Friday, 28 August 2009

Blueskin Bay radio news for Friday August 28

Puketapu Radio presents Blueskin Bay local news in association with blueskin.co.nz

Petty vandalism has been reported at the Blueskin Bay Library recently. Branches have been pushed through the book return slot, posters burned and network cabling damaged. If you notice any untoward behaviour near the library and the hall, the Port Chalmers police would like to hear about it.

Waitati’s edible garden group, the WEGgies, meet on Monday night. On the agenda will be plans for allotments, the community garden, garden tours and more. All WEggies are invited to 5 Foyle St, Waitati, at 7.30pm.

Tuesday night’s Waitati Film Society offering is the 1944 American classic, Gaslight. Ingrid Bergman is a wealthy English socialite whose husband attempts to destabilize her mind, aided and abetted by a

petulant, hard-bitten parlour maid. Movies are shown at Bill’s Place, Orokonui Rd at 8pm.

It’s time to start thinking about entries for the Blueskin Garden Club Spring Flower Show later this month. Competitions include flowers, baking and handicrafts, with categories for adults and children. All the details are in the September issue of Blueskin News which will be out early next week.

And, for the actively inclined, don’t forget salsa dance classes on Thursday nights: children at 5.30pm, and adults at 7pm to 8pm. On Tuesdays there are Qi-Gong classes at 6.30pm. Both are held at the Waitati Hall.

The Blueskin Bay local volunteer news website can be found at www.blueskin.co.nz.

 

 

Thursday, 27 August 2009

Gallery on Blueskin exhibition

Gallery on Blueskin exhibition

By Louise Burnside

Gallery on Blueskin invites you to the opening of the next solo show
Friday 4 September 2009 from 6pm:

* New work by Rachel Hirabayashi including painting & sculpture.

Waitati library vandalised

Waitati library vandalised

The after hours book bin at the Blueskin Bay Library in Waitati was
tampered with last weekend, either late on Saturday 22 August or on
Sunday 23 August.

Vandals forced large branches in through the book slot, and reached
through and damaged network cabling conecting a computer located
inside the library near the book slot.

A sensor-operated security light working outside the library was
tampered with and posters and some of the notices on display outside
the entrance were set alight.

Blueskin Bay librarian Louise Booth would like anyone who noticed
anything untoward to contact the Port Chalmers police.

(by Blueskin News editors)

(ends)

Contact:

Louise Booth
Blueskin Bay Librarian, Dunedin Public Libraries
Dunedin City Council
Harvey Street, Waitati; PO Box 6, Waitati 9069, New Zealand

Telephone: 03 482 2444, 03 474 3690; Fax 03 482 2445
Email: lbooth "at" dcc.govt.nz; www.dunedinlibraries.com

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From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand.
All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public
domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished.
If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

Wednesday, 26 August 2009

Bit of A Do funraiser

Bit of A Do funraiser

by Scott Willis

The wonderful, amazing Waitati PTA annual Bit of A Do funraiser will
be held on Saturday the 19th September, from 8pm, in Waitati Hall.
(theme: 'Uniformity' with special costume prizes).
Not only do we have TWO great bands ("SkyBus" and "Amanda Goodwin and
the Mighty Mightys" will keeping the dance floor overflowing) but we
also have a craft beer bar to maintain quality local lubrication.
We've done our best to ensure the cost is manageable, and in fact
great value: this is the community event of the year!
Tickets (supper included) are $15 ($17 on the night), and available at
Blueskin Bay library, Waitati School and selected sites around town.
Make sure you put a few dollars in your pocket to try a new beer or
buy a couple of raffle tickets. Any proceeds will support IT at
Waitati school, but most of all it'll be a fantastic night. "But who
will look after the children?" Sabina Lobitz is coordinating a
babysitter service for the evening, so if you are in need, call Sabina
on 4821218. See you all there!

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From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand.
All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public
domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished.
If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

Sunday, 23 August 2009

Orokonui Garden Bird Surveys

Where have all the silver-eyes and pigeons gone?


Twice each year, in July and October, a group of local people devote
an hour to recording the species and numbers of birds that visit their
garden. The main objective is to try to document the effects of the
Orokonui Sanctuary on bird populations in our garden. Not unexpectedly
we haven't as yet come up with any information that can be directly
related to the sanctuary, but along the way some general interest data
turns up - and this is certainly the case for the July 2009 survey.


In the table are the results for the twelve most frequently sighted
birds; the first number is the percentage of the people who saw the
species and the second is the average number that were seen.


CRAIG - PLEASE INSERT SURVEY IN ATTACHED FILE


It is always pleasing when the questions raised by keen observers are
picked up in by surveys. The absence of pigeons and silver-eyes and
the sudden increase in sightings of rosellas had been mentioned to me
and are certainly evident in our own garden and records. The question
is of course, why have these changes happened?


Over to you Derek, bird man extraordinary.


Where have all the kereru gone? The answer is simple. Most of them are
gorging on tree lucerne planted to attract such birds up on a property
along Mountain Road in the Silverpeaks. There were over 200 a couple
of weeks ago, probably the biggest flock seen around here for 50
years. Kereru fly long distances in search of food; they regularly
commute across Foveaux Strait to Stewart Island. They know when
seasonal food sources are on-line, arriving at groves of kowhai as
they begin to flower, willows as they come into bud and are especially
good at finding ephemeral sources of food like hillsides of poroporo
after pine forest clearance. So every now and then when something good
becomes available all but a few contented residents may temporarily
desert your farm or garden for greener pastures.


Silvereyes have a similar approach to food. Flocks form in the autumn
and they spend the winter moving around the country looking for
fruiting trees. Apples will do just as well as native rimu and
kahikatea, as well as any friendly human without a vicious cat who
will feed them bread, cake, fat or sugar water. You may think you are
seeing the same silvereyes every day but in fact less than one in ten
of those dozens at your feeder will stay for more than a few days and
some suburban garden bird feeders are little more than drive in, fast
food outlets on the side of the silvereye highway to spring.


The lack of silvereyes this year has been remarked upon by many who
feed birds in and around Dunedin. Maybe they had a poor breeding
season? They nest from September right through to March, producing 2-3
nestlings at each attempt. They can more than double their numbers by
winter - if they are not eaten by rat, cat, stoat, weasel, ferret,
'possum, harrier, kingfisher, or rained or snowed upon, blown away or
starved to death through lack of food in the cold, wet late summer. Or
maybe numbers were decimated by the bird pox that caused bleeding wart
like growths on their feet and head last winter?


However, there was no indication in the autumn bird counts in and
around Orokonui that anything unusual was taking place. Numbers were
much the same as the previous three years when dozens arrived on cue
to bird feeders in late May.


So maybe they never needed to come into gardens because there was
plenty of food available elsewhere and certainly last autumn did seem
to be a very good one for tree growth and fruiting. Back in July there
were "certainly lots of birds" in the forests around Leith Saddle
where the motorway from Waitati begins its descent toward Dunedin and
today small flocks constantly move through the bush in the Orokonui
sanctuary.


Our next spring's bird counts in Orokonui may be the best indicator of
what happened. If numbers are much the same as usual then it might
suggest there was plenty of food available through the winter in the
bush. If they are low then maybe last year's breeding season was a
poor one after all. If so then there is probably no reason to worry.
Silvereyes adapt to somewhat changeable habitats. They die young but
breed fast and produce lots of young. Numbers will soon go up again
and you will be back to feeding 3 litres of sugar-water every half
hour.


And as for the increase in Rosellas, I am betting on chance and would
like to see more study. Please take part in the October count.

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From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand.
All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public
domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished.
If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

BLUESKIN GARDEN CLUB - SPRING FLOWER SHOW 2009

Saturday 26th & Sunday 27th September 2009


To be held in the Waitati Hall.
Entries accepted at the Hall, Saturday 10:00am.-1.30pm.
Open to the Public Sunday 11am-3.00pm.
Prize Giving Sunday 2.45pm.
Entries must not be removed prior to 3pm - but must be by 4pm.
No charge.
Own containers accepted. Some small bottles available.
Entrant will be responsible for reclaiming their own containers.
No arranging of exhibits in Hall.
Plant Stall and Raffles.


PRESCHOOL, JUNIOR & INTERMEDIATE


Entries in the Children's section MUST be the work of the child named.
While Children may enter Adult sections, points gained there will not
be included for the Junior Trophy.


The trophy is for points gained in the CHILDREN'S SECTION ONLY.


Preschool - under 5 years
Infant - 5 and 6 years
Junior - 7 and 8 years
Intermediate - 9 to 14 years


1. Vegetable creation
2. Sand Saucer
3. Fairytale mask using a paper mache or cardboard equivalent – any medium
4. Recycled Creation – base to be no larger than A3 paper size


CHILDREN'S BAKING;


1. 3 Pikelets – on a plate/saucer
2. 1 Gingerbread man

Each child who enters and who is present at the prize giving will be
given a plant.

Above entries apply for each age group.


TROPHIES:

CHAMPION EXHIBIT
Champion Bloom
Family with most points in the show
Most points in floral design
Most points in junior section
Most points in flowering shrub section
Individual points trophy


ADULT


Class A - Daffodils


Daffodil – Trumpet.
1. One stem, petals white trumpet any colour
2. One stem, petals yellow trumpet any colour


Daffodil – Large Cup (cup more than one third length of petals)
3. One stem, petals & cup yellow
4. One stem, petals yellow, cup any colour
5. One stem, petals & cup white
6. One stem, petals white, cup any colour


Daffodil – Small cup.
7. One stem, petals yellow, cup any colour
8. One stem, petals white, cup any colour


Daffodil – Other varieties
9. One double daffodil – one colour
10. One double daffodil - bi-colour
11. One Multi Headed daffodil
12. One any other variety
13. One miniature, any colour
14. 3 stems daffodils, any varieties, to be staged in one vase


Class B - Bulbs


1. Hyacinth - 1
2. Muscari (matchheads) - 6
3. Tulip – single petalled - 1
4. Tulip – any other variety - 1
5. Anemone mixed - 3
6. Ranunculas – any colour - 3
7. Freesias mixed colour - 3
8. Any other Bulb/Corm flower - 1
9. Iris – Dutch, any colour - 1
10. Iris – Miniature - 1
11. Iris - Bearded, any colour - 1
12. Fritillaria – small variety - 1
13. Trillium - 1

Class C – Cut Flowers


1. Polyanthus – any colour – 1 truss
2. Polyanthus multicoloured – 1 truss
3. Polyanthus 3 colours - 1 truss each colour, one vase
4. Polyanthus 3 multicoloured – 1 truss each colour, one vase
5. Primroses – single one colour - 6 stems
6. Primroses – single mixed - 6 stems
7. Primroses – double one colour - 6 stems
8. Primroses - double Mixed - 6 stems
9. Primula denticulata
10. Pansies/violas-3on a saucer – any colour
11. Violets – mixed - not more than 6 stems
12. Violets - one colour - not more than 6 stems
13. Lavender – any variety, 3 heads
14. Any cut flower not mentioned - 1
15. Hellebore – any colour – one stem 1
16. Hellebore foetidus 1


Class D – Flowering Shrubs


1. Rhododendron - one head - large
2. Rhododendron – one head - small flowering
3. Rhododendron – one head - miniature
4. Camellia – Single - 1
5. Camellia – Double - 1
6. Camellia - Semi double - 1
7. Camellia - Miniature - 1 sprig
8. One branch of Any Other Spring Tree or Blossom
9. One branch Protacea e.g. Branskia, Protea etc.
10. One branch of Any Other Flowering Shrub
11. Any Flowering Climber

Class E – Floral Design:


1. Petite (over 100mm &less than 230mm)
2. Unusual Container
3. Funky Flowers
4. Art in a Vase
5. Bridal Beauty


Class F – For Men:


1. Camouflage – accessories allowed


Class H – Adult:


1. Handmade teddybear
2. Handknitted adult's garment
3. Handknitted child's garment
4. Patchwork item – machined
5. Patchwork item – hand pieced
6. Patchwork item – applique
7. Beaded article
8. Embroidered article
9. Cross stitched article
10. Putiputi – flax flowerss


Class I – Home Produce


1. Jar of jelly - 1
2. Jar of jam - 1
3. Jar of relish or chutney - 1
4. Jar of pickles - 1
5. Jar of savoury sauce - 1


Class J – Baking


1. Scones - 3
2. Muffins - 3
3. Shortbread - 3
4. Biscuits - 3
5. Fruit loaf - 1
6. Oven baked bread - 1
7. Breadmaker bread - 1

Class K


1. Eggs – on a saucer - 3


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From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand.
All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public
domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished.
If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

Saturday, 22 August 2009

Blueskin Media to feel the blowtorch of public accountability

Blueskin Media AGM

by Louise Booth, president

Blueskin Media, the volunteer group which publishes 'Blueskin News'
and the blueskin.co.nz news website, is holding its Annual General
Meeting at 8pm, Monday, 14 September at the Blueskin Bay Library.

Blueskin Media meetings are famed for their brevity and congeniality.
Like all Blueskin Media meetings, our AGM is open to the public: all
our readers, contributors and advertisers are welcome to attend and
assist in electing our office bearers.

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--
From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand.
All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public
domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished.
If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

FEATURE: Community potato patch

Community potato patch

by Rosemary Penwarden

When Lynley and Frank O'Neill offered their top paddock for a community garden,
digging half an acre of pasture by hand looked like hard work, so we decided
to experiment with the traditional Irish "lazy bed" method – potatoes it had
to be. The horses did the first bit; their job was to eat the grass down.

I felt like a kid on the back of Frank's tractor and trailer when we drove
down to his pine trees to gather wool bales full of needles.

Then we moved on to the paddock with sticks and string, and pegged out some
straight(ish) rows, covering about ¼ acre. While the idea was not to dig,
there was still a small square of sod to be lifted up, about ½ metre apart,
for the potato to sit. Into each "nest" we stuffed pine needles, then a
potato, then more pine needles in an attempt to discourage wireworm.

George Terry found us some old spoiled hay to go on top. Seaweed came next;
this involved a couple of trailer trips to the beach. We also put
wet newspaper – tons of it – between the rows to stop weeds.

Then we waited, and experienced one of the driest springs and summers we
could remember. We wondered – had we put the hay on too thick? Should we
have used more pine needles? Or less? Eventually a few shoots popped through
and we piled more hay on top. It was well into autumn before we dared feel
underneath for potatoes. Yes, they were there. Harvest day was planned,
around work, local equestrian events, school calendar, holidays, and the
weather. In each nest were up to 10 spuds of all shapes and sizes.

We harvested about 500 kilos. Most fitted the criteria of a successful
potato but some were already eaten by slugs, a few were infested with
wire-worm, and some sounded ominously hollow. These ones, rotten on the
inside, had potato blight, probably a result of sowing so late in the
season. We think the pine needles protected most of them from wire-worm – a
nasty little brown and yellow segmented beetle larva - so we will use more
needles this season for our next crop.

We want to do the same thing in a new patch of the paddock this year, except
that we will sow earlier. Last year's patch is now filled with excellent
compost and garlic is already planted. Onions and pumpkins will follow.

This year's experiment includes fair trade coffee grounds, but we still need
heaps of spoiled hay for the next potato crop. We are planting at the end of
September. If you're interested in joining in (and know of any hay or straw)
we'd love to hear from you. Email Derek derekonley@yahoo.com if you can help.

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From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand.
All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public
domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished.
If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

DCC Blueskin Bay Cleanup Day

Blueskin Bay Cleanup Day

Saturday 26th and Sunday 27th September

Warrington Domain

Cars: $6.00
Station wagons: $11.00
Cars with trailers, vans and utes: $16.00

Peter J Moroney.
Contracts Supervisor.
Solid Waste.
Water and Waste Services.
Dunedin City Council
P.O.Box 5045
Moray Place
Dunedin: 9058

Phone. 03 474-3474.
Cell: 027-486-5180.
email:pmoroney@dcc.govt.nz
www.dunedin.govt.nz

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From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand.
All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public
domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished.
If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

COMMENTAIT (column): Is democracy in Dunedin about to take a nosedive?

COMMENTAIT

by Geraldine Tait

Is democracy in Dunedin about to take a nosedive?

The Dunedin City Council is just going through the process of a
Representation Review, the initial outcome is the proposal to combine
four of the citiy's wards and create one mega ward.

The Waikouaiti Coast/Chalmers Ward would remain separate and retain
its one councillor. Mosgiel/Taieri would still have two councilors but
the rest of the city would be rolled into one ward with eleven
councilors.

Some people think this is a great idea: they are looking forward to
having a say in the selection of the majority of the councilors rather
than one to four of them under the present ward system. However the
change to the ward boundaries may have repercussions some people have
not anticipated.

From the point of view of the voter, imagine the voting papers in
October next year: if there are eleven council seats in one ward there
will probably be three to four times that many candidates. Will voters
want to troll through the information booklet and read profiles of
30–40 candidates? Will they want to receive election material from
30–40 candidates through their letterbox? Probably not, so how will
they choose who to vote for?

There are various well recognized techniques. Skim down the list and
try to find names that look sort of familiar, which is how many
sitting councilors get reelected. Skim down the list and don't vote
for the sitting councilors or other candidates who you know of and
dislike or distrust. Or, thirdly, skim down the list and randomly
choose people because you like the sound of their name or their
picture in some advertising material.

Choosing eleven city councilors is not the only issue: in the same
voting paper, electors are voting for the Otago Regional Council (six
candidates), The Mayor of Dunedin, The Otago District Health Board (8
candidates), and in some areas up to six Community Board members and a
Licensing Trust representative. This is enough to give most people a
headache and make them feel like they need to have a lie down.

Voter confusion means people won't vote or they will only fill in some
sections and avoid those with too many candidates. Of course this
already happens but with a lot of extra candidates to choose from in
the proposed Mega Ward, I think this problem will become much more
extreme. Voting papers should be simplified by reducing the number of
sections, to avoid elector burnout.

Although once elected, all Councilors take an equal part in making
decisions about the city and how it will be managed, being elected by
a certain geographic area has some positive effects. People may feel
more comfortable raising local issues with their Ward councilor. The
majority of Ward Councilors live in the Ward they represent, therefore
they may be more aware of local issues. Under the proposed system the
majority of Councilors could all live on one side of town, this could
lead to less long-term support or interest in other areas of the city.

From the perspective of council candidates, creating one mega ward
will make it much more difficult for less well resourced people to run
a competitive campaign. The allowable advertising budget for each
council candidate will no doubt increase to reflect the much larger
area that candidates have to cover. Funding the production and
delivery of election material to such a large area will be very
expensive. Other forms of campaigning such as door knocking and small
'meet the candidate' meetings will not be effective across one huge
city ward. This will result in a loss of democracy because the best
candidates may not win but the ones with the biggest wallets will!

Women, Maori and other minority groups are already grossly
under-represented on our councils, increasing the cost of running a
city-wide campaign is going to make it even more difficult for these
groups to get a fair bite of the cherry. An effective council will be
one that truly represents the diversity of our community, with a good
mix of age, gender, income, social and ethnic groups.

I am concerned that these proposed changes will move us further away
from achieving a democratic result and more likely to see media
personalities and older, white, middle-class, male business people
control the destiny of our city. In the last 2-3 years there has been
a high level of dissatisfaction with the City Council and its decision
making processes. Many people feel it is time for a change. I think it
is more likely the Mega Ward will cement in the current regime rather
than being a template for better representation.

(Geraldine is a member of Waikouaiti Coast Community Board and a
previous City Council candidate.)

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From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand.
All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public
domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished.
If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

OROKONUI ECOSANCTUARY column

OROKONUI ECOSANCTUARY

by Sue Hensley

"Be Involved" is the theme for this year's Conservation Week and what better
way to be involved than to come to the Pa Harakeke work day at the
Ecosanctuary. David Mules, from DOC and Kati Huirapa (the Karitane
runanga), is overseeing the development of this flax plantation and
has lined up various tasks for the day – something for everyone.
Details are on the Conservation Week website (have a look for other
events too) and put Sunday 13 September 10am in your diary.

Our meeting on Monday 14 Sep, 7pm at the Waitati Hall (committee room)
will include slides featuring our species reintroductions and Chris
Baillie
(General Manager) and Ralph Allen (Trust chairperson) will chat informally about
recent developments over a "cup of tea" and pikelets.

Those who have walked the tallest tree track and beyond recently will have
noticed some big changes. For over a year the Rotary Club of Dunedin have
been upgrading the Valley track and shifting gravel for the track by
wheelbarrow - an onerous task by any standards. It has now become
impractical and so they employed helicopters to fly in 4 tonnes of gravel
and material for the bridge crossings. The smaller helicopter did double
duty by ferrying photographers from NHNZ who took footage of the sanctuary
from the air, some of which will be used for the interpretive display panels
in the Visitor Centre.

The rangers meanwhile have almost completed the mammoth task of putting out
450 poison bait stations and modifying and resetting 450 'Trakka' tunnels.
Hopefully this will cut residual pest numbers back to undetectable levels
and ensure the breeding success of the more endangered species like
Tieke/Saddleback.

The Ecosanctuary is open exclusively for guided tours at present. Bookings
are essential. Tours cost $20 adult $10 child with half price for members.
Tours are for 1½ - 2 hours and are for a maximum of 8 people per guide. Come
and see this fantastic forest restoration project in progress, learn about
the changes that have already been made and support the development of the
Ecosanctuary.

For enquiries the office number is 482 1755. For further information on the
Ecosanctuary, visit www.orokonui.org.nz or see our box at the Blueskin Bay
Library.

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From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand.
All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public
domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished.
If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

(updated) THE BLUESKIN BAYLEAF: Invigorating Soup

THE BLUESKIN BAYLEAF

By Rowan Holt

Invigorating Soup

You are a tougher person than I if you couldn't do with a bit of a
pick me up at this time of year. Using the only surviving things in my
garden, I came up with this warming blaster…wonderful served with
cheesy scones or I think some poached tofu cubes added for a protein
fix could also work.

Don't forget how easy and satisfying it is to make bread too. If you
don't get a chance to make it yourself, the café in Karitane has a
mini bakery which offers organic wholemeal loaves and fresh
ciabatta…delicious.

5 baby leeks, chopped

1 T butter

1 T oil

Sweat together for 5 minutes on med-low heat.

Add:

1 T honey or brown sugar

1 t salt

1 T vinegar

4 cloves chopped garlic

Caramelise for a few minutes until it starts to get a bit sticky and
darken. Be careful not to burn the garlic. If it looks like it will,
add 1/2 cup of water.

Add:

3-4 cups of beef stock

grated zest of 1 lemon

triple nip of brandy

1 T grated fresh/frozen ginger

ground black pepper

1 t yellow mustard seeds

small squirt of soya sauce

1/2 grated nutmeg

Simmer gently for 10 minutes

Add

2 cups chopped Black Tuscan Kale

Simmer for 2 minutes. Serve.

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From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand.
All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public
domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished.
If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

Friday, 21 August 2009

WAITATI EDIBLE GARDENS column

WAITATI EDIBLE GARDENS

By Lynnaire Johnston

The recent changes in temperature, although welcome, do not
necessarily mean that we gardeners should be rushing into planting our
spring vegetables. Rather, we should be holding tight to our
enthusiasm and instead be patient. The soil needs to warm up first and
vegetables planted now may struggle to thrive. Waiting a few weeks
longer will ensure happy, healthy plants that reward you with a great
crop come summer.

Instead, there are a great many other chores which can be tackled now.
Your lavender bushes can be trimmed for a more shapely bush and an
abundance of flowers.

It's time to tidy up winter annuals and shrubs, consigning all the
detritus to the compost bin. This will give spring growth the best
possible start.

Put lime around your fruit trees if your soil is depleted and your
crops poor. And, get rid of any grass around those that are still
small so they have to compete for nutrients.

If you are lucky enough to have a grapevine, give that a good cut back
before the sap starts to rise.

Add plenty of mulch to your garden so that it has time to start adding
nutrients to the soil before planting begins in earnest. Straw,
sawdust (untreated, of course!), pea straw and shreddings all make
excellent mulch.

And, finally, spend what little remains of your winter down-time –
before it becomes insanely busy in the garden – to plan your garden
for summer. The latest plant and seed catalogues are out now, so
choose your new season's cropping adventures so that once the soil is
ready for you, you can be ready for it!

WEGgies initiatives

The WEGgies have been busy planning over winter and are keen to get
moving once spring is truly with us. There's the open orchard
initiative, plans for allotments, the community garden, upcoming
garden tours and the harvest markets all being thought about,
discussed and planned. To help all these along, there will be a
meeting of the WEGgies on Monday September 1, at 7.30pm. Any WEGies
keen to advance these initiatives and plans are invited to attend.
Venue is the Village Potager, 5 Foyle St, Waitati. For catering
purposes, please phone 482 1364 or email lynnaire@wordwizard.co.nz if
you intend coming.

Dear Aunt Lucy

Seaweed is said to be excellent for the garden. What kind should I
use, where can I find a good source and how should it be applied?

Yours,

Seaweeder

Dear Seaweeder,

Seaweed has unique attributes: a fertilizer that is rich in beneficial
trace minerals (which are generally lacking in New Zealand soils);
rich in hormones that stimulate plant growth and containing little
cellulose so it is easier to compost down.

Seaweed shares no diseases with land plants and contains no land weed
seeds. Eel/sea grass (Zostera novazelandica), sea lettuce (thin,
bright green stuff – Ulva sp); giant/bladder kelp (Macrocystis
pyrifera) and bull kelp (Durvillia antarctica – the big browns which
come up after storms) are all common seaweeds that wash up on beaches.

Eel grass is best collected from banks along the harbour edge while
sea lettuce can be found inside Blueskin Bay. Big browns wash up all
along exposed beaches (Warrington, Doctors Point). Big browns need the
most grunt to collect.

The easiest (read laziest) way to use is it as a mulch. Chuck a thick
layer on garden beds, around fruit trees and berry bushes with gay
abandon .Otherwise layer it into a compost pile to break down with
something more fibery (leaves or hay). Both ways deliciously dark
crumbly soil will result. Worried about salt on the garden? Rinse it
if you can, but if you can't, it will still be fine (it rains lots
here) and worms don't seem to mind.

Keener beans than I make tinctures by steeping seaweed in a barrel of
water or rotting it in a barrel and collecting the leachate. This is a
bit more work and absolutely stinks but is very effective as a
nourishing garden tea (dilute 20:1). Don't be tempted to cook it as
this destroys all the good bits. Commercially (cold pressed liquid
kelp), they use some kind of reverse pressure chamber to explode the
cells and liquify the material without heat.

Lastly, before you all rapturously rush out there to rape and pillage
the intertidal, remember that seaweed is a natural resource. If not
above the high tide mark, it will be re-immersed and continue its own
self advancement. If above the high tide, it's degradation will be
providing nourishment and shelter for a whole host of intertidal
organisms: baby clams, snails, sand fleas, crabs (in turn, food for
seabirds). So, try not to be too efficient and make sure you leave
bits behind for them.

Lots of love,

Aunt Lucy xxx

--
--
From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand.
All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public
domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished.
If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

Photo: Double the potential

Lindsay Eaves of Windflow Technology records the wind potential on
Double Hill near Waitati, watched by University of Otago Geography
students Seth, Lydia and Alice. Photo supplied by Waitati Energy
Project.

WARRINGTON SCHOOL (column)

WARRINGTON SCHOOL

by school staff and Peter Dowden

Our newly extended building

We had a wonderful start to the term with children and staff arriving
back to lots of
changes. Now the School has a new admin and multi-purpose room, new
doors in the staffroom and library and more light and better flow
around the school. Both Room One and Two have been enlarged. There are
exciting ideas for the extension area with a nature table and display
spaces planned and we are on the lookout for unwanted barometers and
clocks for this area.

The Multi-Purpose Room is available out of school hours (and within
school hours by negotiation) for the use of community groups within
the Warrington
area.

Windows and doors left over from our refurbishment are available for a
donation to the school.

The new extensions will be officially launched at our "Devonshire Tea"
Opening on Sunday 20 September 11-1pm. This is an open invitation to
all members of the Warrington community.

Welcome Renee

Room 1 pupils have welcomed their new teacher Renee van Tuel while
Trisha Korth is away in Antarctica.

Open computing

The school is now running 100% Ubuntu as its computer operating system
on its computers. This feat was mentioned in two national publications
recently, and Warrington School is nationally a leader in the use of
open-source software.

Warrington School is the first school in New Zealand to implement a
portal page on WikiEducator under Aotearoa's Open Education Resource
(OER) commons, a free hosting service for all New Zealand schools. Our
teachers will be learning how to use a wiki under the Learning4Content
project - the world's largest attempt to develop wiki skills for
education.

Software Freedom Day: Thursday 17 September

Join the School in celebrating Software Freedom on Thursday 17
September: a computer evening that will give an opportunity for
interested people to look at what we are doing with our computers,
sharing secrets on Free Software installation and why the school is
using GNU/Linux. Learn about software freedom, learn how to install
free operating systems and free applications, learn about
WikiEducator. All day activities at the school with the pupils sharing
their Free Software skills. Evening workshop starting at 7pm - cost =
FREE.

E-day: bring us your computer waste

Warrington School will be a collection spot for the community's broken
and unusable computer equipment, which needs to be dropped off at
school by Friday 11 September, and will be then taken to the Dunedin
e-waste collection centre on Saturday September 12.

Other news

Swine flu is around: the school will continue with the message of good
hygiene practices.

Many of the senior pupils have been arriving at school with hammers
and saws for the Eco-hut challenge. There are a few huts springing up
around the school.

Room 3 storywriting:

Today my Dad brought my dirt bike. It is a PW50 and it is a Yamaha and
it is a blue dirt bike. - Mikey

My house is big and it is very cool. Molly has a cool bedroom. - Harry

I am Oscar. I go to school. I am very funny. I am good at maths. I am
in room 3. I love playing. - Oscar

Yesterday we went on Harold's classroom with Jackie and we learnt
about air. - Dion

Dates

Wed 2-Thurs 3 September: Parent Interviews
Tuesday 8 September: Cross-country
Friday 11 September: E-waste drop-off deadline
Thursday 17 September: Software Freedom Day: all day demonstrations
and 7pm workshop
Sunday 20 September 11-1pm: "Devonshire Tea" opening of school
extensions - public welcome

--
--
From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand.
All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public
domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished.
If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

MP clinic times for September

PETE HODGSON MP Dunedin North

Next MP clinics for your
community are:
Monday 14th September 2009
1:30pm Waikouaiti Library
2:30pm Waitati Library

MP Office
32 Albany Street, Dunedin
Ph: 03 4741973
Fax: 03 4749913
Email: pete@petehodgson.co.nz

PHOTO: Blueskin Bay Library extension model

Photo supplied by Alasdair Morrison, Waikouaiti Coast Community Board

Blueskin Bay radio news for Friday August 21

Puketapu Radio presents Blueskin Bay local news in association with blueskin.co.nz

If you haven’t yet seen ‘Voyeur’ at the Gallery on Blueskin, your last chance is tomorrow. Megan Ransom’s naughty and risqué bronze sculpture exhibition is making its way round the country and is about to leave Blueskin Bay..

Salsa dance lessons for adults have been so popular in Waitati over recent months that classes are now being held for children. Teacher Rozalina Stoyanova has developed lessons for youngsters which are held each Thursday from 5.30 til 6.15pm, before the adults’ class at 7pm. Salsa lessons are held in the Waitati Hall.

Also proving popular are Tuesday night’s Qi-Gong classes. These are held at the Waitati Hall at 6.30, which leaves enough time to get along to the Tuesday night movie. Qi-Gong is a type of tai chi and has physical and emotional benefits.

The Waitati Film Society’s offering next week is Travel and Counterculture, a collection of short films by the doyenne of the French new wave, Agnes Varda. This collection of films focuses on the 1960s counterculture. Movies are held at Bill’s place from 8pm.

The Blueskin Youth Centre Assn holds its next meeting on Monday night. It will be held at the Waitati Hall at 7:30 pm.

The Blueskin Bay local volunteer news website can be found at www.blueskin.co.nz.

 

 

BLUESKIN BAY LIBRARY (column)

By Alasdair Morrison

The updated model of the proposed library expansion is now on display
at the Blueskin Bay Library and the Project Group would welcome your
comments. Appropriate forms are available at the library counter.

The Architect's design statement here gives a good idea of what is planned:

(begins)

It is proposed to demolish the existing library and construct a new
library as an extension to the existing community building.

The interior of the new library has an open plan with the circulation
desk and librarian's office at the hub. This provides excellent
sight-lines to and from all areas, including the playground and with
views of the mature native trees and the Paul Smith memorial.

This is a 'green' building.

Natural ventilation is maximised through strategically placed windows,
roof vents and use of the 'chimney effect' to naturally exhaust air.

Natural lighting is maximised thereby reducing dependence on electric
lighting. All electrical fittings are selected on the basis of energy
efficiency.

Extensive north facing glazing enhances the potential for solar gains.
Thermal storage is possible with floor tiles over the concrete slab.
Energy efficient heat pumps will also heat the concrete slab. Heat
losses are reduced through the use of insulation to the building skin
and by effectively isolating internal spaces from the outside through
the use of an entrance lobby.

The layout of the library allows for flexibility and future uses. The
meeting room is a multi-use space for study, as a staffroom, art
display and meeting room. It can be used independently by community
groups even when the library is closed.

All materials used will be low to zero 'VOC', require low maintenance
and be from renewable resources where possible. Interior finishes
include timber, timber product, paint and carpet tiles. Exterior
cladding is Western Red Cedar and the roofing matches the existing.

(Architect statement ends)

We would welcome your comments by the 20th September. Please feel free
to call Alasdair Morrison or Louise Booth for clarification on any
points.

Note: the plan is to relocate the library collection to Waitati School
during the construction phase.

--
--
From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand.
All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public
domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished.
If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

Thursday, 20 August 2009

Classified ad: CREATIVE MEMORIES

CREATIVE MEMORIES: When and why do you take photos? Where do you keep
photos? How do you share your photos? Let me help you celebrate your
life, your story, your way. Dawn Hope, Creative Memories Consultant
482-2787 or 027-244-9854 dawn_ant@yahoo.co.nz

Wednesday, 19 August 2009

Blueskin Bay Library - September 2009

Greetings again from the library team. Today we advise you of yet
more changes to this dynamic team, progress on the flag, the poetry
project, and the latest about Warrington Outreach and book clubs.


New member of library team.


Welcome to Tania Turei, who has joined us as a much-needed reliever.
As many of you will know, Tania is a local gal, so come down and say
hello.


Flag


Our flag is large, colourful, and distinctively Blueskin Bay, and now,
thanks to Jan Littleton, hanging up near the photocopier. Be sure to
admire its beauty when you come in next. This is the winner of the
flag design competition of Turn-Off-TV week 2005. So much work has
gone into turning it into a reality.


Poetry Project


We have had a bit of a re-think about this. The 2009 issue of
'Blueskin Poets' has had strong support from Waitati and Warrington
schools, but less support from the rest of the community. As our
original hope was that the project might generate a growing interest
in poetry reading and writing, we feel now that perhaps this has hit a
limit. Perhaps we have overworked our small pool of local poets. So
we have decided to abandon plans to raise vast sums of money to fund a
professionally printed book, and we now plan a book similar to the one
we created in 2007 and 2008. Then we will put the idea into recess,
for a while, at least.


In the meantime, we have received some great work from the local
schools, and many entries for the cover competition. But … if you
feel a poem coming on, we can probably still fit it in.


Warrington Outreach


We will be taking the library car to Warrington on Sept 9 and Sept 23.
Having the use of all that space in the new building is wonderful.
Now we can display the books easily and the children have enough room
to browse and make their choices.


Children's Book Clubs


The Warrington Book Club is thriving. This month our enthusiastic
group of readers will meet after school on Wednesday, Sept 23.


We hope to get the Waitati Book Club under way in the summer. We have
some keen readers ready to begin but at the moment they have no free
time.


Louise, Carolyn, Averil, Tania and Bessie

--
--
From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand.
All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public
domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished.
If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

'Voyeur' exhibition at Gallery on Blueskin

A reminder to you all of the "Voyeur" exhibition at Gallery on
Blueskin. This show is travelling the country and is at Gallery on
Blueskin until next Sunday, 23 August.

Bronze sculptural pieces, "something a little bit naughty but
beautifully executed". We are pleased to be able to offer the public
something challenging.

by Louise Burnside

--
--
From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand.
All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public
domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished.
If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

FEATURE: Rozi Dance studio

PHOTO: two dancers from the children's group

by Peter Dowden

Rozalina Stoyanova has recently developed Salsa dance lessons for
children. Formerly from Bulgaria, now living in the Waitati area, Rozi
has been giving salsa dance lessons for adults for several months.

"The idea for the children's classes is to make them curious about
Latino music, singers and dancers, and the history of the styles that
they are learning," Rozi told 'Blueskin News'.

Rozi gives her young dance students print information about the
history and encourages them to search the Internet for more
information about famous dancers and singers. "They also have a CD
with music from the lessons to practice at home, because a dancer has
to dance three times weekly minimum if they want to be a good dancer."

During lessons, Rozi and her students watch DVDs of international
Salsa dance competitions to understand what levels can be reached and
to learn what is happening in the world of Latino dances at the
moment, including trends and the rules of Latino choreography.

"The idea is not only to move, but to understand the art and culture
of the dancing. Only that way a dancer will look wonderful."

Rozi finds that when working with children, "the responsibility is
much bigger. This is not entertainment only. You create the way they
look at the world of music and dance."

Rozi's dance lessons are held every Thursday, Children: 5.30-6.15pm,
Adults: 7-8pm.

--
--
From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand.
All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public
domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished.
If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

WILD BLUESKIN: Benefiting Biodiversity in Blueskin Bay

Benefiting Biodiversity in Blueskin Bay

by Kelvin Lloyd

The Blueskin Bay catchment supports some of the most varied ecosystems
in Dunedin City. From peat bogs on Swampy Summit through the upland
cloud forest that cloaks the higher hills, to lowland alluvial forest,
drought-prone coastal hills, sand dunes, estuaries, and salt marsh.
The area is fortunate enough to retain much of its original ecosystem
diversity, and has a wide range of native birds, lizards, fish, and
invertebrates.

It is encouraging to see some of the more reduced elements, such as
alluvial forest, being restored to better health. The
rapidly-establishing plantings of matai, kowhai, and narrow-leaved
lacebark between the Waitati River and SH1 are evidence of this. Under
such positive management an impressive alluvial terrace forest will be
the not-so-long-term outcome.

Encouraging too, to have a 300ha fenced sanctuary – the Orokonui
Ecosanctuary – nestled in the Blueskin Bay hills. This project has
grown from strength to strength since Ralph Allen and I timidly
promoted it to a somewhat defensive local community back in 2002. My
vision for the Ecosanctuary is a thriving indigenous ecosystem which
will surprise and delight many. A place that is owned and enjoyed by
locals, that involves them, and provides economic benefits through
employing and contracting local people and businesses.

Two years ago my wife and I bought a gorse-infested farm in the hills
above the Bay. It had some nice rimu-miro forest on it, in good
enough nick to attract funding from the DOC-administered Biodiversity
Condition Fund for fencing to exclude stock. With additional support
from the QEII National Trust, we will place a protective covenant over
the forest and fence off our stream also. On our poorly-producing farm
we could never have afforded to do this without the assistance of
these funders. I have to say it would be a rare biodiversity fence
that didn't benefit the adjacent farming operation. No longer will our
stock hide in the forest at mustering time, and the biodiversity fence
will provide an excellent boundary to which we can join future fences
to reduce paddock sizes.

We received Biodiversity Advice funding for a stream survey and found
a surprising number of Banded Kokopu in our little creek, though none
were found in the best-quality habitat upstream of a hanging culvert.
Many of our native fish are good climbers, but they can't climb
overhanging structures such as this, which are a major cause of loss
of fish passage up streams. Happily, I have recently heard that
juvenile galaxiids in the Waikato are able to climb polypropylene rope
used to rear mussel spat. As there is no reason to believe our
southern fish are not equally good climbers, this technique has
promise as an elegant, low-cost method of restoring fish passage to
upstream areas.

Careys Creek and Orokonui Creek are significant streams for native
fish, with over ten native species in each: excellent diversity. In
our own little creek we found a single Long-finned Eel, together with
many Koura (freshwater crayfish), and an uncommon Isopod in addition
to the Banded Kokopu. The aquatic report recommended a survey of
downstream fish passages, and hopefully this project, which is being
run by our downstream neighbours, will also be funded by the Advice
Fund.

It is good to see other local groups cottoning on to national funds
such as the Biodiversity Condition and Advice Funds. The Orokonui
Ecosanctuary has benefited from this, as has the Warrington Reserve
Group, aiming to restore indigenous vegetation to the Warrington Beach
dunes. The last decade has seen increasing levels of financial support
for biodiversity management on private land. More recently the
Community Conservation Fund was developed to provide local groups with
funding support for biodiversity projects on public land, although
under the current government this fund will unfortunately be canned.

Biodiversity funds have a range of criteria and it is good to satisfy
as many of them as you can. Sites on land environments from which most
indigenous vegetation has been cleared, and habitats that support
nationally-threatened species are more likely to receive funding.
Having good quality recent information on the biodiversity values
present, and the threats to them, will help your application
enormously. So too are projects that demonstrate commitment and
contribution from the applicant and have certainty regarding benefits
to indigenous biodiversity. It is also a good idea, though not
essential, to involve more than one funding agency in your project,
which both reduces the cost to each, and demonstrates wider support.

We have been happy to support local businesses and contractors with
the national funding that our biodiversity projects have brought to
the bay. We thank Cargill Contracting, Ryder Consulting, Greg Oliver,
and Blueskin Nursery for assistance with our projects.

Information on the Biodiversity Condition and Advice Funds can be
obtained by contacting Stephanie Weller at biofunds@doc.govt.nz or on
www.biofunds.govt.nz. Information on the QEII Trust and its activities
are available on www.nationaltrust.org.nz - the Coastal Otago
representative is Rob Campbell (03 439 4333). The Dunedin City Council
also has a local biodiversity fund to which private landholders can
apply. Debbie Hogan is the contact for this fund (03 477 3331).

So what are you waiting for? The biodiversity condition and advice
funds aim to support bottom-up projects and have no regulatory
implications. QEII National Trust can provide significant assistance
with fencing in return for covenanting, and ongoing advice and
monitoring of your covenant. The DCC fund is primarily intended to
help landholders to manage areas of significant indigenous vegetation
and/or indigenous fauna habitat that occur on their properties. All of
these funds provide financial incentives to assist with management of
biodiversity values on private land. Don't perceive the biodiversity
values of your property as a constraint: they may provide significant
opportunities.

(Kelvin Lloyd is an ecologist at Wildland Consultants Ltd, Dunedin)

--
--
From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand.
All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public
domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished.
If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

NOTICE: Blueskin Youth Centre Assn next meeting

The next meeting of the Blueskin Youth Centre Assn will be held at the
Waitati Hall at 7:30 pm on Monday 24th August.

Jane Hailes.

Tuesday, 18 August 2009

Frilly Frock - Traditional Dancing in North East Valley

By Marilyn August

"Traditional European dancing", the notice said. "Thursday evenings".

I hadn't danced anything with steps in it for forty-five years, except
for a brief tussle with the Charleston for the curtain call of a play.
I have two left feet and a chronic inability to follow instructions or
hear musical rhythm. Who me? Dance? And a little voice said: "Why
not?" So I went along and I muddled through. After six weeks my two
left feet had miraculously transformed themselves into a right and a
left. I was actually beginning
to relax and not have to think about what I was doing. Well, most of
the time. I could hear the music and I knew when the beats came and
what my body should be doing.

I have learnt twelve different dances from a variety of periods, some
of them couple dances, some of them small group or line or circle
dances. I am longing to put on a frilly frock and go to a ball.
Although we are a tiny group - more people please - we are having
enormous fun. Some of us could dance before but some, like me, have
dived off the deep end. However, none of this seems to matter. Kate
just assumes we will end up able to do it. She works away patiently
and it all comes together with amazing speed. I really like the
concentration required and the feeling of freedom that comes when your
body knows a sequence and can just go with the music.

This is a class that I can really recommend.


Traditional dancing from France (and beyond)
Thursday 6pm to 7:30pm
Beginners most welcome - Casual atmosphere - $5
Baptist Church hall 270 North Road
North East Valley
Tutor: Kate Grace
kategrace@clear.net.nz/Tel: 473 6488

--
--
From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand.
All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public
domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished.
If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

Thursday, 13 August 2009

Blueskin Bay radio news for Friday August 14

 

Puketapu Radio presents Blueskin Bay local news in association with blueskin.co.nz

Megan Ransom is an artist who likes to titillate, if not shock. Her exhibition of bronze sculpture – Voyeur – opens at Gallery on Blueskin tonight at 6pm. As it is touring the country, this is only a short exhibition – running only until August 23. Megan describes her work as a bit naughty and risqué.

Also tonight is the annual general meeting of the Warrington Surf Lifesaving Club. It’s a 7pm start in the clubrooms. The club invites everyone with an interest in furthering the interests of the club to come along.

On the gardening front, plans are underway for the WEGgies garden tours this summer. Convenor Lucy Jack is keen to hear from people with ideas about gardens to visit, and what people would like to learn about. See elsewhere on this  website for more.

Also on plant matters, the Blueskin Bay Garden Club tomorrow heads off to Astonville Nurseries followed by a visit to former member, Betty Moore, who now lives in St Clair. If you would like to join this expedition, meet opposite the Blueskin store just before 1.30 tomorrow afternoon.

Next Tuesday it’s back to Qi-Gong classes for those keen to improve their fitness and wellbeing. Classes are held at the Waitati Hall at 6.30pm. This leaves you enough time to head off to the movies at the Film Society, held at Bill’s Place in Orokonui Road at 8pm. Next week’s offering is Marti: The Passionate Eye, which traces the dramatic story of leading kiwi photographer, Marti Friedlander.  Movies start at 8pm.

The Blueskin Bay local volunteer news website can be found at www.blueskin.co.nz.

 

 

Thursday, 6 August 2009

VOYEUR

Gallery on Blueskin invites you to the opening of "VOYEUR"

"VOYEUR", an exhibition aimed at Wellington's alternative and artistic
communities, is now travelling the country and will be at Gallery on
Blueskin in Waitati for a week from August 14.

Nine works by bronze sculptor Megan Ransom will feature in Voyeur,
which received rave reviews when it featured at the S & M's Cocktail
Bar in Cuba Street on 27 March 2009. The show will travel first to
Auckland, where it is being held at the well known Gay bar, Kamo in
K.Road. After Dunedin, it will be at 12 Bar in Queenstown, to coincide
with Gay ski week.

Megan says she is deliberately targeting the alternative market with
her first solo exhibition in bronze sculpture. She describes the work
as "a bit naughty and risque" and says she wanted to have some fun
making the pieces."The works will definitely be conversation pieces in
people's homes," she says. "Sculpture can be fun, voluptuous and
erotic. What I'm doing is pushing the boundaries and breaking with
convention".

This show was inspired by the famous illustrator Aubrey Beardsley,
whose work was extremely risque in the nineteenth century. An artist
for the past 20 years, Megan has been a fashion designer and
contemporary visual artist. She turned to sculpture three years ago
and believes she is the only female sculptor in New Zealand, if not in
Australasia, involved in the complete process of sculpting – from the
moulding and the bronze pour to the grinding, welding and finishing.

The show will have a public opening on Friday 14 August, from 6pm.
Gallery on Blueskin is just 15 minutes north of Dunedin at 1 Harvey
St, Waitati. The gallery is excited to have the opportunity to host
this show. It should spark a lot of interest and hopefully challenge
people a little. For further inquiries, phone (03) 4822080.

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From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand.
All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public
domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished.
If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

Wednesday, 5 August 2009

Blueskin Bay radio news for Friday August 7

 

Puketapu Radio presents Blueskin Bay local news in association with blueskin.co.nz

 

Despite a lack of sunshine, many buyers and sellers turned out in droves for the first birthday of the Seacliff market last Sunday. Live music, birthday cake and general celebratory behaviour marked the occasion. The market is held on the first Sunday of each month on Coast Road, Seacliff and features a wide range of locally made and grown items.

 

Planting of the Waitati community garden for spring is underway with 300 cloves of garlic put into the ground last Saturday. However, a lack of willing hands mean there is still the same again to go so there will be another attempt this Saturday afternoon at 1.30 pm. The community garden is on Mount Cargill Rd, on the right, not far past the school.

 

Sunday is the final day of the Angela Burns art exhibition at Gallery on Blueskin. Entitled Towards the Bay, this exhibition has been very popular with locals and visitors alike in the two weeks it has been running. The Gallery is open from Tuesday to Sunday each week.

 

Qi-Gong classes are well underway at Waitati Hall for those interested in achieving the health and mental benefits offered by this cousin of tai chi.

Classes are held each Tuesday night at 6.30 and everyone is welcome.

 

This week’s Waitati Film Society movie is The Thin Red Line, with looks at deep conflicts between the Japanese entrenched on Guadalcanal Island and between individuals in the US forces attempting to regain the island. Each soldier has his own agenda, whether simply just to stay alive or not to waste others’ lives, or to make their name as a heroic military leader. Movies are shown at Bill’s Place on Orokonui Rd at 8pm on Tuesday nights.

 

The Blueskin Bay local volunteer news website can be found at www.blueskin.co.nz.

 

Saturday, 1 August 2009

Blueskin Bay radio news for Friday July 31

 

Puketapu Radio presents Blueskin Bay local news in association with blueskin.co.nz

 

It’s the first weekend of the month again, and that means Seacliff market on Sunday. If you haven’t yet been to the market you’re missing great coffee, excellent preserves, wonderful cakes and fantastic potatoes. There’s also bric-a-brac, books, artwork and other locally made handicrafts. The market is held on Coast Rd from 11am to 2pm.

 

The Waitati Film Society takes a break this week but is back on Tuesday Aug 11 with The Thin Red Line, with looks at deep conflicts between the Japanese entrenched on Guadalcanal Island and between individuals in the US forces attempting to regain the island. Each soldier has his own agenda, whether simply just to stay alive or not to waste others’ lives, or to make their name as a heroic military leader. Movies are shown at Bill’s Place on Orokonui Rd at 8pm.

 

The Waitati branch of the Dunedin Rudolf Steiner School Playgroup meets on Wednesday mornings in the small room off the Waitati Hall.

Adults have an opportunity to learn more about Steiner education while the children enjoy playing with toys made of natural materials. The sessions incorporate songs, games, stories, outdoor play and a shared morning tea. If you have a child under three and are interested in joining, please phone Nick, 478 041.

 

The latest edition of Blueskin News will be delivered to letter boxes this weekend. Check it out for details of other events happening around the bay or look on the website, www.blueskin.co.nz.

 

The Blueskin Bay local volunteer news website can be found at www.blueskin.co.nz.