Tuesday, 19 June 2007

Waitati Film Society announces Programme for the second half of 2007

The Waitati Film Society has announced its programme for the second
half of 2007. The previously announced film for 24 July has changed
from 'Stolen Kisses' to 'Soft Skin'.

Half year memberships are now available at $30. Drama, comedy,
history or just plain entertainment in a warm, pleasant environment
with convivial company. Membership allows you free entry to screenings
of Film Society as well as discounts at Film Festivals and some
Dunedin cinemas.
Ring: Brigitte 482-2829 or Leonie 482-2508 for more info or check out
our website: http://www.nzfilmsociety.org.nz/waitati.htm

Tuesday July 24
SOFT SKIN (France/Portugal 1964)
A superb tragi-comedy of adultery in which a middle-aged intellectual
ducking out from under a demanding wife tries to turn a casual affair
with an air hostess into the love of his life but succeeds only in
triggering a calamitous crime of passion. 113min.
(This has been changed from 'Stolen Kisses' previously announced.)

Tuesday Aug 14
IMAGINE (USA 1988)
Named after his last solo album, this is an insight into the real John
Lennon and his influence on the 20th century through his music and
very public promotions of peace and love. Edited from over 100 hours
of film and tape donated by Yoko Ono, and with largely Lennon's own
commentary, it exposes us to many aspects of the man and the personal
history that made him what he was. 100min.

Tuesday Aug 21
FORTY GUNS (USA 1957)
A rare film that left critics wordless because of its audacious,
pre-Women's Lib depiction of Jessica (Barbara Stanwyck), a
leather-clad cattle baroness who wields her whip against the most
masculine of cowhands. With the dialogue's many phallic references to
guns, this movie has been dubbed by some as a Freudian western.
80min.

Tuesday Aug 28
FIXED BAYONETS (USA 1951)
The most effective war films are not those of machines killing the
unseen masses but instead come close up and personal to those killing
and being killed. Surrounded by the enemy and trapped in a snowbound
cave, a platoon of US soldiers fight a rearguard action during the
Korean War. 92min.

Tuesday Sept 4
DRY WOOD/HOT PEPPER (USA 1973)
Wti Film Soc. members have become familiar with Les Blank's style -
documentaries with no narration, few explanations, no interviews; he
just lets us blend in with the lives of his subjects through their
music. Tonight's two films visit the French speaking Afro-Americans of
southwest Louisiana's Cajun country. 105min.

Tuesday Sept 11
THE LODGER (USA 1944)
Like Jack the Ripper, a secretive man rents a room from the beautiful
singer Kitty (Merle Oberon) and her father (Cedric Hardwicke). During
the day he paces his room, at night he darts between the shadows of
the damp cobblestone streets of foggy Victorian London. 84min.

Tuesday Sept 18
THE YES MEN (USA 2003)
These men are forever being invited by global trade advocates to
travel the world to give their slick PowerPoint presentations on free
trade to government and industry representatives, people ready to
accept anything from the mouths of those from a seemingly
authoritative institution. We follow them performing to CNN, USA
students, textile conference delegates in Finland and accountants in
Sydney. 80min.

Tuesday Sept 25
THE MURDERERS ARE AMONG US (East Germany 1946)
This film, with THE BRIDGE on Oct 30, comes from a "German Cinema
after the War" series all of which face the raw realities of immediate
post-WWII still with its guilt and overpowering feeling of defeatism.
A concentration camp survivor returns to find her apartment taken over
by a shell-shocked surgeon. 91min.

Tuesday Oct 2
SPELLBOUND (USA 2002)
In the USA there are many ways in which young children find themselves
involved in the sort of extremes of competitiveness that most adults
would find impossible to cope with. Be it fashion modelling, singing,
dancing, or as in this film, spelling, the kids are mere vehicles for
their parents' aspirations. 97min.

Tuesday Oct 16
RUBY AND RATA (New Zealand 1990)
Gaylene Preston's justifiably cherished comic drama framed around a
between-generations conflict, and ultimate compromise, between Rata,
Ruby (Yvonne Lawley) and Willie (Lee Mete-Kingi) - the last two
bringing us one of NZ cinema's most memorable odd couples. 111min.

Tuesday Oct 30
THE BRIDGE (West Germany 1959)
Any intensely nationalistic regime, surroun-ded by its enemies, facing
previously unthin-kable defeat, throws every imaginable thing at the
advancing forces, including its innocents. So it was with Germany in
1945. Indoctrinated teenagers were put into the fray and made to
throw their lives away on futile, and often stra-tegically
unim-portant, mis-sions. 104min.

Tuesday Nov 13
THE WOMAN NEXT DOOR (France 1981)
Truffaut's contemporary domestic drama set in a provincial town is
drawn from the bourgeois milieu in this tale of amour fou. Depardieu
(plus wife and kid) moves in next door to a newly-married woman with
whom he had an obsessional affair eight years earlier. 131min.

Tuesday Nov 27
13 RUE MADELEINE (USA 1947)
This WWII thriller centres on a training course for USA agents who are
to be dropped into occupied Northern Europe prior to D-day. Sharkey
(James Cagney) pushes his recruits hard, giving them near impossible
tasks, all the while suspecting one of them is a German agent. 95min.

Tuesday Dec 11
COPS (USA 1922)
Buster Keaton does it again - sheer genius in every frame. 24min.
THE CURE ( USA 1917)
Classic Chaplin short set at a spa. 26min.
DOUBLE WHOOPEE (USA 1929)
Laurel and Hardy, two doormen at a swank hotel, encounter a young Jean
Harlow. 26min.
EASY STREET (USA 1917)
Possibly Chaplin's greatest film, this small epic features Charlie the
policemen over-coming a daunting thug. 22min.

by Leonie Rousselot

--
"copyleft" by Blueskin Media - may be freely re-edited and
republished. If you want to credit the source it's "blueskin.co.nz".

No comments: