, there are two events on worth noting. The first is the opening of the Orokonui Ecosanctuary visitor centre on Sunday between 10.30am and 2.30pm. There will be an opportunity to see the new building and walk the main the track. The café will also be open.

And on the day before, that’s the 24th, the local WEGgies group will be manning a stand at the Spring Food Festival at the railway station in Dunedin. This is part of 350, the Global Day of Climate Action being held around the world to raise awareness of global warming and its effects.

The Blueskin Bay local volunteer news website can be found at www.blueskin.co.nz.

 

Bagmakers are over plastic 1

byNancy Higgins
Sasha from Waitati



 

 


Wednesday, 14 October 2009

Story from Otago Daily Times Online

A new youth facility in Waitati would give young people somewhere to "kick a
ball around" and a place to do physical activity in bad weather, say those
behind the idea.


------------------------------------------------------------
Youth facility proposed for Waitati [1]
------------------------------------------------------------
[2]

A new youth facility in Waitati would give young people somewhere to "kick a
ball around" and a place to do physical activity in bad weather, say those
behind the idea.


[1]
http://www.odt.co.nz/your-town/waitati/77968/youth-facility-proposed-waitati
[2]
http://www.odt.co.nz/your-town/waitati/77968/youth-facility-proposed-waitati

Story from Otago Daily Times Online

------------------------------------------------------------
Pupil wins chance to be ranger for a day [1]
------------------------------------------------------------
[2]

Ten-year-old Mira Neuman not only got a day off school, she got to track sea
lions and survey yellow-eyed penguin nests yesterday as she took up the chance
to be a Department of Conservation ranger for a day.


[1]
http://www.odt.co.nz/your-town/dunedin/77992/pupil-wins-chance-be-ranger-a-day
[2]
http://www.odt.co.nz/your-town/dunedin/77992/pupil-wins-chance-be-ranger-a-day

Photo republished with correct caption

This photo by 'Blueskin News' reporter Rozi MacRae from the public
opening day at the newly-refurbished Warrington School, held on Sunday
20 September 2009, appeared with an incorrect caption. The correct
version follows. We apologise for the error.

From left: a former principal's wife Lyne Carlyle, parent Elspeth
Moody, former principal Gilbert Carlyle, Warrington resident and
former school parent Lyn Hastie, school parent and chairperson of
Board of
Trustees Mark Familton, parents Christine Rainbow, Pete Russell and
Rae Russell (obscured), school grandparent Yoka Neuman (front),
principal Nathan Parker, parent and trustee Eric Neuman, parent Peter
Dowden, local residents Theresa Roche and Tony Roche.

Tuesday, 13 October 2009

WILD BLUESKIN: Sandflat surprises

Caption for ParadoneisSpNov.jpg
-----------------------------------
At 1 mm wide and several centimetres long, this polychaete worm was
the most abundant animal found in the Blueskin Bay study and appears
to be an undescribed species of Paradoneis. Photo by Brian Paavo.

Caption for SabellidC.jpg
------------------------------------
A 'feather-duster' worm like the one pictured above was common in the
inlet. It uses its broom-shaped head to breathe and sweep sediments
for food particles. Photo by Brian Paavo.

Caption for MacroclymenellaStewartensis-1.jpg
---------------------------------------
The bamboo worm Macroclymenella stewartensis is a common inhabitant of
Blueskin Bay. An average of 2,500 of them live in each square metre
of sandflat, recycling nutrients and stabilising sediments. Photo by
Brian Paavo.


WILD BLUESKIN

Sandflat surprises

by Brian Paavo

Consider Blueskin Bay as you look out your window, walk along the
shore, fossick for cockles, or simply breathe in the ambiance. It's a
magic place to live and work whether the sandflats are in the
forefront of your working day or the background of your life. At a
glance the sandflat may look static, but it is really a six square
kilometre expanse of dynamic animal communities. They're just a little
shorter and easily overlooked! These communities churn through the
seasons relentlessly, but they hold surprises that few suspect, even
species new to science!

The large Waitati River catchment channels rainwater, sediments,
vegetation, and pollutants from cloud forests, scrub patches,
pastures, a highway, and home gardens into the inlet. Everything that
people, plants, and animals leave behind heads for the sea, and in
this corner of the world, the denizens of Blueskin Bay serve as the
recyclers and gatekeepers to the ocean. Most people see the birds and
fish of the inlet. Many are familiar with the cockles that nestle in
the sand and breathe in each tide, but our team has recently had the
privilege to look a little closer at some of the real movers and
shakers among the inlet animals.

The Project

In mid-2009 Chorus (a separate division of Telecom New Zealand)
contacted us to investigate the likely ecological impacts of
operations required to lay a fibre-optic cable across the inlet to
provide reliable telephone and internet access to Warrington
residents. Brendan Flack of the East Otago Taipure Management
Committee (EOTMC) and Chris Hepburn from the University of Otago had
requested that Chorus, through Mitchell Partnerships, evaluate the
likely impacts to the broader animal ecology of the inlet, not just
the cockle beds which had been examined previously. The original cable
path proposal had already been extended to avoid negative impacts to
seagrass areas and cockle beds. Many of you probably heard of the
general operation in a flyer distributed by Chorus or media articles
in July (for example
http://blueskin-co-nz.blogspot.com/2009/07/cable-laying-proposal-in-blueskin-bay.html).
The full details of our findings should be freely available from
Chorus soon.

We started our study by walking along the proposed cable path with
Brendan (EOTMC) and Jim Fyfe from DOC. We took photographs of the
different habitats we observed in the 1.5 square km study area. We
then selected 14 sites and collected 42 core samples in August. Our
methods focused on collecting animals larger than 1 mm in any
dimension living in the top 150 mm of sand and mud.

The Multitudes

We found over 6,000 animals in our samples, belonging to more than 60
species. Our estimates indicate that there are probably closer to 80
species of animals this size living in the sands of the inlet. The
most numerous and species-rich kind of animals were polychaete
(bristle) worms. If you pull up a handful of sand during low tide
just about anywhere in the inlet, you'll probably see red, orange, or
green worms living in tubes, these are mostly polychaetes. Just like
worms in your garden, most polychaetes burrow through the sediment
bringing buried nutrients up to the surface, and oxygen down to other
animals. Without this process constantly turning over the inlet, the
sandflats would be a black stinking expanse of bacteria-rich goo with
far too much trash hanging around, few fish, and even fewer birds and
cockles. Most polychaetes specialise in their inlet jobs. Some are
predators, others skim food from the sediment surface, while others
mine deep. All play a role recycling nutrients and providing food for
larger animals in the inlet.

Although there were 60+ species in our samples, over 85% of the
animals belonged to one of only ten species. The single most numerous
find (2,171 individuals) was a species of polychaete that hasn't been
described before anywhere in the world. It is closely related to a
group of ten species known in New Zealand called Paradoneis (family
Paraonidae), but the Waitati species has a set of new features. The
closest descriptions come from an animal found only in deep water off
of northern Europe. Not a likely match!

The Waitati Inlet Paradoneis is about 1 mm wide and up to a few
centimetres long. Many of the animals collected in August had their
bodies full of salmon-pink eggs. These animals have red blood like
us, as can be seen in the photo below. They have a simple cone shaped
head which is three-quarters nose and about 14 pairs of gills along
their back. Without a microscope the bristles on their paddle shaped
'feet' look like simple hairs, but on closer inspection they turn out
to be special bristles (chaetae) which are shaped like those funny
pickle forks you see at dinner parties. The back end of the worm also
means business - the hairs become stout spikes for a dozen segments in
front of the worm's three 'tails'.

Although we don't know much about this particular species, other worms
in the same family are known to feed on bacteria growing on sand
grains and diatoms that form much of the brown 'scum' on top of
Blueskin Bay sediments. In our study area, there was an average of
6,656 of these worms per square metre forming a miniature army of
grazers and recyclers.

Paradoneis is not alone in this maintenance job. A smaller worm, only
a few millimetres long and half a millimetre wide, was another
polychaete found in half of our samples. It belongs to a family of
'feather-duster' polychaete worms called Sabellidae. Feather-dusters
have a delicate crown on their head which they use as gills and
filters. The inlet species may belong to the genus Chone, but more
research is required to be certain. It's important to find out if it
does belong to the genus Chone, because this genus has not been
recorded anywhere in New Zealand before. Unlike Europe and America,
there are lots of New Zealand species that have yet to be described
and we know very little about what role they play in the environment.
This delicate species has green blood and lives only on the very
surface of the sediments sweeping its broom-shaped head back and forth
in the mud. It picks out only those particles tasty enough and of the
right size to eat.

The final star on our inlet worm safari is the largest worm you are
likely to see in a handful of inlet sand. Two or three mm thick and 10
- 40 mm long, the bamboo worm (with the long name Macroclymenella
stewartensis) was originally described from Stewart Island, but is now
known to live in sheltered waters along much of the South Island.
They use their reinforced, bulldozer-like head to push deep into the
black mud swallowing sand and digesting the good bits. Their tubes
stabilise the sand in storms, form homes for smaller animals, and act
as pipes which bring oxygen tens of centimetres into the sediment as
their powerful throats pump water and mud to the surface.
Macroclymenella has a pretty, tulip-shaped bum that was often observed
to be regrowing after getting nipped off by fish, birds, crabs, or
other inlet predators.

What's Next?

Every one of the 60+ small animal species in the inlet plays its part
in the healthy functioning of the inlet ecosystem. This diverse and
abundant mini-wilderness is necessary to the survival of the larger
animals that we appreciate every day. Even more importantly, they
shape and stabilise the inlet in ways that we are only beginning to
appreciate.

Thanks to the survey work supported by Chorus, we now know more about
the life within the inlet than we did before, but what's next? There
are more discoveries to make than there are adventurous scientists or
funds to make them! Does the Waitati Paradoneis live elsewhere? We
haven't seen it in Otago Harbour nor Papanui Inlet, but the only way
to find out is to go and look in similar habitats nearby. Is Chone a
new record for New Zealand? Did they hitch a ride to New Zealand
recently or are these species native? Right now our team is looking
through some samples from the early 90s to see if these animals might
have been here then. Even the Waitati Paradoneis may remain unknown
beyond Otago. It takes anywhere from $4,000 to $8,000 to describe a
new species and few opportunities exist to fund such fundamental
science. It is a sadly common story that we have only begun to peek
into the inner workings of our own backyard before financial
limitations stop us from further exploration. We encourage everyone to
learn more about the organisms with which we share this planet and ask
you to urge your councils and representatives to support basic
research into the places and creatures that shape our lives.

(Brian Paavo PhD of Benthic Science Limited
(http://www.benthicscience.com/) is an advisor to Chorus, the Telecom
subsidiary proposing to lay a fibre-optic cable across Blueskin Bay)

--
--
From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand.
All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public
domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished.
If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

Monday, 12 October 2009

Rape Crisis Dunedin: Still needed, that's why we need you

STILL NEEDED

That's why we need you.

Are you interested in supporting women affected by sexual abuse?

Are you a good listener?

Do you want to be part of a women's organisation?

Do you want to learn new skills essential for support work?

YES?

Then we would love to meet you!

Rape Crisis Dunedin is running a training programme for new volunteer
support workers at the end of November - so if you would like to be
involved please pick up the phone and call us.

Rape Crisis Dunedin Inc.

Ph: 474-1592

E: rcrisis@xtra.co.nz

Classified Ad: CARPENTERY WORK

CARPENTERY WORK, post and beam, stopping, etc: Mark Horsefield 482 2515


(Classified ads in 'Blueskin News' and on our website are free but
donations are always welcome, by cheque to Blueskin Media PO Box 154
Warrington or dropped off at Blueskin Bay Library. Blueskin Media is a
volunteer-run, not-for-profit community publisher.)

LETTER TO 'BLUESKIN NEWS': Library Extension

Dear editors,

If the reason for abandoning the first design in favour of one which
involves demolishing the present library is merely because it is not
"green" enough (R. Murphy, architect; Blueskin News, Oct .'09) then,
in my opinion this is unjustified and reflects poorly on the
architect. What is wrong with lining the walls and double-glazing the
windows? It sounds to me like a case of "B___ it, we'll do a
Carisbrook!"

The "greenness" of the new design will be nicely cancelled out by the
"blackness" of tearing down a perfectly good library - hardly the mark
of a "Transition Town"!

Yours frugally,

John Salter

Friday, 9 October 2009

Blueskin Bay radio news for Friday October 9

Puketapu Radio presents Blueskin Bay local news in association with blueskin.co.nz

Use this last day of the school holidays to learn to make cloth bags. A workshop open to all is being held this afternoon at Waitati Hall from 2 to 5pm. This skill will come in very useful next month during No-plastic November.

If you fancy a bit of a knees-up, look no further than tonight’s Salsa Party at Waitati Hall at 8 pm. Everyone is invited, whether or not you’re a salsa dancer, just bring along something to eat and drink. However, it is adults only.

On Sunday there will be a working bee to clear Evansdale Glen swimming hole of fallen willow branches and to protect native tree seedlings. Bring along any useful tools, safety gear, ropes, wetsuit and your gumboots. Start time is 11am.

Tuesday night’s movie offering at the Waitati Film Society will be the American movie, Intimate Stranger.  It combines biography, personal inquiry, history, portraiture and cultural anthropology. Movies are shown at Bill’s place in Orokonui Rd from 8pm.

It’s nearly tennis season and the Waikouaiti Tennis Club invites Blueskin Bay players to take part in their doubles twilight competition on Tuesday and Wednesday evenings. The competition starts in the middle of this month so gather your tennis-playing friends and put together a team. For more details phone 465 7409.

The Blueskin Bay local volunteer news website can be found at www.blueskin.co.nz.

 

Monday, 5 October 2009

Blueskin News for October

From: Louise Booth

Happy reading.

http://newzealand.wikia.com/wiki/File:BNOct09Small.pdf

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From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand.
All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public
domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished.
If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

Friday, 2 October 2009

St Barnabas Service

St. Barnabas Church service will start an hour early this coming
Sunday 4 October to
celebrate the confirmation of Kieran, Jacquie, Nina and Jeremy. There
will be a shared
meal at the Warrington Hall afterwards.

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From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand.
All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public
domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished.
If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

Blueskin Bay radio news for Friday October 2

Puketapu Radio presents Blueskin Bay local news in association with blueskin.co.nz

Saturday night sees the Dunedin premier of “In Transition”, a movie about the Transition Town movement, of which Waitati is one. Transition/sustainability groups from all around Dunedin will give short presentations following the film which starts at 7.30pm in the Waitati Hall. There is a $2 entry koha or for a $6 entry koha, a complementary glass of wine or craft beer.

On Sunday – rain or shine – the Seacliff market returns at 11am. If you haven’t yet been to the market you’re missing a treat, every month it gets better, with more stall holders and a wider variety of goods on sale. You will now find produce, plants, preserves, books, wooden gifts, jewellery, ceramics and bric-a-brac there. The market is held on the main road at Seacliff.

Book-a-holics will enjoy BookChat with local musician and author, Paul Corfield on Tuesday. Paul will talk about his book ‘Hitchhiking in New Zealand: a journey through the Heartland’ and entertain with his unique style of music. You can enjoy a coffee while swapping book recommendations. This all happens from 10.30am in the Blueskin Nursery Cafe.

During the school holidays workshops are being run on how to make simple flax items including kete. The next one is on Wednesday, from 2-5pm in the Waitati Hall. The workshops are free but be sure to register at the library. They are suitable for all age groups.

Want to see fruit and nut trees, herbs etc planted in public places in Waitati that we can all harvest? Then come along to the first meeting of the Waitati Open Orchard Initiative on Thursday, October 8 at

8pm in the Waitati Hall Committee Room.

Blueskin Garden Club meets at the Surf Lifesaving Club at Warrington at 7.30pm next Thursday. Members and guests will hear from Nancy Todd on her work as a nurse with Maori and Pacific Island families. There will also be raffles and plant sales. Plus the usual bloom or vegetable competitions.

The Blueskin Bay local volunteer news website can be found at www.blueskin.co.nz.