Wednesday, 30 July 2008

Police Community Report, July 08

Last month, police highlighted a problem with boy racers entering the
Warrington Domain late on Friday and Saturday nights, causing all
sorts of problems. On the weekend of the 27 June 2008, local police
with support from Dunedin stopped a drive train of about 15 vehicles
at the intersection of State Highway One and Coast Road, Karitane. The
vehicles had driven through Warrington however did not remain,
continuing through to Karitane.

Police spoke with the drivers and Infringement Notices were issued
where appropriate, the group were mainly older teenagers or those in
their early twenties, most vehicles were carrying passengers. It
appeared there was a core within the group that were known to each
other however most involved were simply following the lead vehicle.
The drive train was instructed to return to Dunedin and advised to
stay away from Warrington and surrounding areas as recent traffic
offending there had worn thin the patients of local residents.

Those who own trail bikes, boats containing removable fuel containers,
or businesses which store or hold large quantities of fuel need to be
aware that these items are currently being targeted by criminals. A
number of fuel thefts have occurred at Palmerston, Waikouaiti and
Karitane, with two trail bike thefts having been committed in
Waikouaiti this month. Police would strongly urge people to secure
these items and consider improving lighting around their properties.

A recent early morning weekend prank where a trail bike was taken from
a Beach Street address has highlighted the need for communities to
play their part in crime prevention. Several neighbours were woken by
the fracas, but no one called police. I cannot stress enough that if
you notice something or someone acting suspicious then please call
police. Waikouaiti Police would like to hear from the pranksters
sooner rather than later, to offer an explanation for their actions.

In the early hours of Thursday 17 July 2008, three young people from
Dunedin were apprehended by Oamaru Police after breaking into two
vehicles parked outside DK Autos Waikouaiti. In addition the trio
admitted to committing a significant number of recent vehicle thefts
in Dunedin, they are currently being dealt with by way of prosecution.

This month local police dealt with a local man who thought it was a
good idea to grow cannabis at a vacant Waikouaiti address. The
cannabis and growing equipment were located and recovered by police,
the man has admitted his part and this matter is now before the Court.

Remember if you require information regarding road conditions
telephone Transit New Zealand on 0800 44 44 49.

If you see anything suspicious or if you wish to speak to the Police
regarding any other matter you can contact us on 03 465 9127. In
emergencies dial 111. Until next month, take care.

Constable Jon-Paul Tremain
New Zealand Police
Waikouaiti

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From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand.
All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public
domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished.
If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

BLUESKIN BOOK CLUB

The first meeting of the Blueskin Book Club was held on Monday 14 at
the Blueskin Bay Cafe at 10am. Five members attended for a coffee and
a chat.

It was agreed that future meetings would be held on the 1st Tuesday of
the month at 10am at the Blueskin Bay Cafe. However please note that
the August and September meetings will be held at 12 noon to
accommodate those attending the Sustainable Living Programme.

BOOKS REVIEWED:

That Old Ace In The Hole, by Annie Proulx, reviewed by Elizabeth Knife
Omnivore's Dilemma, by Michael Pollen, reviewed by Linda Charlton

If you would like further information ring Elizabeth 4821025 or join
us on Tuesday 5 August at midday, Blueskin Bay Cafe.

by Elizabeth Knife


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From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand.
All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public
domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished.
If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

Wednesday, 23 July 2008

Spirit of '81 returns . . . councils have botha fight

A group of local people are intending to send a Blueskin Bay
delegation to join a protest march organised by Stop the Stadium on
Saturday 2 August.

"Some of us think we can still challenge this project," protester
Geraldine Tait told Blueskin News. "Was the Springbok Tour of 1981 the
last time anyone went out and protested? Well here's a chance to voice
their concerns about a really big issue."

"With budgets already stretched by rising fuel and food prices,
ratepayers don't need the Dunedin City Council or the Otago Regional
Council to be making long term commitments to 'think big' projects
that will lead to major
rates rises," Geraldine said.

The delegation will be car pooling from Waitati at the Blueskin Bay
Library at 11.15am, in time for the 12 Noon start of the march from
the Dental School to the Octagon. For information: Geraldine 482 2517.

by the editors

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From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand.
All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public
domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished.
If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

Derek's Garden Diary

Optimistic Gardening

The buds on the plum tree in my garden are showing a touch of white
and the first flowers will be out by the time you read this, yet some
of the hardest frosts and heaviest snowfalls of the winter occur in
August. Around the Bay, spring is a stop-go, on-off, unpredictable,
fickle season. One minute the sun warms the earth and you guiltily
rush out into the neglected vegetable garden to plant carrots amid
daffodils dancing in a northerly breeze and the next, the daffodils
are flattened by a sleet-filled southerly and you can feel the frost
in the air the minute the sun goes down behind the Silverpeaks. If you
are determined to be outside then you can supplement your supply of
broad beans by planting more seeds now, but they are unlikely be ready
much before December. The best plan is to plant seeds indoors.
Cabbages, broccoli, cauliflower, spinach, silverbeet and leafy
lettuces will be ready to plant out in 3-5 weeks by late August and
early September, so that if the Spring weather does arrive, they will
be set to get going early.

I plant seeds in rectangular plastic margarine containers with a few
holes cut in the base and put these on plastic trays that supermarkets
pack meat and the like in. Raid your neighbours' recycle bin if like
me you rarely buy these things. They line up neatly along a
windowsill. Cover with newspaper and a piece of glass, if you have it,
until germination takes place. Lettuce will germinate in a few days,
cabbages and the like take a bit longer. I usually buy seed-raising or
potting mix these days and add a little coarse sand (salt-free, from a
creek, not the beach) to improve drainage as things can get a little
soggy otherwise and seedlings may rot. Organic, non-peat based mix is
environmentally friendlier.

If you really feel spring is imminent then you can speed up the
process by putting the containers alongside the hot-water cylinder but
make sure you water them regularly and remove them before the seeds
become long, pale and attenuated in search of light. Watch out also
that they do not get too hot, as some seeds, especially those of
plants that like cool damp conditions, lettuce are a good example,
will not germinate at all. at high temperatures.

By the end of August though, it is worth being an optimist. Anticipate
a fine warm spring and plant those carrots, spring onions, mesclun
greens, maybe even peas, direct into the garden. You may be lucky or
you may have to plant all over again a month or so later.

Broad beans planted last autumn will start to show signs of flowering
soon, much too early for the long-tongued bumble bees that are
necessary to pollinate them and guarantee beans in the pods. There are
bumble bees around in August but they are the short-tongued variety
that make a hole at the base of the flower to get the nectar, opting
out of bustling past the sexual bits, picking up pollen and
transferring it to the stigma. Try slowing down the beans by picking
out the top – the couple of centimetres of buds and leaves that are
not fully expanded (you can eat these raw or lightly steamed). This
will make the plant send out new shoots from low down on the stem. It
will flower later and as an added bonus, will not get so tall and
straggly and require less string and fewer sticks to support it when
those September blizzards hit.

--
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From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand.
All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public
domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished.
If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

OROKONUI ECOSANCTUARY

Momentum is picking up with resource consent and building consent for
the Visitor and Education Centre both having been approved. And now
the icing on the cake – funding has been received from the Lotteries
Significant Projects Fund enabling construction to commence soon.

The pest eradication will continue for another couple of months yet.
The several hares have evaded carrots, spotlights and dogs but
internal hare fences and trapping are beginning to have an effect.
Recently twelve dogs and four handlers combed the ecosanctuary from
top to bottom for possums and found nothing. Monitoring for rodents
and mustelids remains clear also. But that is not the end of the
story. In fact the pest eradication/checking, although in its final
stage remains a huge and complex task involving highly specialised
tracker dogs and personnel as well as pulsing and adapting strategies
and targeting of pest species at different times.

There has been a great response to the planting days and almost 2500
plants have gone in. We have run out of plants for the moment and so
the next work days will be more generalised in nature. Please ring
Valerie on 482 2806 the night before if you intend going. Scheduled
days are the 4th, 9th, 18th, and 23rd of August.

The Kea is well known as a very intelligent bird but it appears its
cousin the Kaka is not too far behind. As a winter pick me up the Kaka
have been fed an artificial nectar mix. The Invercargill juveniles had
some difficulty drinking from the container until one of them hit on
the idea of using a twig to dip in and then suck the nectar mix off
the twig!

For enquiries the office number is 482 1755. For further information
on the ecosanctuary, visit www.orokonui.org.nz or see our box at the
Blueskin Bay Library.

by Sue Hensley

--
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From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand.
All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public
domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished.
If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

Tuesday, 22 July 2008

Waikouaiti Coast Community Board

The Fluoride Issue

At our last meeting we endorsed a concept, put forward by the DCC
Water Department, of holding a briefing for all elected members on the
subject of fluoridation of drinking water, with the proviso that both
sides of the argument would be put forward. At the Infrastructure
Services Committee Meeting on 21 July a majority of Councillors voted
for this concept. Consequently, all Councillors and Community Board
Members will be invited to attend a briefing in the very near future
to learn more about this rather complex and technical subject.
Representatives from the Otago District Health Board and from the
Fluoride Action Network will present the case for and against
fluoridating drinking water supplies. We look forward to improving our
scant knowledge of this subject and we will report back to you,
hopefully in next month's issue.

W3 Ride Share

Board members are pleased to able to support this worthwhile
initiative. We are co-ordinating sponsorship and assistance for the
organisers of the scheme. In particular we would like to convey our
appreciation to the following:

Road Materials Workgear for sponsorship of the arm bands

Hall Bros Transport Ltd. for providing bicycle stands

Blasting & Coating Services Ltd. for blasting & painting the bicycle stands

Caledonian Marine & Engineering Services Ltd for modifying the bicycle
stands and also for printing & artwork

Speed Limit Review

This review is due again later in the year. Once again we will be
conveying our concerns about roading speed issues, in particular the
whole of Coast Road from Warrington to Karitane. We will keep you
informed.

Mega Skips

We have asked Council to revert to having the mega skips at Warrington
Domain three times a year. We will report back on the response to our
request.

Warrington Domain

We expect the Camper Van Effluent Dump Site to be moved to its new
location by early October.

Our next meeting will be held on 3 September at Waitati Hall, starting
with a Public Forum at 5.30pm.

Please feel free to contact any of Board Members with any issues you may have:

Alasdair Morrison, Chairperson Ph 482 2505

Nancy Higgins Ph 482 1198

Geraldine Tait, Deputy Chairperson Ph 482 2517

Murray Holland Ph 465 7482

Andy Barratt Ph 021 890 048

Cr Andrew Noone Ph 465 7157

Gerard Collings Ph 465 7604

by Alasdair Morrison

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From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand.
All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public
domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished.
If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

Household Energy: Recommendations for Blueskin Bay households

Household Energy: Recommendations for Blueskin Bay households

Having visited a number of properties within Waitati and seen a
varying number of styles of houses, here are some simple
recommendations.

In terms of heat losses, various figures are quoted for losses from
different parts of houses. The following show some of the different
figures that are quoted from various sources:-

Ceiling/roof 30-42%

Walls 18-25%

Floors 10-14%

Windows 12-31%

Drafts 6-12%

Roof insulation

In terms of what provides the best value, the first and most obvious
place to insulate is the top of the building, that is the ceiling or
roof. Heat rises and so putting a lid on is the obvious, best option.

Older ceilings that have either no insulation, displaced materials
such as paper or the original required minimum of about 70mm of pink
batts will benefit from adding additional insulation. The thicker that
you can afford, the better the resulting insulation and the longer
that heat will be retained in the building. This is an important thing
to remember. Heat is like beer, you only rent it! Regardless of the
level of insulation in a building, sooner or later it will find a way
out. The idea is to slow the process down and to limit the quantity of
heat that has to be provided in order to feel comfortable.

Where there is already some insulation inside a roof space this will
normally be laid in line with and between the ceiling joists. Draping
new insulation across the original materials at right angles will
create a further useful air space and provide better insulation than
packing it on top and in the same direction.

Where people have cold water tanks in loft spaces it is important to
leave the ceiling beneath the tanks uninsulated. This allows a small
amount of heat to warm the water within the tank and help to prevent
it freezing. Cladding cold water tanks with insulation tied around
them, fitting an insulated cover to the top and insulating pipework
within the roof space can also help minimise the risk of freezing
pipes.

Floor insulation

With solid floors there is nothing that can be done structurally to
insulate it after construction. The only option with existing solid
floors is to insulate people from the floor by use of carpets and
carpet underlays. People wear shoes and slippers to help prevent their
feet from coming into contact with cold surfaces because body heat
will be conducted away very quickly.

With suspended timber floors there are a variety of ways in which they
can be insulated to help reduce heat losses and also to help prevent
cold air from being drawn into houses. Older tongued and grooved
floorboards, or even worse square edged floorboards, can allow cold
air to enter buildings.

Rigid expanded plastic materials such as Expol (this is not the only
one available) can be easily fitted in place on a DIY basis. Care has
to be taken that gaps are not left around pipes and services and it is
also worth taking a plan to show where such services are located
before fitting the material. Such materials are either an interference
fit or possible securing clips or nails may be required to prevent
them falling loose. If such fixings are needed, care must be taken to
ensure that they are well clear of services such as pipes and electric
cables. If in doubt, consult a plumber or electrician.

Other options for floors include foil sheets or composite foil and
insulation products. Foil on its own is probably the least favourable
option but foil composites incorporate bulk insulation are also
available and these also act as a vapour barrier to prevent floor
timbers from becoming damp. When adding insulation materials regard
must be had to ensuring that necessary ventilation is not obstructed.
Under floors, adding insulation also provides a useful opportunity to
check that ventilator grills are clear so as to allow cross
ventilation of the floor space.

Draft proofing

Flexible seals are readily available to draft proof doors and most
types of windows. Double hung sash windows can be the hardest to deal
with because over time components such as parting beads become loose
and the sashes no longer slide as easily as they should.

For most doors and windows compressible seals with self adhesive
backing strips are easily fitted to rebates. For harder to deal with
windows such as sliding sashes, seals that have a plastic or metal
carrier strip and which are fitted to frames so as to press against
the sashes are a better option.

Curtains and windows

Curtains which incorporate a thermal lining will help to retain a
considerable amount of warmth inside a building, particularly when
they are mounted underneath pelmet boards that extend back to the
wall. These may look a little old fashioned but it helps to prevent
air currents behind the curtains.

Single glazed windows can also be improved by means of products such
as 3M 'Window Warmers'. These are packs of clear plastic film that are
attached to frames using double sided adhesive tape. The film is then
heat shrunk to a tight finish using a normal hair dryer. Some windows
can be harder to treat using this system where there are inadequate
rebates capable of providing adhesion, loose or flaking paintwork or
perished surfaces.

The overall effect of better curtains and plastic films such as
'Window warmers' can be to bring single glazed windows almost up to a
double glazed standard.

Hot water systems

The most obvious low cost method of making the most of the hot water
system is to insulate exposed pipes. Whilst this is obvious in
relation to hot water pipes, insulating cold pipes can also be an
advantage in helping to prevent frozen pipes as well as reduce the
amount of heat that cold water entering the hot water system.

Wet backs provide a useful amount of cheap heat that would otherwise
be wasted. In some instances it may also be possible to fit one or
more radiators on to a wet back system but this is obviously
introducing higher costs because this would be beyond DIY.

If people have older hot water tanks with little or no insulation,
fitting them with a hot water cylinder jacket can help save a
considerable amount of heat. Such jackets are easily fitted and
secured with straps. For an uninsulated cylinder, such jackets
represent the second best cost saving after ceiling insulation.

Wasting heat

People can also save on energy costs by changing their thinking
towards how they use it. Boiling a full kettle for single cup of
coffee is an obvious example. Leaving lights on within unattended
rooms can also use additional energy. This has to be modified with
some cautions, however. Switching lights off where adequate lighting
is required for safety can be short sighted. Similarly, switching
fluorescent lights on and off in the same way as an incandescent bulb
can also be counter productive. This is because fluorescent lights
will use more power to get started and less to keep going. It is
usually reckoned that a fluorescent light will use the same amount of
energy to get started as it will to run for about 15 minutes.

Another area where people tend to waste heat is in relation to
over-ventilating. This is normally seen in relation to wet areas such
as bathrooms where windows are left open for the whole day in order to
remove moisture generated from showers and baths taken in the morning.
Whilst it is important to remove water vapour to minimise the
potential for condensation, there comes a point when heat is also
being lost excessively. This means that condensation will occur at a
lower temperature because the drop in temperature results in a higher
dew point for the same level of moisture inside the building.
Mechanical fans fitted with a time overrun can improve this situation
but will involve cost. Simply remembering to close the door, open the
windows, shut them after twenty minutes and leaving the door open
thereafter to allow warmth from the rest of the house to enter will
achieve the same result.

Heating systems

Traditional heating systems in our part of the world usually involve
burning solid fuels such as wood or coal. This can be a messy process
and whilst wood, coal and multi-fuel heaters can produce huge amounts
of heat, they tend not to be as easily controlled or as convenient.
Bringing fuel in and removing ash, as well as the dust that is
produced in the process, make such heating less convenient.

Increasingly people are wanting heating sources that are more
controllable and convenient to use. Cost is also an increasingly
important factor.

Sales of heat pumps have soared as people look for more cost effective
solutions that overcome the problems of the traditional methods.
Unfortunately, heat pumps are not always a satisfactory solution.

In houses which have high ceilings, large rooms and low thermal
insulation, heat pumps can fail to generate sufficient heat to achieve
comfortable living conditions. Poorly sited units can also create air
movements which can feel cold and drafty to occupants. The advantages
of heat pumps lie in their ability to deliver more energy than they
require to run but in extremely cold conditions they can also deliver
considerably less heat.

It is therefore important to ensure that the heating systems that are
used, and which can be afforded, suitably match the building type.
This means seeking the right advice before making decisions as to
heating type.

Heat transfer systems can serve a useful purpose where there is excess
heat capacity within a single are. Solid fuel heaters very often
generate far more heat than is necessary for the room where they are
located and heat transfer systems provide a useful method of
delivering that spare capacity to other areas within the house.

There is also an increasingly wide range of choices available for
direct ventilation systems that help to balance moisture levels within
a building, recover useful heat or deliver pre-heated air. The
application of these systems is also beyond the scope of this simple
advice and specialist advice will be necessary to help solve
individual problems.

Walls

For existing timber framed buildings in New Zealand there is no
reliable system available for installing insulation into wall cavities
that does not involve the removal of either the internal or external
skins. Whilst one company advocates the availability of injected
polyurethane foam, the Department of Building and Housing has a very
long list of reasons why this is inadvisable. Not the least of these
is the dangers of toxic, formaldehyde gas that is produced within
buildings over long periods of time after foam is installed.

Possibly the most practical, low cost advice that can be given is to
try and ensure that as much advantage is taken as possible of heat
from the sun. Where houses are subject to shade cutting back foliage
to allow sunshine to reach the house, and if possible to enter the
building, will add a considerable amount of free heat to be gained.
This is particularly true for houses that have what is known as
'thermal mass', i.e. concrete floors or similar that can be warmed up
during the day to give off heat over the evening. Drawing curtains to
allow sunlight in can help warm up solid objects during the day.

If anyone has any specific queries that they would like to ask, please
feel free: brightkiwi@xtra.co.nz

by Bob Draper

--
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From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand.
All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public
domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished.
If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

Waitati Energy Project Column

This month the big event is the Waitati Energy Expo. We're looking
forward to seeing what comes out of the woodwork for the Energy
Efficiency and Innovation Competition. Get thinking and get it
entered! We're also looking forward to seeing what's available in the
commercial and professional presentations: contrary to what you might
believe, we don't 'swim' in energy efficient ideas everyday so it's
good to have the opportunity to find a whole lot of things together in
one space, and also the sparks of ideas that jump about when all these
people are together.

We've got a great range of speakers lined up throughout the day on
diverse topics. The Waitati PTA is putting on food and drink to keep
us fed and watered and there will be entertainment of all sorts (the
list just keeps on growing!). We haven't got everything yet, so if you
have an idea or suggestion then let us know. But bring yourselves,
bring your family and bring your friends, and make it a great Waitati
Energy Event on Sunday the 10th!

Remember the Home Energy Rating Scheme audits? They were donated by
the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Authority to the Waitati Energy
Project. Well that story has become a little complicated. It appears
Bob Draper, the auditor contracted by EECA, resigned just as the
period for the audits was to come due, while the EECA audit funding is
rumoured to have had a time-limit on it. So the audits may not
necessarily be rolled over and at present we are left with two
completed audits out of the total of 21 we were accorded, and a series
of general recommendations. Bob made recommendations following all the
visits he made, and these were to become fully-blown HERS audits. I am
still trying to get to the bottom of all this, as there have been
personnel changes in EECA as well, and no doubt there will be an
update in the next edition of the BN. We certainly appreciate the work
put in so far. However, the possible loss of all those audits . . . .
Nevertheless, it is making one student's life more interesting: Jess
Hughes has been researching the design of the HERS audits, so we'll
have her report to look forward to.

There's more research going on and two bits I will mention briefly
here. The big one is a whole Waitati 'Baseline Energy Survey', funded
and run by the Otago Energy Research Centre. This will evaluate
exactly where we are (in terms of energy) right now. The details of
that are being worked out as I write, but expect to be contacted in
one form or another and asked to take part. The survey will provide us
with valuable information on the Energy needs, forms and use in our
community, and from this we'll be able to shape future actions and
projects, so the more accurate information we can provide, the sharper
our focus can be. The other research you may have heard about is being
conducted by Matthew Hoffman, a student in the OERC. Matthew is
conducting a survey in Waitati on attitudes to small-scale wind
energy. Part of his motivation is the 'Get Smart, Think Small' report
from the Parliamentary Commissioner for the Environment (independent
of the Government) that promotes the adoption of local energy systems
and recommends that community-led initiatives could be aided by
government targets and incentives (something to think about when
politicians come door-knocking). Matthew's research will give us
insight into the depth of opinion in Waitati on small-scale wind and
help gauge receptiveness to the idea, were we ever to go down this
path as a community.

That's more than enough from me for now. Keep warm and make sure you
come along on Sunday 10 August. You can contact me and join the WEP
list by calling 4822249 or emailing: scott.willis@otago.ac.nz

by Scott Willis

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From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand.
All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public
domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished.
If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

WAITATI ENERGY GROUP

ENTER the 'Energy Efficiency and Innovation Competition'

WHEN and WHERE: 10 August 2008, at the Waitati Energy Expo (in the hall).

As part of the Expo we're calling for local entries in this
competition. We're asking you to submit things (or if it's too big, a
detailed description) that demonstrate energy efficiency or innovation
for sustainable energy use. It might be something old, something new,
something borrowed, or anything 'green'. Don't be shy! It's an open
competition, so be creative! Please deliver it to the hall or to me
(Scott Willis), with your name attached, (and 'attn. Scott: Energy
Competition') on the 9th of August. The draw will take place on the
day of the Expo.

by Scott Willis

--
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From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand.
All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public
domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished.
If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

WAITATI EDIBLE GARDENING

MAKING PRODUCTIVE USE OF A SMALL BLOCK: AN INTRODUCTION TO SMALL-SCALE
GROWING FOR PLEASURE AND PROFIT

Afternoon workshop, Sunday 24 August, 1-4pm. Cost $20.

Hosts/tutors: Sue and Andy Barrett.

What will be covered:

* Making decisions: understanding your block, choosing the
right things to grow

* How much to invest

* Gaining skills/expertise

* Managing your block

* Sales and marketing

Including a "walkabout"/question-and-answer session. We will try to
respond to what individual participants bring to the workshop in terms of
their own plans, ideas and experiences.

About us: we bought 17 hectares of bare land in 1993. Since then, we have
been developing it as a mixed small-holding. We began conversion to
organics in 2003 and are now fully certified organic under the Organic
Farm New Zealand certification scheme.

Bookings essential, limited places, please phone Geraldine 4822 517
(or leave a message.)

--
--
From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand.
All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public
domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished.
If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

The shows must go on this Spring in Waitati

The Blueskin Garden Club are getting ready for the Spring Flower Show,
to be held on 28 September, organiser Lyne Carlyle told 'Blueskin
News'. The Show will include categories for flowers, vegetables and
handcrafts and will take place at the Waitati Hall.

Meanwhile, the Blueskin Agricultural and Pastoral Society are
finalising plans for the A&P Clearing Sale and its usual associated
sideshows. This fixture will be moved to the Spring from its
traditional harvest-season timing, organiser Alasdair Morrison told
'Blueskin News'.

Full details of both events will be announced next month.

by the editors

--
--
From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand.
All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public
domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished.
If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

Waitati Energy Expo 2008

Waitati Energy Expo 2008

Sunday 10 August 2008, 10am to 4pm at the Waitati Hall

A melting pot of local energy-conscious technologies and DIY ideas
including presentations, commercial exhibits, information stands,
demonstrations, and innovative concepts.

• Solar and wind energy
• Pedal power
• Sewage treatment options
• Energy efficient vehicles
• Electricity usage meters
• Water collection and storage
• Low carbon wood-burners
• Community woodlot proposals
• And much more

Hands-on: try out new technologies, giveaways. Come and have fun,
catch up with friends, meet interesting new people, and take home a
heap of useful and exciting new ideas.

PLUS! Have you got an energy saving idea or device? Enter it in the
Energy Efficiency and Innovation competition.

MORNING & AFTERNOON TEA/COFFEE AND LUNCH AVAILABLE

If you have any suggestions or need more details, please contact:

Carl Scott: Email: carldscott@yahoo.co.nz Phone: (03) 482 1482 or 027 227 5726

Scott Willis: email: scott.willis@stonebow.otago.ac.nz Phone: (03) 482
2249 or 027 4888 314

Organised by Waitati Energy Project (WEP)


--
--
From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand.
All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public
domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished.
If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

Blueskin Garden Club

For our July meeting the Blueskin Garden Club met on Saturday 12 at
the Warrington Memorial Hall for a craft day where we had a good
turnout of members and friends. We commenced at 10am with morning tea
(and lots of home baking) and then Glenys Clements showed us how to
make brooches.

Glenys had brought along a huge and varied selection of items that we
could use. She had cut out the basic shapes and from there we were
told to use our imagination to create a brooch building up several
layers using different mediums, eg feathers, stamps, buttons to name
but a few. When we were happy with our end product we sprinkled on a
"magic" solution and baked the whole brooch in the oven where the
coating melted resulting in a hard baked surface over the entire
brooch. Following a shared lunch (of gigantic proportions), we then
had the opportunity of continuing with brooches or we could try our
hand at bead making. I think we all surprised ourselves with the
outcome of our handicrafts with some amazing articles being created.
We all had a most enjoyable day and thanks must go to Glenys for
providing all the "bits and bobs".

Our August meeting is on Saturday 9 August (this date varies from the
date in the Programme) when we are off to explore the Sawyers Bay/Port
Chalmers area. For further information on this please contact Lyn
Hastie 4822896 or Lyne Carlyle 4822822.

by Lesley Smith

--
--
From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand.
All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public
domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished.
If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

WARRINGTON SURF LIFE SAVING CLUB

The building work is all done. We are all very impressed with our
lovely new kitchen and toilet area. Fundraising will never seem the
same with such a beautiful outlook while catering and doing dishes.
Sadly money did not stretch to our new Kitchen which is bare and needs
lots of items. Do you know anyone who has a
fridge,oven,microwave,zip,etc etc? You may know a business selling up
or changing equipment. Contact Kaye 4822494 or Christine 4822005.

'Jandal Day', the Surf Life Saving movement's national appeal day,
will be held on Friday 5 December. Put a circle around this date in
your diary. It was a great fundraiser last year. You and your
workmates can nominate which surf club your monies go to, so you
copuld hold a raffle or dress up at your school or workplace and the
money can be designated for Warrington.

Would you like to know a bit more about rules and regs during surf
competitions? Is this something you may wish to help out with? There's
a course coming up. Please let Lyn know and names will go to Otago
Surf. Uniforms supplied.

We have some fun ideas for things to do and hope lots of you who are
12ish and over will come along. Find out what's involved in being a
guard or patrol support person, have fun in the IRB, on a board, meet
up with locals, eat and generally make the most of what Warrington
Club has to offer you and your mates.

Surf Life Saving Otago (that's all of us in the southern part of the
South Island) , is celebrating 75 years – a wonderful achievement for
a great organisation. The committee want lots of us to go along and
take part in some of the celebrations. Friday 22 August there will be
a get together at St Kilda with supper, Saturday 23 photos at St Clair
and time for catching up. At night there will be a meal at the Glenroy
Auditorium including breads and dips,entreesmain and dessert, wine etc
included $40.00 pp. This is heavily subsidised by Otago Surf. There
will be a slideshow going through the past to present, speakers
including our very own founding member Mrs Pat Ellison and also the
past season's break up and prize giving. This evening will be well
worth attending and you've got 7 weeks to save up for it. I MUST have
names to book a table for us all. Tables take 10 people, so let's send
a group along and have a fun night. Sunday 24 a BBQ (no cost) get
together at St Kilda.

This will be the build up before the big one. Yes, Surf Life Saving in
New Zealand will celebrate 100 years in 2010.

Our next monthly meeting will be held in our lovely warm extended
meeting room at 7.30pm on Monday 4th August.

Thankyou to those who continue behind the scenes, Pru with the funding
issues, Polly paying the bills, Cherie - the greatest swim coach, Kaye
and Lyn and Pru the meeting attendees in town and Murray who has spent
lots of time raking and shovelling gravel around the building. Michael
has visited the swimming lessons with boards for sessions in warm and
waveless conditions.

Our Annual General Meeting will be held on Friday 29th August at 7pm
in the meeting room. All families are asked to send along a
representative. Format is 'sweet treats' and drinks. Please bring
along a plate to share.

It may not be summer but it is still busy at Warrington surf club.
Keep warm and enjoy the fresh winter air.

by Christine Rainbow

--
--
From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand.
All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public
domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished.
If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

Warrington Playcentre

Hello all, we hope this update greets you all well and happy.

The Warrington Playcentre parents, supervisors and children are
bursting with energy for another term of fun and learning.

We're all extra excited about the awesome new brightly coloured
interior we have married together with the new carpet and lino, making
it a gorgeous centre to be in.

We commissioned the very talented Roz Picken of Fifigoose Designs to
come in over the holidays and give our centre a makeover on which she
has done an exceptionally beautiful job. You can see more of her work
at Here It Is, down in the Gardens next to Pet Planet, you'll be
wowed. We now have a Pukeko monitoring our cupboard, an albhabet wall
for the children to read whilst eating their kai and many many more
characters to visually stimulate us.

We currently have vacancies available and are looking for more
families to join our centre. We therefore encourage anyone within our
community to walk in the gate and discover the wonders of Warrington
Playcentre.

So please feel free to come visit us on Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and
Friday between 9am – 12noon. You'll hear the children's laughter
before seeing us, so follow that gorgeous sound and be part of it.

This month we say a fond farewell to two of our 5 year old boys
heading off to school – good luck to Patrick and Alex, we wish you
well in the next chapter of your lives and hope that you have enjoyed
your time at Warrington Playcentre as much as we have enjoyed watching
you grow and blossom.

Take care, and watch this space as Warrington Playcentre whanau will
have plenty more to report on for the next edition.

by Hannah Randall

--
--
From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand.
All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public
domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished.
If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

Monday, 21 July 2008

WARRINGTON INDOOR BOWLS

Warrington Indoor Bowls continues to meet at warrington Memorial Hall
on a Tuesday night at 7.30 pm. The cost is $1.00 and supper is
provided.

We wish the best to our departing members, Selma to greener pastures,
Pete and George to other commitments, Colin to retirement and Alison
on maternity leave.

We welcome Dennis and John.

Congratulations are extended to Ruth Stevens for reaching 80 years
young and to Alison for her new daughter Lani.

Warrington club continues with rounds of interclub, tournaments and
representative games with our members realizing various measures of
success.

Cliff, Ruth P, Ruth S, Andrew, Daniel and Stephne continue to
represent Eastern Districts and will be at Waimate in the Quadrangular
on 2 August.

Ruth P continues to offer valuable service as umpire at events.

We welcome any one who is interested in coming to bowls and in this
day of petrol price rises it is something you can do in your own back
yard.

For any information contact Stephne: 4822 585.

by Stephne Bennett

--
--
From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand.
All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public
domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished.
If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

UPDATED version: THE BLUESKIN BAYLEAF: A Winter feast

Here is a menu to prepare and share which is guaranteed to fill your
home with gorgeous smells from the kitchen. So light the fire, turn
off the telly, open some pinot and sit around the table for a good
winter meal.

Lamb chops

Preheat oven to Bake 160°C

• 6 lamb chops

• 1 onion

• shallots or garlic

• 1/4 cup Balsamic Vinegar

• 1 1/2 cups beef stock

Dust the chops in flour and brown with oil in a hot pan.

Add 1 chopped onion, sauté for 3 minutes then add chopped fresh
shallots and/or garlic. You want to retain the sweetness in the
garlic, so always add it after the onion is cooked. Put it all in a
casserole dish.

Pour over the vinegar and stock. Add a spoonful of herbs (the ones you
have been drying from your bumper summer crop to use in the winter,
rosemary is tasty with lamb) and a bayleaf. Add a shake of salt and
pepper. Optional: a splash of Worcestershire sauce.

Cover and bake in the oven for 1 hour. Check it every now and then to
make sure it does not dry out, if it has add more water, 1/2 a cup at
a time.

Serve with mashed roots – try a carrot and swede mix – and braised
leeks (below).


Braised Leeks

Men: did you know a 10g serving of leeks, shallots or onions a day can
halve your risk of prostate cancer?

• 2 medium leeks

• 1 1/2 cups of good chicken stock

• 1 lemon

Cut leeks into 1cm rings, brown with 1 T butter in a hot pan for 5 minutes.

Pour in the stock, cover and simmer for 15 minutes.

In a bowl, rub together 30grams butter and 3 T flour until it
resembles breadcrumbs.

Sprinkle over leeks in pot and stir, it will turn thick and gravy
like. Stir for 5 minutes.

Squeeze in the juice of 1 lemon and the zest of 1/2 a lemon. Salt,
pepper and serve.

Coconut Sago with Ma's special Tamarillos

• 1 can coconut milk
• milk
• 1/2 cup dried sago
• 6 – 10 tamarillos

Bring the sago with the coconut milk and one empty coconut can of
cow's milk to a boil in a pot then turn down and simmer for 10 minutes
or until the sago balls are clear. You need to keep an eye on it and
make sure it does not stick. Add 1/2 cup sugar. Stir, then add a good
knob of butter. If it gets too thick, add a little more milk.

Put the tamarillos in another pot with water, bring to a boil for 2
minutes. Drain off the hot water and cover with cold water. You can
now easily peel the skins off. Chop them up, put them in a bowl and
add 1/2 cup sugar. Leave to stand for half an hour to draw the juices
out and it will go all syrupy.

Serve in bowl with a dob of cream (if you wish) and a sprig of mint.
Also makes a great breakfast!


Cooking classes

I am considering the idea of running cooking classes, maybe once a
month – is there any interest for this? Please tell me: fantail @
callsouth .net .nz.

by Rowan Holt

--
--
From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand.
All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public
domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished.
If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

WARRINGTON RESERVE GROUP

PHOTO: Joseph Dougherty of Warrington Reserve Group clears plastic hay
baling film from the Group's tree-planting site at the edge of
Warrington Domain. The building in the background is the Kings High
Shool outdoor education hostel, 'The Hatherly'. Photo supplied by
Warrington Reserve Group.

WARRINGTON RESERVE GROUP

A big, heartfelt thank you to everyone who helped with the planting at
Warrington Domain. It is very satisfying to have started the windbreak
of native plants. As we write this, we have had one successful
planting day. By the time you read this, a second public planting day
and an afternoon planting with Warrington school children will have
occurred.

On Sunday 6 July we had a wonderful group of people from the Otago
region, including Warrington, Waitati and Karitane. They braved the
snow on the hills and came with spades, warm hats, and yummy food to
share at smoko. We heated water on a gas burner for cups of tea under
the macrocapa trees.

It was very special to have Matt Ellison, from Puketeraki Marae, give
a warm welcome and offer karakia before we began planting. Holes had
been dug into the sand, soil, and mulch layers beforehand, to make the
planting process easier. Harakeke/ flax, toe toe and pittosporum
tenuifolium were planted this year.

Special thanks go to many people. Local archaeologist Brian Allingham
contributed his expertise at the planning stage, to obtain permission
from the Historic Places Trust. He was also on site for the fencing
and planting, ensuring the site was respected, for which we are
grateful. Matt Schmidt at Historic Places Trust gave generously of his
time and knowledge. Mark Ross, Martin Thompson and Scott McLean at DCC
all contributed their time and commitment, and provided the financial
backing. Many local people did lots of work behind the scenes, over
several years, to make sure this planting project actually happened.

Ecologist David Blair shared his expertise in fence design. David and
a team of people dug the holes for fence posts, put up warratahs,
wire, rabbit-proof netting and shade cloth for added wind protection.
The rabbit proof netting goes along a short distance just under the
ground, as well as up the lower part of the fence, so we hope it will
keep the hungry rabbits out. Dunedin Environment Centre grew the
plants for us, and Designer Trees provided the soil and mulch.

If you walk around, you will see that we've only planted on part of
the site. There will be ongoing work weeding throughout the year, and
planting days over the next few winters to cover the site. We'll keep
you informed about when we need your help again.

Any suggestions or queries, please phone Karen Hobday on 4822762

by Karen Hobday, Wiremu Bretton and Roxy Hesson

--
--
From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand.
All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public
domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished.
If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

W3 RIDE SHARE

Start Saving Your $2 Coins – it's all go! We've had great support for
the W3 Ride-Share with over 50 people joining the register.

Monday 11 August is the start date. So those who are registered and
driving into town keep an eye out for those who have decided to get a
lift (wearing ID and waiting opposite 'Gallery on Blueskin') – and
expect $2 from them.

On your return journey to Waitati, if possible, swing by NZ Blood on
the one-way and also look out for folk waiting at the Willowbank Motor
Court (one-way) one block back from the start of Pine Hill Road.

Registering for this rideshare scheme is ongoing, so if you decide at
a later date to join, you can search for the form from
www.blueskin.co.nz or get a form at the Blueskin Library.

No obligation one-way travel. Remember you don't have to pick anyone
up if you don't feel like it nor do you have to fill your car with
people. For this scheme to be successful, we encourage people to not
drive and get a lift at least once a week.

If you have registered and not received your ID by the weekend prior
to start date, please contact Jackie on 482-1517 or Louise at the
Blueskin Library.

Parking and bike stand are available at the Blueskin Bay Library.

Happy Travelling!

by Jackie Fanning

--
--
From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand.
All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public
domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished.
If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

HELP The HIGHLAND HORSE HAVEN

HELP The HIGHLAND HORSE HAVEN

Mt Cargill Road, Waitati.

Buy Some Excellent Hubbard's Fundraising Muesli: 750g bag only $3

Buy 5 Bags get the 6th one free!

Phone Geraldine for Muesli Orders: 4822 517 (leave a message).

The aim of the haven is to provide a home and rehabilitation to
neglected horses. Once horses are back to good health they will be
rehomed.

For more details or if you would like to offer practical help or make
a donation contact Shelly McBratney 488 5254 or 027 307 3746, PO Box
54 Waitati.

by Geraldine Tait

--
--
From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand.
All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public
domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished.
If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

OPINION: How to get to town each day with out going bankrupt

As the cost of transport fuel keeps rising I get more and more nervous
about how I can keep living in beautiful Blueskin Bay and carry on
working in Dunedin. I expect that like many of you, I am finding
petrol price rises beginning to bite! What I really worry about is not
the cost today but what it will be in a year, two years or five years
time.

So what are my options? I could ride a bike, and if this were the
Canterbury Plains, that might almost be realistic, but until they put
a tunnel through Mt Cargill, I know I'd never make it.

I could part with my trusted, all purpose, diesel station wagon and
buy a little, modern, low fuel use, bubble car but the price tag puts
me off.

I could get a little motorbike again but actually I think I'm a bit
old and wimpy. The motorbike was ok, except when it was windy, really
wet or foggy. I got completely lost and disoriented on the top of Mt.
Cargill one foggy night many years ago, I could still see the road but
just had problems with my internal GPS. All that gear to help keep me
warm and provide protection is a bit of a drag too.

I could go back to hitchhiking but this makes me feel a little
nervous. Is the world a bit scarier these days or am I a little less
naïve? The new Ride Share Scheme starting in Waitati sounds great. If
this gets going and thrives, it offers a definite glimmer of hope.

What about the bus service? It only runs three times a day, never at
night or in the weekends, but Graeme the driver is a nice guy and the
bus is warm and comfortable. I've been gently trying to convince
myself that despite the lack of flexibility of being tied to the bus
times (and the anxiety it seems to create in someone who is often
running late and always thinks they've missed the bus) that compared
to the rising cost of running a car, the bus is a reasonable deal.

However the Otago Regional Council does not appear to think we deserve
a service equal to that in Brighton, Portobello or other areas on the
margins of Dunedin and has made an across the board price rise of 25%.
So the Dunedin to Waitati/Evansdale fare rises from $5 to $6.25 –
though you can still get the miserable 10% reduction if you have a "Go
Card". The highest fare in other parts of Dunedin was $4, to get all
the way to Harrington Point on the Peninsula (30k). I think the fares
for our area should have stayed the same, then more lazy car drivers
like me might be lining up for the bus and with more customers Graeme
could consider extending the service; more buses each day and maybe
even a late night one so we could catch a movie, do the grocery
shopping or go to the pub for a couple of hours after work.

The Otago Regional Council will say that to avoid increased bus fares,
ratepayers will have to contribute more towards the bus service
through rates. Well I don't mind if we do. There are more people who
are not so well resourced using buses; young people, elderly and
lower-waged workers, and as rates are based partly on the value of
your property, those of us who are better off can help maintain an
accessible and affordable bus service, while those who can afford it
will still drive their cars and pay ever increasing prices at the
pump.

by Geraldine Tait

--
--
From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand.
All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public
domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished.
If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

THE BLUESKIN BAYLEAF: A Winter feast

Here is a menu to prepare and share which is guaranteed to fill your
home with gorgeous smells from the kitchen. So light the fire, turn
off the telly, open some pinot and sit around the table for a good
winter meal.


Braised Leeks

• 2 medium leeks

• 1 1/2 cups of good chicken stock

• 1 lemon

Cut leeks into 1cm rings, brown with 1 T butter in a hot pan for 5 minutes.

Pour in the stock, cover and simmer for 15 minutes.

In a bowl, rub together 30grams butter and 3 T flour until it
resembles breadcrumbs.

Sprinkle over leeks in pot and stir, it will turn thick and gravy
like. Stir for 5 minutes.

Squeeze in the juice of 1 lemon and the zest of 1/2 a lemon. Salt,
pepper and serve.


Lamb chops

Preheat oven to Bake 160°C

• 6 lamb chops

• 1 onion

• shallots or garlic

• 1/4 cup Balsamic Vinegar

• 1 1/2 cups beef stock

Dust the chops in flour and brown with oil in a hot pan.

Add 1 chopped onion, sauté for 3 minutes then add chopped fresh
shallots and/or garlic. You want to retain the sweetness in the
garlic, so always add it after the onion is cooked. Put it all in a
casserole dish.

Pour over the vinegar and stock. Add a spoonful of herbs (the ones you
have been drying from your bumper summer crop to use in the winter,
rosemary is tasty with lamb) and a bayleaf. Add a shake of salt and
pepper.

Cover and bake in the oven for 1 hour. Check it every now and then to
make sure it does not dry out, if it has add more water, 1/2 a cup at
a time.

Serve with mashed roots and lightly steamed silver beet.


Coconut Sago with Ma's special Tamarillos

• 1 can coconut milk
• milk
• 1/2 cup dried sago
• 6 – 10 tamarillos

Bring the sago with the coconut milk and one empty coconut can of
cow's milk to a boil in a pot then turn down and simmer for 10 minutes
or until the sago balls are clear. You need to keep an eye on it and
make sure it does not stick. Add 1/2 cup sugar. Stir, then add a good
knob of butter. If it gets too thick, add a little more milk.

Put the tamarillos in another pot with water, bring to a boil for 2
minutes. Drain off the hot water and cover with cold water. You can
now easily peel the skins off. Chop them up, put them in a bowl and
add 1/2 cup sugar. Leave to stand for half an hour to draw the juices
out and it will go all syrupy.

Serve in bowl with a dob of cream (if you wish) and a sprig of mint.
Also makes a great breakfast!


Cooking classes

I am considering the idea of running cooking classes, maybe once a
month – is there any interest for this? Please tell me: fantail @
callsouth .net .nz.

by Rowan Holt

--
--
From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand.
All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public
domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished.
If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

Classified Ad

REGULAR RIDE Wanted to and from Dunedin Mon-Fri. I live on the Kilmog
and need to be in Dunedin (Smiths City Andy Bay Road) by 8am. Can you
help me? I could help reduce your weekly petrol bill! Phone Jaryd 465
8318

Friday, 18 July 2008

Warrington Reserve planting ahead of schedule

The Warrington Reserve Group's tree planting day on Sunday 6 July was
such a sucess, with so much planting achieved, that the planned Sunday
20 July planting session has been cancelled, spokesperson Karen Hobday
has announced.

The planting day on Sunday 27 July at 10:00am will still go ahead as planned.

The group hopes to have 1000 plants in the ground this July 2008. All
seedlings have been grown by
volunteers at the Dunedin Environment Centre.

Any questions, phone Karen 4822762.

by the editors

--
--
From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand.
All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public
domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished.
If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

Wednesday, 16 July 2008

Keeping it reel: Waitati Film Society

Waitati Film Society programme for rest of 2008

Half year memberships now available at $30. Drama, comedy, history
or just plain entertainment in a warm, pleasant environment with
convivial company. Membership allows you free entry to screenings of
Film Society as well as discounts at Film Festivals and some Dunedin
cinemas.
Ring: Leonie 482-2508 for more info or check out our website:
www.nzfilmsociety.org.nz/waitati.htm

by Leonie Rousselot

Tuesday Aug 12
BOYS DON'T CRY USA 1999
A youthful Brandon Teena arrives in a hick Nebraskan town and soon
joins the local rough necks who do nothing much, as there's nothing
much to do, just hang out. But after a sexual encounter with Lana,
Brandon, in reality Teena Brandon, is treated very differently; after
all it's a town where men are men. Unlike the documentary, The
Brandon Teena Story, this version adds a little fiction, but is very
powerful all the same. 114m

Tuesday Aug 19
CIRCLE OF FRIENDS Ireland/USA 1995
Three close girlfriends are in their first year at university in
Dublin. As very different personalities, each has their own romantic
experiences, but, as chance has it, their relationships with their
boyfriends overlap, with complicated consequences. 85m

Tuesday Aug 26
BACKBEAT UK 1993
Before being swamped by fame, the Beatles built up a screaming
teenage following in the cellars of Liverpool and Hamburg. This story
centres on John Lennon's friendship with the fifth Beatle, Stuart
Sutcliffe, who's affair with bohemian Astrid Kirchherr, the creator
of the mop top image of the band, tested their friendship and outlook
on life. 100m


Presenting three films by Ross McElwee
Tuesday Sept 2
CHARLEEN USA 1978
Charleen Swansea had been McElwee's charismatic high school teacher.
This film is a character portrait, revealing a wise, flamboyant
educationalist, equally effective in a classroom of wary
Afro-American poetry students as in a Bible class of genteel southern
white women. 59m
BACKYARD USA 1984
The title refers to McElwee's own backyard - a microcosm of southern
society - surgeon father, medical student brother and their domestic
staff who, as Afro-Americans, barely contain their anger at the
casual racism they have to cope with every day. Also casting a shadow
over this film is the personal tragedy that struck the family. 40m

Tuesday Sept 9
SHERMAN'S MARCH USA 1986
Described as McElwee's most celebrated film, it recounts what
supposedly started as a personal journey retracing General Sherman's
murderous sweep through the secessionist Southern States during the
American Civil War. But, oddly, the film transforms into "a
broken-hearted filmmaker's clumsy chivalrous quest to find love".
155m


Tuesday Sept 16
REAL WOMEN HAVE CURVES USA 2001
The conflicts of curvaceous Latino Ana's coming of age include
resolving her restrictive conservative upbringing with the exciting
possibilities opening up if she followed a college education to
develop her burgeoning writing skills. The story fortunately does not
get bogged down with the complexities of teenagidity, because humour
is added to the mix in layers. 93m


Tuesday Sept 23
OMAGH Ireland/UK 2004
For all we know, the town of Omagh could be charming, but
unfortunately it's name is synonymous with the violence of a massive
car bomb that exploded there in 1998. This gripping film covers the
aftermath, the survivors, both Catholic and Protestant, and the hunt
for the perpetrators. Michael Gallagher, a bereaved father, battles
the supposedly impartial and sympathetic authorities, trying to find
answers. You may find a resonance here with the political
exploitation of 9/11 victims and survivors. 106m


Tuesday Sept 30
COSI Australia 1995
People with psychiatric disorders will often respond to emotional
sentiments with heightened passion. Lewis, a hospital drama
therapist, decides to put on a production of Mozart's Cosi fan Tutti
with a cast of, amongst others, a drug addict, nymphomaniac,
introverted neat-freak and arsonist. The somewhat chaotic result,
both on and off the stage, is made up of resolving various troubled
relationships. 100m

Tuesday Oct 14
IN SPRING ONE PLANTS ALONE NZ 1980
Vincent Ward's short but moving story of an 84-year-old Maori mother
trying, as best she can, to look after her handicapped 40-year-old
son. 45m
A STATE OF SIEGE NZ 1978
The first film by Vincent Ward and based on a novel by Janet Frame.
Her new, anticipated, independent lifestyle is in reality not exactly
what this retired teacher expected. 52m

Tuesday Oct 28
EVIL ANGELS Australia 1988
Meryl Streep and Sam Neill play Lindy and Michael Chamberlain, whose
explanation that their child was dragged from their tent by a dingo
was not believed by the authorities. So started an incredibly long
drawn out and tortuous police investigation and prosecution, Lindy
indicted for the murder of her daughter and Michael as an accessory.
This film is based on a story written by a barrister who was critical
of the prosecution's handling of the case. 121m

Tuesday Nov 11
THE EXTERMINATING ANGEL Mexico 1962
As with surrealistic works of art, this film can be searched for
meaning or just enjoyed for what it is. Bourgeois diners inexplicitly
have a compulsion not to leave after the party. Over subsequent days
they reduce the magnificently appointed salon to a sordid rubbish
heap. One guest dies and is stuffed in a cupboard - but that's
nothing compared with other bizarre happenings. 93m

Tuesday Nov 25
THE MOON OVER THE ALLEY UK 1975
A focussed look at a small community of boarders in a rooming house
off Portobello Road, Notting Hill. It is saved from kitchen-sinkism
by the diverse, multi-racial, multi-national, more than ordinary,
quirky characters. It is a drama with musical colouring, revealing a
mixed working class existence in a decaying urban environment. 100m

Tuesday Dec 9
MURIEL'S WEDDING Australia 1994
A less than attractive, ABBA-obsessed Muriel Heslop decides to jump
the rails and move from her comfortable hometown to the big city. The
story is the celebration of an odd ball; it projects a cheeky,
benevolent satirical spirit, celebrating the dreams of losers and
outcasts. Undoubtedly the success of this film was largely due to
Toni Colette as the emotionally flamboyant Muriel. 105m


--
--
From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand.
All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public
domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished.
If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

Friday, 11 July 2008

COAST ROAD MARKET AT SEACLIFF: SUNDAY 3 AUGUST

COAST ROAD MARKET AT SEACLIFF

SUNDAY 3 AUGUST

FROM 11AM RAIN OR SHINE

ARTS, CRAFTS, FOOD, BRICABRAC AND SUNDRIES

FREE STALLS AVAILABLE PHONE 465 7990 TO REGISTER. KIDS' STALLS WELCOME

FOLLOW THE SIGNS FROM EVANSDALE OR KARITANE TO SEACLIFF

by Liz Abbott

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--
From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand.
All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public
domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished.
If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

BLUESKIN MEDIA AGM

AGM

BLUESKIN MEDIA

(Publishers of Blueskin News, Blueskin Bay Visitors' Guide, the
blueskin.co.nz website and, occasionally, Blueskin Bay Local News on
Puketapu Radio)

Monday 11 August 2008
7pm
Blueskin Bay Library, Waitati

Agenda:

•present the books
•elect officers
•discuss future direction and operation of our publications

Our AGM, like all our meetings, is open to everyone and we have a
long-standing tradition of very short meetings (one hour max).

--
--
From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand.
All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public
domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished.
If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

Tuesday, 8 July 2008

Matariki celebrated in Warrington

On Tuesday 24 June Warrington School celebrated Matariki, a
constellation of stars in the sky. All the children at Warrington
School went to the four corners of Warrington with their lanterns.
Then all the children met in the
middle and strode onto the tennis court. The children waited until
everyone was settled and then repeated everything they did at the
Kaupapa Maori Festival in Plamerston earlier in the month.

After a short speech from principal Nathan Parker, the students and
many playcentre children went to play down the bank in the pitch black
darkness. Occasionally they came up for some kindly donated delicious
food.

The best night all year!

by Eva Stoddart

--
--
From blueskin.co.nz and 'Blueskin News' published by Blueskin Media:
voluntary/non-profit community publishers in Blueskin Bay (Seacliff,
Warrington, Evansdale, Waitati, Doctors Point), Dunedin, New Zealand.
All material sent to or published by us is "copyleft" in the public
domain and may be freely shared, archived, re-edited and republished.
If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".